OUHSChttps://news.ouhsc.edu/Thought for the Day

“Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time.” ~Thomas A. Edison

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Thanks for Participating in Adopt-a-Patient 2014!

This year the HSC campus (students, faculty, and staff) provided gifts for 60+ patients at The Children’s Hospital and OU Medical Center. Thanks to all who participated for your generous spirit!  You made someone smile this holiday season!

 

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Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration | January 15

DLB Student Union 3rd Floor Lounge | 11:45 AM - 1 PM

The African American Student Association will be paying homage to the great Martin Luther King Jr. at the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration starting at 11:45 a.m. on January 15 with the silent march from the campus clock tower to the David L. Boren Student Union. See flyer.

Date/Time: Thursday, January 15 / 11:45 – 1 p.m.

Location: David L. Boren Student Union 3rd Floor Lounge

Contact: Anica Taylor anica-taylor@ouhsc.edu, aasa@ouhsc.edu or Tanya Mustin tanya-mustin@ouhsc.edu or call (405) 271-2416.

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D2L Monthly Maintenance | December 20

https://learn.ouhsc.edu | 7 AM – 2 PM

REMINDER: During monthly maintenance, D2L may be down and unavailable. It is NOT recommended to submit assignments or tests during maintenance times!

Date / Time: Saturday, December 20, 2014 from 7:00AM - 2:00PM

Location: https://learn.ouhsc.edu

Contact: web-courses@ouhsc.edu

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All College Party | January 30

Will Rogers Theater | 8 PM – Midnight

HSC Student Government Association invites all seven colleges to help raise money for Children’s Hospital Foundation.  Join your fellow classmates for a Decade Dance! Stay updated by joining the ACP Facebook event!

 

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SYSTEMS ALERT: Enterprise Server Monthly Maintenance - Brief Disruption Possible
  • Information Technology will perform routine monthly server maintenance Saturday, December 20th, 2014 from 7:00AM - 2:00PM. This procedure is scheduled monthly to install security patches, perform upgrades and modifications, reboot systems and test fail-over capability.

  • Brief disruptions may occur for Internet connectivity, all websites hosted by HSC IT, Exchange email, file and print services, database services, and PeopleSoft.

  • The seven hour period reserved for monthly maintenance is specified due to the large number of managed servers and in preparation for unexpected problems that can occur when patching and updating servers. Maintenance on primary services such as email and file services are scheduled early to minimize inconvenience to customers.

  • In the event a problem is experienced during these procedures, an extended disruption may be experienced. To find out what the problem is and how long you can expect the service to be down, please go to www.ouhsc.edu/InsideHSC/ or call the IT hotline at 405.271.4747.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=491Tue, 16 Dec 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Touchnet Maintenance Period (Friday, January 2, 2015)https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=383Fri, 12 Dec 2014 00:00:00 GMTQuality in Focus: Improved Health Care Impacts Health Equity Improving overall quality of care for hospitalized patients produces a welcome by-product --improvements in the equity of care for racial and ethnic minorities.

    That's the conclusion of a new report by researchers, including Dale Bratzler, D.O., M.P.H., professor and associate dean of the University of Oklahoma College of Public Health. The study appears in the current issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

    "Certain racial and ethnic minorities historically have not received the same quality of care as Caucasian patients," said Bratzler. "Our research shows that improving health care overall closed the gap."

    The findings are based upon a survey of over 12 million patients at about 4,000 American hospitals in the United States.  It began almost a decade ago when the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services began an ambitious public reporting initiative. 
     
    "Beginning about 2005, all hospitals in the country essentially had to start reporting quality of care metrics for heart attack, pneumonia and heart failure," Bratzler said. "Then in 2012, Medicare payments to hospitals became contingent upon how well those hospitals implemented federal metrics for quality of care. As a result, overall quality of care at hospitals in the U.S. was found to have significantly improved."
     
    Yet, did the gap in care for minorities remain? That is the question Bratzler and fellow researchers tackled in their work.
     
    "We wanted to see if improved overall quality of care on these common conditions – heart attack, pneumonia, or heart failure – would decrease racial disparities as well as to determine whether disparities in care were improved not just within hospitals but also between hospitals."
    At the start of the survey in 2005, researchers found nine measures for which minority patients (three for black and six for Hispanic patients) received substantially lower quality of care than white patients. Six years later, these racial and ethnic gaps in quality of care for all of these measures had narrowed.
     
    In some cases the disparities narrowed significantly. In others, they were entirely eliminated as overall quality of care improved for white, black and Hispanic patients," Bratzler said.
     
    In addition, the study found the disparities not only declined for white and minority patients treated in the same hospital, they also declined in hospitals that serve larger proportions of minority patients.   
     
    "The study shows that quality improvement interventions are relatively blind to color or ethnicity. That’s likely because efforts to improve quality of care often attempt to make care more consistent and less variable and may thereby also reduce inappropriate variations based on race or ethnicity," Bratzler said.

    Researchers said the study supports ongoing tracking of quality of care for minority and non-minority patients in an effort to continue to detect whether quality improvement efforts further enhance equity of care. 
     
    The study was funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The research team included members from the Oklahoma Foundation for Medical Quality, OU Health Sciences Center, Brown University, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Providence VA Medical Center and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. 
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1773Thu, 11 Dec 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Orthopedic Surgeon Joins OU Physicians Rishi Thakral, M.D., a fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeon, has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. He has also been named an assistant professor with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. 
          
    Thakral specializes in limb salvage and reconstruction, total joint replacement (hip and knee), revision total joint surgery, hip preservation surgery, lower extremity deformity correction and lengthening.
          
    Thakral completed fellowships in adult reconstructive surgery at the University of Chicago and then at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. He also completed a fellowship in limb reconstruction and lengthening at Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Md. Thakral completed orthopedics and surgery residencies in Ireland. 
          
    He is a member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and AOTrauma, an international community of trauma and orthopedic surgeons and others dedicated to improving patient care and outcomes in the field of musculoskeletal trauma.
          
    Thakral sees patients at the OU Physicians building, 825 N.E 10th Street, Oklahoma City. For an appointment with an OU Physicians orthopedic hand surgeon, call (405) 271-2663.
          
    With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
          
    OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1772Thu, 11 Dec 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Poundwise Holiday Potluck and Parties Guide'Tis the season … the season for parties.  With invitations to office parties, neighborhood parties, church parties and more from now right through New Year's Eve, how do you participate without packing on the pounds? Health experts say it just takes a little planning.
     
    With so many holiday parties, buffets and potlucks, and so many delicious options readily available, it's easy to overindulge. Health experts say that's where a little pre-party planning can help.
     
    A great trick is to make sure you don't show up hungry, said Molly Fernando, Psy.D., with Harold Hamm Diabetes Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. If you arrive famished, you will be more likely to overindulge. So she suggests eating a healthy snack before you go. 
     
    When you arrive, evaluate your options before you start filling your plate.
     
    "Just walk around the buffet table. See what choices you have. Then when you actually get in line to get your food, you already know what you are going to choose. So that can be a very easy trick," Fernando said.
     
    Here are a few other pound-wise holiday potluck and party tips from the health experts at Harold Hamm Diabetes Center:
     
    •         Choose a smaller plate. This allows you to load up with smaller portions of your favorite foods and still have a full plate.
    •         Eat slowly and savor the food while enjoying the company of friends and family.
    •         Don't stand next to the food. Distance is your friend when it comes to buffets.
    •         If you are thinking about going back for seconds, wait 10 minutes. It takes a while for your brain to register that you are full. So if you wait before going back for more, you may realize that you are already full.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1770Thu, 11 Dec 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    OU Nurses Sweep ONA Awards 2014Faculty at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center College of Nursing won all four individual awards presented by the Oklahoma Nurses Association at its annual conference. As the leading professional organization for nurses in the state, the Oklahoma Nurses Association recognizes and advocates for excellence in the nursing profession. The faculty were recognized for achievements in research, excellence in nursing, impact on public policy and a career of exemplary achievement.  

    Lazelle Benefield, dean of the College of Nursing, was honored with the Nursing Research Award for producing excellent research in geriatric nursing, focusing on aging in place and the ways that nurses and caretakers, especially those looking after a family member with dementia, could use technology to assist in their caregiving. The award recognized that not only was the research itself innovative, but it created clear ways for nurses to implement the findings and improve outcomes for patients and caregivers. The models Benefield created can be used to fill in gaps in care and provide guidelines for nurses and family caregivers, who provide more than half of the care for people with dementia. It also demonstrated how nurses at a distance can stay in touch with caregivers and patients to ensure that needs are met.  

