OUHSChttps://news.ouhsc.edu/Thought for the Day

“The most authentic thing about us is our capacity to create, to overcome, to endure, to transform, to love and to be greater than our suffering.” ~Ben Okri

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OUHSC Campus Awards photos | Available now!

Congratulations to all students, faculty and staff who received awards at the 2015 OUHSC Campus Awards Celebration on Monday, April 13th!

Photos taken that evening by Party Pics are available for viewing and/or ordering at this link: Click to View Your Images

If you have questions about ordering photos, contact Oklahoma Party Pics at 405-364-1777.

 

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Native American Student Association (NASA) Elections - April 27

Through Email | Deadline: 11:50 PM

Would you like to be an Officer? It is that time of the year to elect and nominate new officers for the Native American Student Association, so if you have been wanting to get more involved in campus activities with more than just your college now is your chance! Please nominate yourself or someone else for one of the four officer positions in our fantastic organization. Some of our highlights of our events include: bringing artists to share culture (including live art painting and poetry), craft events such as mini beaded headdresses, NASA trivia and cultural give-a-ways, and so much more…

Please nominate yourself or a friend for one of our officer positions before Monday April 27th @11:59PM

·         President

·         Vice-President

·         Treasurer

·         Secretary

Nominations can be sent to daniel-trobare@ouhsc.edu or nasa@ouhsc.edu

For more information, contact Daniel Trobare daniel-trobare@ouhsc.edu.

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De-Stress Fest Survey – T-Shirt Give-away | Today – May 6

Online

If you participated in De-Stress Fest and would like a t-shirt (while supplies last) please complete this survey:

http://studentvoice.com/uo/destressfest15

Once survey is complete, print off completion page and bring to HSC Student Affairs, located in the DLB Student Union, Suite 300, to claim your T-shirt. First come, first serve. Thanks for participating!

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Web Server Migration - OUHSC Website Content Unavailable Friday, April 24 from 5pm-until migration is finished.https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1864Fri, 24 Apr 2015 00:00:00 GMTWeb Server Migration Notice of OUHSC Websites

Friday, April 24th starting at 5:00pm through Saturday, April 25th at 8pm IT will be migrating OUHSC websites to new web servers. Any changes or updates made during this time period may be lost. Please plan your updates accordingly check back for Migration Updates.

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Shining a New Light on Ovarian Cancer Treatment: New $1.5 million grant funds research aimed at better treatment with fewer side effectsA new $1.5 million grant to researchers at the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center will advance work focused on an illuminating new treatment for ovarian cancer.

The five-year National Institutes of Health grant funds research by Youngjae You, Ph.D., a member of the Stephenson Cancer Center and associate professor with the OU College of Pharmacy. His team is focused on the use of photodynamic therapy to target ovarian cancer tumors.

Ovarian cancer is one of the deadliest forms of cancer for women, claiming the lives of more than 14,000 women in the United States each year. This year, another 21,000 women will receive a new diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

Photodynamic therapy is a treatment that utilizes special drugs called photosensitizing agents. Those agents work only after they have been activated by light. By combining photodynamic therapy with site-specific chemotherapy drugs, You and his team hope to provide an extremely targeted cancer-fighting treatment for ovarian cancer – one that defeats the cancer while reducing many of the side effects often associated with traditional chemotherapy.

“The awarding of this NIH grant is a tribute to Dr. You and his research team and marks an important milestone for their work to help advance treatment for ovarian cancer. NIH funding of this kind is critical to our work at Stephenson Cancer Center as we further our mission to not only provide the best possible cancer care, but also to develop new, more effective treatments with fewer side effects for cancer patients,” said Robert Mannel M.D., director of the Cancer Center.

The grant awarded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health is an NIH Research Project Grant, commonly known as an R01 grant.  The R01 is the original and historically oldest grant mechanism used by the NIH, providing support for health-related research.    
  
“I am very excited about this grant. It funds important work aimed at helping save more lives,” said You.

Last year, You and his research team received a $550,000 Department of Defense grant to advance their research into photodynamic therapy in combination with site-specific chemotherapy as a treatment for breast cancer. This new grant from the NIH allows them to apply the same core principles to the treatment of ovarian cancer.