    Gary Loving, the college's associate dean for Academic Programs, received the Excellence in Nursing Award recognized his pioneering use of technology and distance education, representing a unique and creative approach that uses nursing theory in a practice setting. Loving began using technology to connect classrooms across the state as early as 1992—far before the current wave of online and synchronous courses. The next 25 years have seen further adoption of technology-mediated instruction put in place at the College under his direction. At present, the College of Nursing is a leader in both exceptional instruction and innovative ways to deliver it. He has provided leadership in teaching informatics, innovative online instruction and in the use of clinical simulations, including inter-professional simulation lab opportunities that allow student nurses to work alongside other healthcare students to gain experience as close to the real-world as possible.
     
    Janet Sullivan Wilson received the award for Nursing Impact on Public Policy following the signing of State House Bill 2526 into law in May 2014 by Governor Fallin. Dr. Wilson's research in the late 1990s recognized intimate partner violence as both a public health and criminal problem that caused preventable injuries and deaths in Oklahoma. This work resulted in the formation of a statewide fatality review board that today reviews all intimate partner fatalities, collects and analyzes data, and recommends best practices for a wide variety of professionals in health care, law enforcement, and social services to better identify and intervene in domestic violence. Case analyses from this fatality review board discovered that professionals responding to intimate partner violence needed evidence-based tools to be effective. 

    Wilson's most recent research, funded by the National Institute of Justice, evaluated police use of a lethality screen and safety protocol when called to homes for intimate partner violence, thus shifting the emphasis to violence prevention. Because of this study's findings and her collaboration with Oklahoma's violence prevention agencies, HB 2526 includes the intervention evaluated in her research. Oklahoma is the first state in the country to legislate police use of the lethality assessment protocol intervention, specifying that victims have the right to know the signs of lethality and be given state resources to keep them safe. Wilson is on the Oklahoma Attorney General's newly formed Lethality Assessment Council to help with the coordination and implementation of this law. 

    Professor Emma Kientz, coordinator for the College of Nursing at the OU-Tulsa Schusterman Center, was honored with the Nightingale Award of Excellence, recognizing a career of exceptional achievements in nursing. Kientz is noted for serving as a role model of consistent excellence and a leader in her field. In addition to teaching students in the classroom for the past 12 years in online and clinical areas, she is responsible for managing the college's daily operations in Tulsa. Her impact reaches into the community, where she serves on the executive management team of the Tulsa Healthy Start Initiative and as a member of the Tulsa Family Health Coalition. In the areas of preventative health care, she serves as a program reviewer for the Association of Prevention Teaching and Research and is an active member of the Oklahoma Health Aging Initiative Northeast Region. In addition, she is pursuing a Doctorate in Nurse Practice.

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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1771Wed, 10 Dec 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Orthopedic Surgeon Joins OU Children's PhysiciansDavid Y. Chong, M.D., a pediatric orthopedic surgeon, has established his medical practice with OU Children's Physicians. He has also been named an assistant professor of pediatric orthopedic surgery at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.
          
    Chong has a specific interest in diagnosing and treating children with congenital deficiencies, often performing limb reconstruction, hip preservation and spine surgery. 
          
    Chong completed a fellowship in limb deformity and reconstruction surgery at the Paley Advanced Limb Lengthening Institute, West Palm Beach, Fla. He completed a fellowship in pediatric orthopedic surgery at the University of Utah/Shriner's Hospital for Children, Salt Lake City. He completed his orthopedic surgery residency at the University of Alabama-Birmingham Medical Center and earned his medical degree with honors in orthopedic surgery and primary care at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville.
          
    Chong sees patients in the OU Children's Physicians building, 1200 Children's Avenue, Oklahoma City. For appointments with OU Children's Physicians orthopedic surgeons, call (405) 271-2669.
          
    OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
          
    Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
          
    OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1769Tue, 09 Dec 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    OU Research Earns Cover of Prestigious Cancer PublicationUniversity of Oklahoma research pointing to a possible and promising new treatment for one of the deadliest cancers is prominently showcased in the newest edition of a top cancer research publication.  

    The research by Altaf Mohammed, Ph.D., and C.V. Rao, Ph.D., of the Stephenson Cancer Center is featured on the cover of the December issue of Cancer Prevention Research--the flagship journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

    "It is really a great honor for me to have our work featured on the cover of this prestigious publication," said Mohammed, who also is a faculty member of the OU College of Medicine's Department of Internal Medicine.

    Rates of pancreatic cancer have increased slightly over the past decade. According to the American Cancer Society, about 46,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer each year and more than 39,000 die. It is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths among American men and women. OU researchers say finding an effective treatment and ultimately a cure is critical.

    "Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers," Rao said. "It is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths among American men and women; and according to one estimate, it could become the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths by the year 2020."

    Rao, Mohammed and their research team at the Stephenson Cancer Center are focused on the impact of a specific drug on pancreatic cancer. The drug already is FDA-approved as a topical treatment for excessive facial hair growth in women and as an injectable treatment for sleeping sickness. However, it has also shown promise in about 20 clinical trials (ongoing/completed) in treating several cancers, including skin and colon cancer. 

    The OU team is evaluating the drug's effectiveness against pancreatic cancer in laboratory studies. Their work shows the drug effectively inhibits the growth of pancreatic carcinoma. While more study is needed, the researchers say the laboratory research may point the way toward clinical trials of the drug in patients with pancreatic cancer soon. 

    "We believe our work may help move such clinical trials onto the fast track  ̶  perhaps as early as next year, " Rao said. 

    Increasing the chance for rapidly moving forward with clinical trials is the fact that the drug has shown no toxicological or human safety concerns in previous clinical trials for other cancers. 

    "I am thrilled that other cancer researchers will read of our work," Mohammed said of the publication about their work in Cancer Prevention Research. "This is an important drug, which has been studied for a long time in other cancers, but not for the pancreatic cancer."

    The research is supported by funding from the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health (NCI grant N01-CN-53300).

    ##

    About the Stephenson Cancer Center 
    Oklahoma's only comprehensive academic cancer center, the Stephenson Cancer Center is a nationally recognized leader in research and patient care. The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top five cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead centers nationally in the NCI's National Clinical Trials Network. In collaboration with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is decreasing the burden of cancer in Oklahoma by supporting innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research. The Stephenson Cancer Center has 180 research members who are conducting over 100 cancer research projects at institutions across Oklahoma. This research is supported by $28.7 million in annual funding from the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society and other sponsors.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1768Fri, 05 Dec 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Student Parking Permits (OKC Campus) | Renew Now!

    Renew online | Service Center Building 100

    The Fall 2014 parking permits will expire on December 31st.  Beat the crowds in January by renewing for Spring 2015 now!  Permits are $108 for the Spring semester.  Renew and pay online and then bring your permit to the Parking Office to have the new decal affixed.  OUHSC Parking Office hours are 7:30 am-5 pm, Mon-Fri and we are located in the Service Center Building, room 100.  The OUHSC Parking Office will be closed from December 24th-January 4th, so stop by soon!  Questions?  Call the OUHSC Parking Office at 271-2020.  *Don’t forget to bring your permit with you.*

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    T-shirts for sale for Rx-a-Wish | order by December 13

    The College of Pharmacy's Rx-a-Wish committee will be selling t-shirts, with all profits benefiting the Make-a-Wish Foundation.  There are multiple colors and styles offered and prices range from $18-$20.  The shirts can be ordered on the College of Pharmacy's marketplace or at this link.
    The deadline is Friday, December 13th.  See attached artwork and contact Tanner Tiedeman at tanner-tiedeman@ouhsc.edu with any questions!

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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1766
    The Holidays: Your "No Diet" ZoneThe holiday season is no time for dieting. That's the word from experts at Harold Hamm Diabetes Center at the University of Oklahoma, but that doesn't mean you can't still focus on your health.

    "This is the holiday season, you don't want to put yourself on a strict diet or any diet for that matter," said Molly Fernando, Psy.D., a clinical psychologist with the Diabetes Center. 

    The fact is "diet" is a four-letter word as far as most health and nutrition experts are concerned. That's because most people associate the word with restrictive eating plans that may even focus on fads that are not healthy and often not designed to produce long-term positive results for your health. 

    Yes, the holiday season can be filled with delicious and tempting foods, but Fernando said the key to managing your waistline and your health, even if you are living with diabetes, is to shift your thinking.

    "You can make the healthy choices; but you can also indulge a little and have a piece of that holiday cake that you enjoy. You just have to be mindful of what you are putting into your body and remember everything in moderation," she said.

    Fernando knows that small changes in the way we think can have a big impact on what we choose to eat or drink and in our activity levels too. They have seen the strategy work for the many Oklahomans who have taken advantage of the Diabetes Center's Small Steps, Big Changes program. It's a program that empowers participants to live healthier through small, easy-to-make changes in both diet and exercise. It helps participants learn how to live fully while making better choices for their health, even during the holidays.

    "During the holidays, we may feel like we are inevitably going to overspend, overeat and overtire ourselves, but we don't necessarily have to," Fernando said. "Just remember that you can control what goes into your body, the decisions that you make and the responsibilities that you take on. All it takes is a little planning ahead to maintain your health and still enjoy the holiday season."

    Health experts at Harold Hamm Diabetes Center recommend the following 10 tips to focus on improved health this holiday season:
     
    1.            Keep Your Doctor's Appointments
    The holiday season can be extremely busy with things to do, meals to prepare, shopping and more. Sometimes, regular doctor's visits take a back seat to other things. In order to maintain your health, especially if you are living with a chronic disease like diabetes, it is vital to make keeping those doctor's appointments a priority.
    2.            Don't Forget Your Medications
    When you get busy, it's easy to get off schedule when it comes to medications, but that can put your health at risk. So remember to take all medications as instructed. If you have diabetes, be sure to test your blood sugar regularly and to adjust your medications accordingly.
    3.            Snacking Helps
    Eat a healthy snack before attending a holiday function. This can curb your appetite and help you make healthier choices and to avoid overindulging. 
    4.            Potluck Those Parties
    Oftentimes, everyone brings something to holiday parties and gatherings. So bring something you like, but that is also lower in sugar, calories and fat. This ensures that you will have at least one healthy choice.
    5.            Super Small-Size the Plate
    Choosing a smaller plate helps trick your mind. That way you fill your plate full with smaller portions of your favorite foods. 
    6.            Watch What You Drink 
    Many holiday drinks pack a hefty helping of sugar and calories. So choose water or other low and calorie-free beverages like club soda, diet beverages or tea. Alcoholic beverages should be kept to a minimum as they can sabotage both glucose control and healthy decisions.   
    7.            Make Physical Activity Fun
    Even shopping can help you get up and get moving. Park farther out and take a few extra laps around the mall to "window shop." When families gather, take a walk with a favorite relative to talk and catch up or gather the entire family for a game of football or soccer after the meal. 
    8.            Get Your ZZZs
    When you are tried, you may be tempted to grab for food to help bolster your energy. Adequate sleep also helps reduce stress.
    9.            Just Say NO!
    Plan ahead for what you can and can't do during the holidays. We can't do it all. So learn to set boundaries and to politely say "no" when a request exceeds them. 
    10.        Manage your stress!
    See tips 7, 8 and 9. Regular physical activity, adequate sleep and setting appropriate boundaries will help you reduce your stress and enjoy the holidays more!        
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1764Wed, 26 Nov 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Travel To and From Ebola-Impacted AreasTo All OUHSC Faculty, Staff, Students, and Residents:

    This is an update about the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center's efforts to monitor the Ebola outbreak in West Africa continually and take appropriate steps to assure the protection and safety of our faculty, staff, students and residents. There have been no cases of Ebola in Oklahoma, but we must be vigilant and prepared, and take steps to keep our community safe.

    The Health Sciences Center is now putting in place travel restrictions to West African countries under CDC Level 3 travel warnings—Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. In addition, we are requiring medical screening for all those who have traveled to any of these countries, before return to the campus is permitted. Almost all universities and colleges throughout the country are taking similar actions.

    Travel Restrictions and Guidance
    Given the evolving situation and our responsibility to protect the health of the community, OUHSC is prohibiting student, faculty, and staff travel for University business or academic purposes to Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone.

    1. OUHSC students, faculty, and staff MAY NOT TRAVEL for University study abroad, research, grant activity, internships, to perform academic work for credit, service, conferences, presentations, teaching, performances, recruiting or athletic competitions in the West African nations under CDC Level 3 travel warnings (the list may change, view CDC website for countries covered by current travel advisories).
    2. Travel for personal reasons to countries under CDC travel warnings is strongly discouraged.
    3. Hosting visitors from countries under CDC travel warnings for personal or OUHSC-related purposes (visiting lecturers, visiting scholars, researchers, etc.) is strongly discouraged.

    Other Precautions:

    1. OUHSC requires Individuals committed to personal travel to countries under the CDC travel warnings to be in touch with your college Dean and the Provost's Office prior to making plans.
    2. OUHSC requires members of the community who are considering hosting visitors or family on University property from any of the countries under CDC travel warnings to obtain approval from the college Dean and the Provost's Office prior to the visitor's arrival.
    3. OUHSC requires travelers returning from Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone to contact OUHSC Employee Health if faculty or staff, or OUHSC Student Health if a student to arrange a risk assessment by telephone to determine any medical needs as well as eligibility to be on campus. Travelers should contact these offices within 48-72 hours of their departure from one of the affected countries.
    4. OUHSC follows CDC guidance on potential exposure to Ebola. As such these travelers may be required to self-isolate at home for up to 21 days upon their return. Travelers should ensure that they have sufficient time available for isolation if this is required.

    If you are still contemplating travel to an Ebola-affected region, the guidance in this document can help you evaluate your own readiness and also assess the suitability and preparedness of the support organizations with which you may work. If you still wish to travel to the affected countries, you must adhere to the guidelines noted above. Please visit the CDC site at http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel for Travel Notices and Updates.

    M. Dewayne Andrews, M.D.
    Senior Vice President and Provost
    Executive Dean, College of Medicine
    University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1762Tue, 25 Nov 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Helping Those with Alzheimer's Remain Independent LongerA new grant will help advance research at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center aimed at helping individuals with Alzheimer's retain their independence longer.
     
    Alzheimer's affects 60,000 Oklahomans, a number that is projected to grow by more than 25 percent in the next decade. 
     
    Now, the Alzheimer's Association has awarded almost $100,000 to the OU College of Allied Health. The grant funds a new phase of research into a method known as Skill-building through Task-Oriented Motor Practice or STOMP, a non-drug therapy that showed promise in earlier research in preserving cognitive function in people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. It is one of only three non-medication studies awarded grants by the Alzheimer's Association this year. 
     
    "Based on our previous STOMP clinical and at-home studies, we know that this method of therapy helps patients with dementia or Alzheimer's retain their ability to perform daily life skills," said Carrie Ciro, Ph.D., principal investigator and assistant professor of occupational therapy at the OU College of Allied Health.
     
    Developed by researchers at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, STOMP utilizes repetitive therapy in an effort to strengthen and preserve procedural memory, the memory that allows individuals to accomplish tasks of daily living.  
     
    "Our brain is hard-wired to improve in activities that we practice. While conscious memory for facts and personal information is impaired in dementia, procedural memory -- unconscious memory for activity performance -- is retained later in the disease," Ciro said.
     
    The STOMP method allows researchers to identify tasks most important to each individual with Alzheimer's and then practice those tasks on a regular basis. Such activities might include bill paying, operating the microwave, taking medications properly or operating a computer to access Email.
     
    In previous studies, Ciro said participants practiced such activities for three hours every day, five days a week for two weeks both in a clinical laboratory, designed to be similar to the home environment, and also in their own homes. 
     
    "Now, we want to determine the minimum amount of therapy needed to help these patients sustain those skills and lower their risk of institutionalization," she said.
     
    In the newest study, all sessions will be in the participants' homes. Half will participate in the skill-building activities three hours a day, five days a week for two weeks as in the original studies. The other half will do skill-building activities one hour two days a week for two weeks.   
     
    "The goal is to determine whether the amount of therapy makes a difference in the retention of procedural memory," Ciro said.  
     
    "For Oklahomans with Alzheimer's and their more than 200,000 caregivers, I believe this research at OU will drastically help in their daily lives," said Nellie Windsor, communications director, Oklahoma Chapter of the Alzheimer's Association. 
     