“Dr. You’s research greatly enhances the depth and breadth of expertise necessary to sustain a productive, collaborative drug discovery core in the OU College of Pharmacy,” said JoLaine R. Draugalis, R.Ph., Ph.D., dean of the college. “His pharmaceutical chemistry and cancer research themes as well as his photodynamic therapy approach generate excitement within the college and University.”

You said the challenge with ovarian cancer is that the cancer often is not discovered until it is in an advanced stage. Most women with ovarian cancer undergo surgery first, followed by chemotherapy to target any cancer cells that may remain following surgery.  Traditional chemotherapy, however, affects healthy cells as well as cancerous ones. You’s team hopes to change that by utilizing their new photosensitizing agents and activating them only after they have reached the tumor site.

"We can deactivate the toxicity and activity of the cancer-fighting drugs by using our special chemical bond and photosensitizer to make prodrugs,” You said. 

Prodrugs are drugs that are administered in an inactive form. The prodrug is delivered by intravenous injection, much like regular chemotherapy. The difference is that, unlike traditional chemotherapy drugs, prodrugs are not active until exposed to near infrared light, which is introduced only at the tumor site. The light breaks the chemical bond that prevents the drug from working, thereby activating its cancer-fighting ability. The goal is to kill the cancer cells while helping patients avoid the systemic side effects associated with standard chemotherapeutic drugs. 

“Dr. You has built upon his initial photodynamic therapy research to add an even more innovative component that decreases adverse effects and ensures that the drug is on target when activated,” Draugalis said.

Although laboratory studies must be completed before human trials begin, Dr. You said photodynamic therapy combined with site-specific cancer-fighting drugs may hold promise in the treatment of other cancers too, including head and neck, esophageal, lung and bladder cancers. 

The research funding is from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health (grant number 1R01GM113940-01).


ABOUT THE STEPHENSON CANCER CENTER 
Oklahoma’s only comprehensive academic cancer center, the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma is a nationally noted leader in research and patient care. The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top five cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead centers nationally in the Institute’s National Clinical Trials Network. In collaboration with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is decreasing the burden of cancer in Oklahoma by supporting innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research. The Stephenson Cancer Center has 200 research members who are conducting over 100 cancer research projects at institutions across Oklahoma. This research is supported by $31.1 million in annual funding from the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society and other sponsors.


ABOUT THE OU COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
The University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy is committed to contributing to society through state-of-the-art education and research as well as modern, innovative pharmacy practices and services. With more than 5300 graduates since 1896, the college helps ensure the public need for safe and effective pharmaceutical care is met.  

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1896Thu, 23 Apr 2015 00:00:00 GMT
MyORA: Contractshttps://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1893Thu, 23 Apr 2015 00:00:00 GMTMelanoma’s Achilles Heel: OU Team Assists in Research Focused on Promising New Cancer-Fighting ApproachWe get vaccinated to keep from getting sick. Now, new research shows vaccines may prove powerful in the fight against cancer too.  

The vaccines, in this instance, are personalized for each patient, designed to generate a powerful immune response against unique mutations in his or her own melanoma tumor cells. Figuring out which mutations to target fell to a team of researchers at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, headed by William Hildebrand, Ph.D., a member of the Stephenson Cancer Center and George Lynn Cross Research Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the OU College of Medicine. 

The work started with colleagues in St. Louis who used genomics to find genetic mutations within the cells of the tumor but not in the patient’s healthy cells. They uncovered thousands of cancer mutations. 

That’s where the OU researchers stepped in. Hildebrand and other OU researchers zeroed in on proteins unique to melanoma cells that would betray the cancer cells very existence.  

“This is a different approach that says we know what is specific to your particular tumor. That’s what we are going to target,” Hildebrand explained.  “But if you have all of these mutations in the DNA of your tumor, which of these mutations can we target?  Which of these mutations reveals itself on the surface of a tumor cell so you can focus the immune response to it with a vaccine, in this instance?”

Using specific tests and computer algorithms, Hildebrand’s team was able to predict and test which of the many mutations in the tumor cells would provide the best vaccine targets.

With the targets developed at the OU Health Sciences Center, co-investigators at Washington University used immunotherapy techniques to create a customized vaccine for each patient – much like a personalized smart-missile system inside the body.  Early data reveals a revved up immune response to the tumor cells. More study is needed, but researchers believe the approach and the results are promising.