    Recruitment for the newest STOMP clinical trial is already underway. To qualify for the study, individuals must:
    -          Be between the ages of 55 and 80
    -          Have mild to moderate dementia
    -          And live at home with a spouse or caregiver
     
    Participation in the study is limited. To learn more about the study, call (405) 271-2131.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1760Fri, 21 Nov 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    2015 HSC Campus Awards Applications | Deadline to apply: January 30, 2015 by 4 PM

    Apply online                                                                                                     

    Student Awards Applications are available online.

    We encourage all qualified students and student organizations to apply.

    Applications available NOW!

    ·         2015 Outstanding Senior Student Leadership Award ~ (Monetary & Plaque Award)

    ·         2015 Multicultural Achievement Award ~ (Monetary & Plaque Award)

    ·         2015 Outstanding First Year Student Leadership Award

    ·         2015 OUHSC Outstanding Registered Student Organization Award

    ·         2015 OUHSC Outstanding Registered Student Organization Adviser Award

     

    Applications are available at http://students.ouhsc.edu/FormsandPolicies.aspx. Applications (6 copies) should be turned in to HSC Student Affairs, David L. Boren Student Union, 1106 N Stonewall Avenue, Suite 300, Oklahoma City, OK 73117 no later than 4 p.m. on Friday, January 30, 2015.  If you have any questions concerning the procedures, please contact Tanya Mustin (tanya-mustin@ouhsc.edu) or call (405) 271-2416.

     

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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1758
    Bird Library Hours for Winter Break

    Winter Break hours

    December 15-19: 7 AM to 10 PM

    December 20-21: 10 AM to 10 PM

    December 22-23: 8 AM to 5 PM

    December 24-26: Closed

    December 27-28: 10 AM to 10 PM

    December 29-30: 8 AM to 5 PM

    December 31, 2014-January 1, 2015: Closed

    January 2, 2015: 8 AM to 5 PM

    January 3-4, 2015: 10 AM to 10 PM

    January 5, 2015: Resume normal hours

     

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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1753
    2015 HSC Campus Awards ApplicationDeadline to apply: Friday, January 30, 2015
    Student Awards Application Packets are available online. Application deadline is Friday, January 30, 2015.
    We encourage all qualified students and student organizations to apply.

    Application Packets available NOW:

    • Outstanding Senior Student Leadership Award - (Monetary & Plaque Award)
    • Multicultural Achievement Award - (Monetary & Plaque Award)
    • Outstanding First Year Student Leadership Award
    • OUHSC Outstanding Student Organization Award
    • OUHSC Outstanding Student Organization Advisor Award

    Applications are available at  http://students.ouhsc.edu/FormsandPolicies.aspx .  Applications (6 copies) should be turned in to HSC Student Affairs, David L. Boren Student Union 1106 N Stonewall Avenue, Suite 300, Oklahoma City, OK 73117 no later than 4 p.m. on Friday, January 30, 2015.  If you have any questions concerning the procedures, please contact Tanya Mustin (tanya-mustin@ouhsc.edu) or call (405) 271-2416.

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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1404
    Pathologist Joins OU PhysiciansPathologist Rachel Conrad, M.D., has established her practice with OU Physicians. She is also a clinical instructor of pathology with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. 
          
    Conrad is board certified in pathology and cytopathology (the branch of pathology that studies and diagnoses diseases on the cellular level). She completed a cytopathology fellowship at the University of California, Los Angeles. She completed her residency in anatomic/clinical pathology at Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, California, where she also earned her medical degree. 
          
    Conrad is a member of the American Society of Clinical Pathology, the College of American Pathologists, U.S. and Canadian Academy of Pathology and the American Society of Cytopathology.
          
    With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
          
    OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.

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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1747Tue, 04 Nov 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Keep HSC GreenHelp the Health Sciences Center live Green!

     
    Members of the campus community are encouraged to recycle the below items at the David L. Boren Student Union:
    • Plastic
    • Newspaper
    • White paper
    • Aluminum

    Please be mindful of the helpful hints from the HSC Green Team.
     
    Computers
     
    • Screen savers DO NOT save energy. Instead put your computer into “sleep mode” by enabling power saving features. When not actively in use, your monitor and hard drive will go into a low power mode.
    • Turn OFF your monitor when going to lunch, taking a study break or attending a meeting.
    • If your computer must be left on, turn off the monitor.
    • Use the “print preview” option to find potential errors before printing, because saving paper saves energy.

    General Office Equipment
     
    • Enable power-saving features on all equipment.
    • Use power strips, but turn equipment on and off individually.
    • Buy office equipment with the “Energy Star” label. Energy Star products meet or exceed the Environmental Protection Agency’s energy efficiency criteria.
    • Schedule energy-intensive activities in the morning hours to avoid peak electrical rates, such as running large numbers of copies or prints, experiments, etc.

    Your Environment
     
    • Keep window shades and blinds closed when the sun is directly on the windows.
    • Limit the use electric space or radiant heaters; they are a fire hazard and consume enormous amounts of energy.
    • When gone for extended periods of time, unplug personal refrigerators and/or microwaves.
    • There are certain electronic devices that continue to use power even though they are not turned on, lovingly called "Phantoms". To help save electricity in your home or office remember to unplug your phone, laptop, camera, iPod, and/or power tool charger.
     
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=534Tue, 01 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Nephrologist Joins OU PhysiciansUsman Z. Bhutta, M.D., has established his practice at OU Physicians. Nephrologists specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders affecting the kidneys. 
          
    Bhutta is board certified in internal medicine and board eligible in nephrology. He completed a nephrology fellowship at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where he also completed an internal medicine residency. He earned his medical degree in Pakistan.
          
    Bhutta is a member of the American Society of Nephrology.
          
    With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
          
    OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1741Fri, 31 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Hand Surgeon Joins OU Physicians Yuri Lansinger, M.D., a fellowship-trained hand surgeon, has established her medical practice with OU Physicians.
          
    Lansinger sees adult and pediatric patients with hand and upper extremity injuries and conditions. She also sees patients with general orthopedic conditions. 
          
    She completed a hand surgery fellowship through the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. She completed an orthopedic surgery residency at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. She earned her medical degree from Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, D.C., where she also earned a master's degree in physiology. She earned an additional master's degree in Biblical studies from Westminster Seminary California, Escondido.
          
    Lansinger is a member of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand, International Congress for Joint Reconstruction and American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.     
          
    Lansinger sees patients at the OU Physicians building, 825 N.E 10th Street, Oklahoma City. For an appointment with an OU Physicians orthopedic hand surgeon, call (405) 271-2663.
          
    With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
          
    OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1740Fri, 31 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Setting Errant Heart Rhythms RightResearchers at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center are exploring the effectiveness of a new high-tech treatment for atrial fibrillation, a common heart rhythm disorder.

    Atrial fibrillation affects more than 2.5 million Americans. With atrial fibrillation, rapid, disorganized electrical signals cause the heart’s two upper chambers to beat very fast and irregularly.  Atrial fibrillation can cause strokes and death.

    Current treatments involve drugs or surgery, but a new approach is being investigated that focuses on stimulating the vagus nerve, a nerve that exists on both sides of the body and plays an important role in helping the heart beat within a safe range.
      
    "It's been shown that people who have a greater vagal tone are less likely to suffer a heart attack, are less likely to have sudden cardiac death or an adverse outcome following a heart attack,” said Stavros Stavrakis, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor in the department of Cardiology at the OU College of Medicine and member of the OU Heart Rhythm Institute.

    Stavrakis and his team are evaluating the therapeutic potential of low-level vagus nerve stimulation in the treatment of atrial fibrillation.

    The approach utilizes a stimulator surgically implanted around the vagus nerve.
       
    "So you just do a small incision in the neck; put that in; and then the stimulator communicates wirelessly with an external generator,” Stavrakis said.

    The hope is that by stimulating the vagus nerve at a level that is not slowing the heart rate and is not noticeable by the patient, the device will be able to prevent episodes of atrial fibrillation, thereby regulating and restoring a more normal heart rhythm.

    If successful in the laboratory, the developers of the device believe clinical trials could begin in the United States as early as next year. The company already is in the process of testing a prototype in patients in Europe.

    While commercial availability of the device in this country is still probably five to ten years away, Stavrakis said it is promising technology and may provide a way to offer a minimally invasive treatment for atrial fibrillation. However, he emphasizedthe technology would likely be used to complement, rather than replace, current atrial fibrillation treatments.

    The research is being conducted in conjunction with Rosellini Scientific with funding from a $75,000 NIH Small Business Innovation Research grant.
    ]]>
    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1738Wed, 29 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Accidental Injury Can be the Real Scare on HalloweenHalloween brings costumes, gatherings and trick-or-treating, but it can also pose hidden dangers for children.

    "Every year about 42 million get involved with trick or treating for Halloween and they go to about 110 billion houses across the United States," said Kirk Verbrugghe, an emergency room physician at Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. "In all of the excitement, accidents sometimes happen. That's why it's important to take steps ahead of time to help protect your children from accidental injury."

    Verbrugghe and fellow E-R physicians at Children's say pedestrian versus vehicle accidents result in some of the most serious injuries they see. 

    "Everyone just needs to slow down and pay extra attention on Halloween night," Verbrugghe said. "You've had a long day at work and you are coming home. It's right around the time that all the little ones are going to be trick or treating. So you just really, really need to slow down throughout your neighborhood. Make sure there are no distractions.  Turn your radio off. Turn your cell phone off. Don't text and just keep a close eye out for the kids."

    Here are other tips to help keep your Halloween festivities safe: 

    Make sure costumes are not too long and are made of flame-resistant materials
    Face paint or makeup is preferable to masks, but if wearing a mask enlarge the eye holes to allow full vision.
    Make sure costumes are not too long, which can cause trips and falls
    Make sure your child carries a flashlight and consider adding reflective tape to costumes for better visibility. 
    Don't wear costume contact lenses as they can cause injury or infection to your eyes.
    Don't allow children under the age of 12 trick-or-treat without adult supervision.
    If children over 12 are going out alone, make sure you know where they are going, what route they will take and have them check in regularly.
    Instruct your children to only visit houses that are well lit and to NEVER enter a house.
    Stay on the sidewalk and don't cut across lawns, which may have hidden tripping dangers.
    Remind your children not to eat their treats until you have had a chance to check them over at home.

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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1735Wed, 29 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    The HUB marketplace is here!

    hub.ouhsc.edu

    Introducing the new student marketplace!  The “HUB” is an online marketplace designed by students for students.  Logon on today!  HUB.OUHSC.EDU

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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1649
    Audiologist Joins OU Physicians Audiologist Ariel Adams Bennett, Au.D., has established her practice with OU Physicians. She will sees pediatric and adult patients.
          
    Bennett earned her certificate of clinical competence from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. She earned her doctorate in audiology from Gallaudet University, Washington, D.C. She is a member of the Hearing Loss Association of America.
          
    Bennett sees patients at OU Children's Physicians, 1200 Children's Ave., and OU Physicians, 825 N.E. 10th St., Oklahoma City. For appointments, call 405-271-7559. 
          
    With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
          
    OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.

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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1733Tue, 28 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Student U-card | Win Prizes! | Various Events

    DLB Student Union

    The Student U-cards are a fun and interactive way for students to experience all that this campus has to offer along with gaining chances to win FREE STUFF! Come to events sponsored by HSC Student Affairs, Suite 300, to receive your card or punches on your card.

    5 punches=FREE T-Shirt

    10 punches=Entry to win an IPad Mini

    Come and enjoy your time here at HSC!!!

    Student UCARD Eligible Events:

    ·         #HSCWOW

    ·         Sweets in the Suite

    ·         Leadership Lunch

    ·         Social Hour

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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1730
    Urologic Cancer Specialist Joins Cancer CenterKelly Stratton, M.D., a urologic oncologist, has established his medical practice with the Stephenson Cancer Center. Urology is the surgical specialty dealing with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and disorders of the urinary tract and reproductive organs. 
          
    As a urologic oncologist, Stratton will diagnose and treat urologic cancers primarily through minimally invasive and robotic surgeries.  
          
    Stratton completed a urologic oncology fellowship and served as chief fellow at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, N.Y. He completed a urology residency at Vanderbilt University, Nashville. He earned his medical degree from the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and earned his undergraduate degree at OU in Norman. 
          
    Stratton is a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Society of Urologic Oncology and American Urologic Association.
          
    Stratton sees patients at the Stephenson Cancer Center, 800 N.E. 10th Street. For an appointment, call (405) 271-4088. 
            
    Oklahoma's only comprehensive academic cancer center, the Stephenson Cancer Center is a nationally recognized leader in research and patient care. The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top five cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead centers nationally in the Institute's National Clinical Trials Network. In collaboration with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is decreasing the burden of cancer in Oklahoma by supporting innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research. The Stephenson Cancer Center has 180 research members who are conducting over 100 cancer research projects at institutions across Oklahoma. This research is supported by $28.7 million in annual funding from the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society and other sponsors.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1724Mon, 20 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Pediatric Nephrologist Joins OU Children's PhysiciansAnjali Nayak, M.D., a pediatric nephrologist, has established her medical practice with OU Children's Physicians. Nephrologists specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders affecting the kidneys. 
          
    Nayak works with pediatric patients needing kidney transplantation. She is board certified in pediatrics and board eligible in pediatric nephrology. She completed a fellowship at Mattel Children's Hospital, University of California-Los Angeles, and a residency at Hershey Medical Center/Penn State University, Hershey, Pa. She earned her medical degree in India. 
          
    Nayak is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics, American Society of Nephrology and American Society of Pediatric Nephrology.
          
    For an appointment with any of the OU Children's Physicians pediatric nephrologists, call (405) 271-4211.
          
    OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
          
    Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
          
    OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1723Mon, 20 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    A Killer Among Us
    Ebola has been in the news a lot lately, and surveys show it is stirring concern for people all across the United States. The actual risk of developing Ebola is low here, though, while the risks associated with another deadly disease, blood clots, are significant. Yet, few are aware of them.

    Millions of people die every year from blood clots. They are the underlying cause of the world's top three cardiovascular killers: heart attack, stroke and venous thromboembolism (blood clots in the legs and lungs).

    Now, the dean of the University of Oklahoma College of Public Health and other experts worldwide have joined in a new international initiative to raise awareness about blood clots and ultimately save lives. 

    Monday, Oct.13, marked the first World Thrombosis Day. The primary focus of this year's initiative is venous thromboembolism, which impacts hundreds of thousands of Americans every year.

    "There are too many people unaware of the facts about blood clots in the leg and lungs and their life-threatening consequences – and too many people are dying a preventable death," said Gary Raskob, Ph.D., dean of the OU College of Public Health and internationally known for his research into the prevention and treatment of blood clots. "The worldwide effort for World Thrombosis Day is designed to increase awareness among the public and among health care professionals about the importance of thrombosis as a major contributor to death and disability worldwide."
     
    Judy Belk of Mustang learned firsthand just how dangerous those clots can be. The Mustang woman loves to garden, loves her family and loves to travel too. It was after returning from a trip to the mountains with her husband, though, that something went terribly wrong. 

    "I was standing at the kitchen sink and I noticed I was having trouble breathing and I thought, well it will pass, you know. And I went ahead and finished cleaning up. And by the time I walked into the living room, I said ‘Glen, I'm having trouble breathing. And of course, being in the medical field, he said, ‘All right, let's go.' And so he got up, and we made a flying trip to the hospital," Belk said.
     
    At the hospital, doctors quickly diagnosed Belk with pulmonary embolism. She actually had two clots, one in each lung. Belk was immediately hospitalized and treatment begun.
     
    "If we can implement treatment quickly, which mostly consists of anti-clotting medication, the prognosis for patients is excellent. The key is getting a prompt, accurate diagnosis," Raskob said.

    Blood clots can strike at any age. Vascular medicine experts say one of the challenges in preventing blood clots is how few people know about factors that may put them at risk.

    "The most common risk factors actually have to do with being in the hospital or immediately following being in the hospital whether that be for a medical illness like pneumonia or heart failure or surgery, especially orthopedic surgery. People who have been in serious accidents are also at increased risk," said Dr. Suman Rathbun of the OU Vascular Center.

    Other risk factors include:

    -          Not moving for long periods of time
    For example, having to stay on bed rest or traveling on long trips without getting up and walking around are examples of being immobile that can increase your risk.
    -          Older age
    The older we get the greater our risk for developing a blood clot.
    -          Family history 
    If someone in your family has had a blood clot, you may be at increased risk, especially if you add one of the three risk factors we just discussed like undergoing surgery or being in the hospital.
    -          Using estrogen medications like oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy
    -          Being pregnant or having recently given birth.
     