“This is an early generation of this research,” Hildebrand said.  “We are going to get better and better at finding this population of targets and then selecting the specific targets to address the tumor.”

Hildebrand added that it’s an approach that may also work for other types of tumors. 


About the Stephenson Cancer Center 
Oklahoma’s only comprehensive academic cancer center, the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma is a nationally noted leader in research and patient care. The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top five cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead centers nationally in the Institute’s National Clinical Trials Network. In collaboration with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is decreasing the burden of cancer in Oklahoma by supporting innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research. The Stephenson Cancer Center has 200 research members who are conducting over 100 cancer research projects at institutions across Oklahoma. This research is supported by $31.1 million in annual funding from the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society and other sponsors.


About the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
An internationally prominent faculty, state-of-the-art facilities and new technology combine to make the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center a leader in education, research and patient care. One of only four comprehensive academic health centers in the nation with seven professional colleges – Allied Health, Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Public Health and Graduate Studies – the OU Health Sciences Center serves approximately 4,000 students in more than 70 undergraduate and graduate degree programs on campuses in Oklahoma City and Tulsa.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1895Wed, 22 Apr 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Occupational Medicine Provider Joins OU PhysiciansCurtiss (sic) Farrell, M.D., has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. He is board certified in family medicine and is providing occupational medicine services through OU Physicians.  

Farrell completed a residency through the University of Iowa, Iowa City. He earned his medical degree from the University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. 

He is a member of the American Academy of Family Practice.     

OU Physicians Occupational Medicine is located on the OU Health Sciences Center campus at 825 N.E. 10th Street, Oklahoma City. For more information, call (405) 271-WORK (9675).

With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state’s largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 

OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region’s future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1892Wed, 22 Apr 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Pediatric Gastroenterologist Joins OU Children's PhysiciansCamilla Fraga-Lovejoy, M.D., a pediatric gastroenterologist, has established her medical practice with OU Children’s Physicians. Gastroenterologists specialize in treating diseases and disorders of the digestive system. 

Fraga-Lovejoy is board certified in pediatrics. She completed a pediatric gastroenterology fellowship at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. She completed a pediatric residency and internship at Miami Children’s Hospital, Florida, and earned her medical degree in Brazil.

She is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition.

For an appointment with any OU Children’s Physicians pediatric gastroenterologists, call (405) 271-6549.

OU Children’s Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma’s largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 

Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children’s Physicians are board certified in children’s specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 

OU Children’s Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can’t be helped elsewhere come to OU Children’s Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children’s Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children’s emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1891Wed, 22 Apr 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Dentist Joins OU Children’s PhysiciansSallie McLane Lau, D.M.D., has established her dental practice with OU Children’s Physicians Dentistry.

Lau had previously been in private practice in the Oklahoma City area since 2002.  She completed her dental residency at the University of Oklahoma College of Dentistry. She earned her dental degree at the University of Louisville School of Dentistry, Louisville, Kentucky. 

Lau is a member of the Special Care Dentistry Association, American Dental Education Association, Oklahoma Association of Women Dentists, Oklahoma Association of Pediatric Dentists, Southwest Society of Pediatric Dentistry, American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, Oklahoma Dental Association, Oklahoma County Dental Association and American Dental Association.

OU Children’s Physicians Dentistry offers general surgery services for both pediatric and adult patients. The clinic is located at 1200 Children’s Ave. For appointments, call (405) 271-4750.

OU Children’s Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma’s largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 

Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children’s Physicians are board certified in children’s specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 

OU Children’s Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can’t be helped elsewhere come to OU Children’s Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children’s Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children’s emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1890Wed, 22 Apr 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Newly Elected 2015-2016 HSC Student Government Association Executive Board!

HSC Student Government Association Executive Board elections were held on April 21st at the HSC Student Senate meeting. Please see the below names of the newly elected 2015-2016 officers. Congratulations to this diverse team of dynamic student leaders! Newly elected HSC SGA president, Jevon Oliver, is excited for the year ahead and hopes to continue to improve/expand the opportunities and events for our student body.

2015-2016 HSC Student Government Association Executive Board

Jevon Oliver, President

Collin Herman, Vice President & Chair, HSC Student Senate

Shelby Olson, Secretary

Mark Ray, Treasurer

Jennifer Stone Dunning, Chair, Campus Activities Board