    Since two-thirds of blood clots occur during or following hospitalization or surgery, health care providers and hospitals have grown increasingly aware of the importance of taking steps to prevent clots. 
     
    "Many hospitals, including ours, do a risk assessment with every admission. The goal is to assess the patient's risk of getting clots, then prescribe either mechanical means to prevent clots, like pumps and support hose or medicine that can prevent clots," Rathbun said.
     
    At OU Medical Center, clot prevention begins as soon as a physician enters his or her patient into the electronic hospital system.
     
    "The first screen that comes up says your name, maybe the patient's name, and then what you are being admitted for. So, you are being admitted for pneumonia. You are being admitted for cancer surgery," said Dr. Curt Steinhart, medical director at OU Medical Systems. "Then it will say who the doctor is that you are being admitted to. Then right after that, it says VTE prophylaxis. VTE is short for venous thromboembolism, or blood clot. You can't order the diet. You can't order the lab work. You can't order the medications. You can't order anything.  You can't close your orders out without making a decision about whether you are going to use prophylaxis against deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism."
     
    Raskob said the World Thrombosis Day effort is about empowering individuals to take steps to protect themselves too.

    "It is critical for people to: one, know the risk factors; two, be proactive – talk to your doctor about your risk and ask about preventing blood clots, especially if you are admitted to a hospital or are having surgery; and three, know the symptoms and signs of a deep-vein thrombosis and of a pulmonary embolism and seek medical attention promptly if you experience them," he said.

    Information on warning signs, risk factors, prevention and ways the public can get involved are available at www.worldthrombosisday.org 
     
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1718Sat, 11 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Targeting Breast Cancer Tumors with LightResearchers at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center hope to shed new light on breast cancer treatment with fewer side effects.

    They have developed an innovative treatment strategy that utilizes photodynamic therapy and site-specific chemotherapy to precisely target breast cancer tumors in an effort to maximize the therapeutic efficacy and to minimize the body's exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs.

    Youngjae You, Ph.D., a member of the Stephenson Cancer Center and associate professor with the OU College of Pharmacy, has just received a new three-year, $550,000 federal grant to advance the work.

    His laboratory-based research targets a specific type of breast cancer known as triple-negative. That means the tumor does not have any of the three most common known cancer-growth factors – estrogen, progesterone or the HER-2 gene. Thus, hormonal and HER-2 targeted therapies do not work for such cancers.

    "Chemotherapy, the treatment of cancer with chemical drugs, is the one of the ways to treat triple negative breast cancer," You said. "Unfortunately, even when their breast tumors are localized, patients experience side effects from chemotherapy, like weakness, nausea, vomiting and pain, because their entire body is exposed to the drug."

    Not only can these side effects be difficult for patients, they may also limit the amount of a chemotherapy drug that can be given.

    "By being able to combine chemotherapy with photodynamic therapy using our novel linker technique, we have found that we are able to have a site-specific and controlled delivery of the drugs to the tumor without all the negative side effects caused by systemic chemotherapy," he said. 

    Photodynamic therapy is a treatment that uses special drugs, called photosensitizing agents that only work after they have been activated by near infrared light. 

    You and his team first deliver inactive chemotherapy drugs directly to a tumor. Next, near infrared light is introduced to the tumor site by way of a fiber optic cable. The light breaks the chemical bonds that keep the drugs from working. With those bonds broken, the drugs become active and kill cancer cells at the tumor site.

    "What makes this approach so unique is that we discovered a groundbreaking way to break these bonds with near infrared light using a special chemical bond we developed," You said. "It allows us to keep the drugs outside the tumor inactive and release the active chemotherapy drug at the tumor site, which minimizes the body's exposure to the chemotherapeutic drugs."

    The use of near infrared light also offers a number of advantages. Unlike ultraviolet light and high-energy radiation like X-rays or gamma rays, near infrared light is not toxic. It can also reach up to a few centimeters (about an inch) inside tissues within the body, which ultraviolet light and short visible light cannot do.

    Ultimately, the goal is to find a way to deliver effective cancer-fighting therapeutics while reducing bothersome side effects for patients.

    "If our strategy is successful, it will be a significant advancement toward an effective and innovative treatment option that has minimal side effects for localized and inoperable advanced triple negative breast cancers," You said.

    Collaborating with You on the project are Michael Ihnat, Ph.D. and Sukyung Woo, PhD, both colleagues at the OU College of Pharmacy.  
    The research is funded by U.S. Department of Defense grant W81XWH-14-1-0392.

    ABOUT THE STEPHENSON CANCER CENTER 
    Oklahoma's only comprehensive academic cancer center, the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma is a nationally recognized leader in research and patient care. The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top five cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead centers nationally in the Institute's National Clinical Trials Network. In collaboration with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is decreasing the burden of cancer in Oklahoma by supporting innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research. The Stephenson Cancer Center has 180 research members who are conducting over 100 cancer research projects at institutions across Oklahoma. This research is supported by $28.7 million in annual funding from the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society and other sponsors.

    ABOUT THE OU COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
    The University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy is committed to contributing to society through state-of-the-art education and research as well as modern, innovative pharmacy practices and services. With more than 4200 graduates since 1896, the college helps ensure the public need for safe and effective pharmaceutical care is met.  
    ]]>
    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1716Tue, 07 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Dean Elected Treasurer of OrganizationP. Kevin Rudeen, Ph.D., FASAHP, dean of the University of Oklahoma's College of Allied Health since 2007, has been elected treasurer of the Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions. Rudeen has served as an elected member of the Board of Directors for the organization since 2008. The national organization of more than 100 academic institutions, two professional associations and approximately 200 individual members is dedicated to addressing critical matters affecting allied health education, research and service. 

    As treasurer, Rudeen will provide guidance and counsel to the Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions Board of Directors as to how to be the best stewards of the organization's resources and investments.

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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1712Tue, 07 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Pediatrician Joins PracticePediatrician Natalie Hart, M.D., has established her practice with OU Children's Physicians. 
          
    Hart completed a pediatric residency at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. She earned her medical degree from the University of Nebraska College of Medicine, Omaha.
          
    She is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics.
          
    Hart sees patients in the OU Children's Physicians building, 1200 Children's Ave. For appointments, call (405) 271-6827.
          
    OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
          
    Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
          
    OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1704Fri, 26 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Pediatrician Joins PracticePediatrician Reid Hebert, M.D., has established his practice with OU Children's Physicians. 
          
    Hebert completed his pediatric residency at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where he also earned his medical degree. He earned his bachelor's degree with special distinction in zoology from OU in Norman.
          
    He is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics.
          
    Hebert sees patients in the OU Children's Physicians building, 1200 Children's Ave. For appointments, call (405) 271-6827.
            
    OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
          
    Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
          
    OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1703Fri, 26 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Cancer Specialist Joins Stephenson Cancer CenterMohamad Khawandanah, M.D., a hematologist-oncologist, has established his medical practice with the Stephenson Cancer Center. 
          
    Khawandanah has a specific interest in diagnosing and treating patients with acute leukemia, lymphoma, chronic leukemia, myeloid disorders, hematologic malignancies and those needing bone marrow transplant. He is board certified in internal medicine.
          
    Khawandanah completed a hematology-oncology fellowship at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where he also completed his internal medicine residency. He earned his medical degree in Jordan. 
          
    Khawandanah is a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society of Hematology and American College of Physicians.
          
    Khawandanah sees patients at the Stephenson Cancer Center, 800 N.E. 10th Street. For an appointment, call (405) 271-8299. 
            
    Oklahoma's only comprehensive academic cancer center, the Stephenson Cancer Center is a nationally recognized leader in research and patient care. The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top five cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead centers nationally in the Institute's National Clinical Trials Network. In collaboration with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is decreasing the burden of cancer in Oklahoma by supporting innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research. The Stephenson Cancer Center has 180 research members who are conducting over 100 cancer research projects at institutions across Oklahoma. This research is supported by $28.7 million in annual funding from the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society and other sponsors.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1702Fri, 26 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Senior Health Care in Oklahoma Receives $11.5 Million in Support The University of Oklahoma Health and Sciences Center has been awarded a three-year $11.5 million grant by the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation to further efforts to improve the health of seniors in Oklahoma.

    The grant will provide critical funding for the Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative, a senior health initiative of the OU College of Medicine's Department of Geriatric Medicine.

    "As the population of our state and nation continues to age, it is vital that academic-based medical centers, like ours, remain at the forefront of advancing scientific knowledge of the aging process and evidence-based treatment of health concerns that may arise with advancing age," said Dr. M. Dewayne Andrews, senior vice president and provost of the OU Health Sciences Center and executive dean of the OU College of Medicine. "The Donald W. Reynolds Foundation has been a valued ally as we work to improve senior health in Oklahoma and we are honored to be the recipients of this generous grant."

    The Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative aims to support Oklahoma's seniors through a variety of programs that center on three key objectives:

            Increasing senior and caregiver access to inter-professional geriatric care
            Providing health education to consumers as well as health care providers
            Optimizing Oklahoma's current health and aging policy

    The new grant will fund phase two of the initiative, which expands and builds on previous successes of the program. 

    "The Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative has helped us establish important inroads as we work to improve senior health statewide," said Dr. Laurence Rubenstein, chairman of the Donald W. Reynolds Department of Geriatric Medicine at OU. "The Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative has opened three Centers of Healthy Aging across the state already, allowing us to serve seniors in 47 of Oklahoma's 77 counties. With this grant, we will be able to add additional centers, expanding our reach to every county in the state."

    The Centers of Healthy Aging serve as hubs providing both clinical care and health education to citizens in the region.

    "We look forward to being able to expand our work through the Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative," said Dr. Andrew Dentino, Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative director and vice chairman of the Department of Geriatrics. "Already, this initiative has achieved great success for seniors in our state. We welcome the opportunity to further our educational activities for both seniors and health care professionals, to continue work already underway to better assess the needs and interests of older Oklahomans, to increase awareness of geriatric health concerns overall, and to help train the next generation of senior health care providers."

    Surveys conducted through the Initiative have verified a need for more trained senior health caregivers in Oklahoma. The new grant will enable initiative leaders to implement a certified home caregiver training program aimed at increasing the number of qualified caregivers in the workforce and also better equipping family members to perform necessary tasks when they become caregivers to elderly loved ones.

    The grant also provides the funding required to add three satellite centers to better address the needs of seniors in some of the most underserved areas of the state.  

    "The Reynolds Foundation is immensely proud of the critical work that the Donald W. Reynolds Department of Geriatric Medicine is doing to bring geriatrics medical care and education to the state of Oklahoma," said Steve Anderson, president, Donald W. Reynolds Foundation. "Our goal is to improve the health of older people living throughout Oklahoma and the Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative is doing just that."

    The Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative was launched on the premise that good health is key to successful aging. The Institute is focused on increasing access to healthcare and providing important health education to seniors, their caregivers and healthcare providers statewide.

    The Donald W. Reynolds Foundation is a national philanthropic organization founded in 1954 by the late media entrepreneur for whom it is named. Headquartered in Las Vegas, it has committed over $258 million nationwide through the Aging and Quality of Life Program.
     
    ###
     
    The media briefing on this topic can be viewed at: http://www.universityhospitalsauthority.com/streaming/viewer/   
     
    Video for download by the media of the briefing along with support footage is available at this link: 
    Senior Health.mov
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1699Wed, 24 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    OU Internal Medicine Resident Receives National Research AwardA medical resident at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center is one of only 10 nationwide selected for a prestigious research award. 

    Hossein Maymani, M.D., chief internal medicine resident at the OU College of Medicine, is recipient of the American Society of Hematology’s 2014 HONORS Award. 

    The HONORS (Hematology Opportunities for the Next Generation of Research Scientists) Award is designed to encourage medical students and residents who have a demonstrated interest in conducting hematology research, but who have not yet entered a hematology-related training program, to pursue a research career in the field. 

    "This award from the American Society of Hematology is a tribute to the dedication of Dr. Maymani and to the quality of his research projects here at the OU Health Sciences Center," said M. Dewayne Andrews, M.D., MACP, OU Health Sciences Center senior vice president and provost and executive dean of the OU College of Medicine. "Advancing excellence in medical research is among our top goals at the OU College of Medicine, and programs like this one help young researchers gain a stronger foothold in the field. We congratulate Dr. Maymani on this achievement." 

    As part of the award, Maymani will receive a $5,000 stipend to conduct research with a mentor on a short- or long-term research project. In addition, he will receive another $1,000 annual stipend for two years to support his attendance at the annual American Society of Hematology meeting. 

    The Society hopes the HONORS award ultimately will help develop the next generation of hematologists by supporting hematology research and introducing them to valuable contacts within the hematology research community.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1695Thu, 18 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Maternal Fetal Medicine Specialist Joins OU PhysiciansJennifer McIntosh, D.O., has established her medical practice with OU Physicians Prenatal Diagnostic Center.
          
    McIntosh sees women who are experiencing complications during pregnancy. She completed a maternal fetal medicine fellowship at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. She completed an obstetrics-gynecology residency at Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, and earned her doctorate in osteopathic medicine at Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, East Lansing. She earned a master's degree in clinical and translational science through the OU College of Medicine. 
          
    McIntosh is a member of the Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.
          
    OU Physicians maternal fetal medicine specialists see patients on the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Campus. For an appointment with an OU Physicians maternal fetal medicine specialist, call (405) 271-5400.
          
    With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
          
    OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1693Wed, 17 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Cardiologist Joins PracticeCardiologist Nicole Tintera Tran, M.D., has established her medical practice with OU Physicians. She is also an assistant professor of medicine for the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.  
          
    Tran is board certified in internal medicine. She is board eligible in cardiovascular disease, echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography and nuclear cardiology.
          
    Tran completed a fellowship in cardiovascular medicine at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where she also completed a residency. She earned her medical degree at the OU College of Medicine and earned her bachelor's degree at OU in Norman.
          
    Tran sees patients on the OU Health Sciences Center campus at 825 N.E. 10th Street, suite 2500. For appointments, call (405) 271-7001.
          
    With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
          
    OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1692Wed, 17 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Children's experts note uptick in respiratory virus infections: State and Federal Health Officials Studying Whether Illnesses Are Related to EV-D68Experts at The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center are reporting an increase in the number of hospitalizations from respiratory viruses while state and national health officials are trying to identify if those illnesses are related to a virus that has sickened more than 1,000 children across the Midwest. 
     
    From Aug. 1-28 this year, 115 patients have tested positive for rhinovirus/enterovirus illnesses compared to 75 during the same time last year. Most of those patients were at The Children's Hospital, though some were also at OU Medical Center, the adult hospital. Some of those patients were sent to the pediatric intensive care unit at Children's. 
     
    Health officials in Oklahoma are currently testing samples from Children's patients to determine if any are Enterovirus 68, or EV-D68, a viral illness that has been identified most recently in Missouri, where it sickened more than 300 children, sending as many as 15 percent to the intensive care unit at a pediatric hospital in Kansas City. 
     
    Dr. Robert Welliver, chief of pediatric infectious diseases at The OU College of Medicine, said health care experts have been watching the activity of Enterovirus 68 for some time. 

    "Enterovirus 68 has been present in the U.S. for some time, but at very low levels of activity. More extensive outbreaks have occurred in the Philippines and in Japan, where fatal infections have occurred in smokers and persons with asthma," he said. "Increased activity has been noted in the past month in the Midwest, and while some cases have been severe, none have been fatal to our knowledge."

    Enteroviruses are very common viruses, and there are more than 100 types of enteroviruses. Most people infected with enteroviruses have no symptoms or only mild symptoms, but some infections can be serious. EV-D68 usually can cause mild to severe respiratory illness requiring only treatment of the symptoms. Some people with severe respiratory illness caused by EV-D68 may need to be hospitalized. 
     
    Background
     
    •         Enteroviruses are very common viruses; there are more than 100 types. 
     
    •         It is estimated that 10 to 15 million enterovirus infections occur in the United States each year.
     
    •         Most people infected with enteroviruses have no symptoms or only mild symptoms, but some infections can be serious. 
     
    •         Infants, children and teenagers are most likely to get infected with enteroviruses and become sick.
     
    •         Most enterovirus infections in the United States occur seasonally during the summer and fall.
     
    Enterovirus D68:

    •         Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) infections are thought to occur less commonly than infections with other enteroviruses.
     
    Symptoms

    •         EV-D68 usually can cause mild to severe respiratory illness. However, the full spectrum of EV-D68 illness is not well defined.

    Transmission

     EV-D68, like other enteroviruses, appears to spread through close contact with infected people.
     
    Treatment

     There is no specific treatment for EV-D68 infections.
     •  Many infections will be mild and self-limited, requiring only treatment of the symptoms.
     •  Some people with severe respiratory illness caused by EV-D68 may need to be hospitalized and receive intensive supportive therapy.

     No anti-viral medications are currently available for treating of EV-D68 infections.
     
    Prevention

     There are no vaccines for preventing EV-D68 infections. 
     
     Ways to help reduce the risk of getting infected with EV-D68:
     •  Wash hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds, especially after changing diapers
     •  Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands
     •  Avoid kissing, hugging, and sharing cups or eating utensils with people who are sick
     •  Disinfect frequently touched surfaces, such as toys and doorknobs, especially if someone is sick

    Guidance to Parents

     Children with cold like symptoms that experience difficulty breathing, are asked to consult with their family physician for further evaluation.

     There will not be a daily count of cases as  U.S. healthcare professionals are not required to report known or suspected cases of EV-D68 infection to health departments because it is not a reportable disease in the United States. Also, CDC does not have a surveillance system that specifically collects information on EV-D68 infections.


    SOURCE: The Oklahoma State Department of Health and CDC

    Do you have questions about whether you or your loved one’s symptoms are emergency room worthy? Read more here

     
    ###
     

    THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL AT OU MEDICAL CENTER
    The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center has 326 inpatient beds and is the only freestanding comprehensive children's hospital in Oklahoma. The Children's Hospital's pediatric staff  have years of specialized pediatric training with education, research and technology to treat conditions ranging from cardiothoracic and oncology-related illnesses to neonatal specialty care and pediatric solid-organ transplants. The Children's Hospital's 88-bed Neonatal Intensive Care Unit provides the highest level of neonatal care in Oklahoma. The Children's Hospital was one of the first hospitals in the country to provide total, comprehensive care for mothers and their newborns all in the same building. Additionally, the Women's & Newborn Center at The Children's Hospital provides family-centered newborn care for all types of deliveries—from routine to complicated, high-risk births—and offers the most comprehensive obstetrics program in the state. The Children's Hospital is nationally ranked by U.S. News and World Report in its 2013 survey. To find out more, visit www.oumedicine.com/childrens or www.facebook.com/okchildrens.
     
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1683Mon, 08 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Radiologist Joins OU Physicians William Vanlandingham, M.D., an interventional radiologist, has established his medical practice at OU Physicians. An interventional radiologist utilizes minimally invasive image-guided procedures to diagnose and treat diseases.
          
    Vanlandingham performs a wide range of interventional procedures, including arterial and venous angiography (a procedure to help view the arteries and veins), hepatobiliary interventions (relating to the liver, gall bladder and bile ducts), interventions in transplant patients as well as numerous gastrointestinal, genito-urinary and other percutaneous procedures (using a needle to access inner organs). He has a specific interest in interventional cancer treatments. 
          
    Vanlandingham is board certified in diagnostic radiology. He completed a vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at the University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, and a residency at the University of Missouri, Kansas City. He earned his medical degree from the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and his undergraduate degree from Oklahoma State University. 
          
    Vanlandingham is a member of the Society of Interventional Radiology, American Board of Radiology and Radiological Society of North America.
          
    With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state’s largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
          
    OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region’s future physicians.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1678Fri, 05 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Neurologist Joins OU Physicians Neurologist Christi Pendergraft, M.D., has established her medical practice with OU Physicians. Neurologists diagnose and treat disorders of the central nervous system such as headache, seizure, stroke, dementia and Parkinson’s disease.
          
    Pendergraft has a specific interest in treating headache patients. She completed her neurology residency at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where she also earned her medical degree. She earned her undergraduate degree at OU in Norman.  
          
    She is a member of the American Academy of Neurology.
          
    Pendergraft sees patients on the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center campus. For an appointment with an OU Physicians neurologist, call (405) 271-3635. 
          
    With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state’s largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
          
    OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region’s future physicians.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1676Thu, 04 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Electrophysiologist Joins PracticePaul J. Garabelli, M.D., an electrophysiologist, has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. He has also been named an assistant professor at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. 
          
    Electrophysiologists are physicians who specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of heart rhythm disorders. Garabelli specializes in implanting and removing pacemakers and defibrillators and performing catheter ablations to treat conditions such as atrial fibrillation.
          
    Garabelli is board certified in cardiology and internal medicine and board eligible in electrophysiology. He completed a clinical electrophysiology fellowship and a cardiology fellowship at the OU College of Medicine. He completed his internal medicine residency and served as chief resident at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston. He earned his medical degree from Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, N.C.
          
    Garabelli sees patients at the OU Physicians Building, 825 N.E. 10th Street. For an appointment with an OU Physicians electrophysiologist or cardiologist, call (405) 271-7001.
          
    With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state’s largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
          
    OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region’s future physicians.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1675Thu, 04 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Neurologists Join OU PhysiciansNeurologist Aaron Farrow, M.D., has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. Neurologists diagnose and treat disorders of the central nervous system such as headache, seizure, stroke, dementia and Parkinson’s disease.
          
    Farrow will see all general neurology patients and is specifically interested in diagnosing and treating patients with cerebrovascular disease and multiple sclerosis. He completed a neurology residency at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where he also earned his medical degree. He earned his undergraduate degree at Southern Nazarene University, Bethany, graduating magna cum laude.
         
    Farrow is a member of the American Academy of Neurology.
          
    OU Physicians neurologists see patients on the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center campus. For an appointment, call (405) 271-3635. 
          
    With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state’s largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
          
    OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region’s future physicians.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1674Thu, 04 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Awareness Day AnnouncedThe Center on Child Abuse and Neglect at OU Children's Physicians is joining the cause to increase awareness of the risks of drinking alcohol while pregnant. In recognition of International Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Day, Governor Mary Fallin has proclaimed September 9, 2014, as Oklahoma Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Day.    
          
    "The date -- ninth month and ninth day – symbolizes the nine-month gestation period," explained Tatiana Balachova, Ph.D., of the Center on Child Abuse and Neglect. Balachova is also an associate professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.
          
    The U.S. Surgeon General advises pregnant women and women who are considering becoming pregnant to abstain from alcohol consumption to eliminate alcohol-exposed pregnancies, referred to as Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders. Yet it is estimated that 40,000 babies are born each year with the disorders. 
          
    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders are caused by a woman drinking alcohol during pregnancy. Alcohol in the mother's blood passes to the baby through the placenta and the umbilical cord. 
          
    "When a woman drinks alcohol, so does her baby," Balachova explained. "There is no known safe amount or type of alcohol to drink during pregnancy. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders can impact children's physical, mental, behavioral, or cognitive development."
          
    The most recognized condition of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, fetal alcohol syndrome , is characterized by growth deficiencies, central nervous system disabilities and specific facial characteristics. It is the most preventable form of intellectual disability. The number of children born with fetal alcohol syndrome alone is comparable to spina bifida or Down syndrome.
         
    Balachova added that to prevent Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorderss, a woman should not drink alcohol while she is pregnant or if she might be pregnant. This is because a woman often does not know she is pregnant for up to four to six weeks after conception. In the U.S., nearly half of all pregnancies are unplanned. 
          
    "If a woman is drinking alcohol during pregnancy, it is never too late to stop drinking," Balachova said. "Because brain growth takes place throughout pregnancy, the sooner a woman stops drinking, the safer it will be for her and her baby."
          
    For more information on alcohol use during pregnancy and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, visit www.cdc.gov/fasd and http://www.nofas.org/.
          
    OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
          
    Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
          
    OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1669Wed, 03 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Neurologist/Neurointerventionalist Joins OU Physicians Neurologist Ankur Garg, M.D., has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. Neurologists diagnose and treat disorders of the central nervous system such as stroke, brain hemorrhage, headache, seizure, dementia, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and more. 
          
    Garg has additional experience in endovascular treatment of stroke, aneurysms, vascular malformations and fistulae (groups of abnormal blood vessels that connect arteries to veins) as well as carotid disease for both adult and pediatric patients.
          
    Garg is board certified in vascular neurology and general neurology. His training includes fellowships in endovascular surgical neuroradiology (neurointervention) and vascular neurology at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where he also completed his neurology residency. He earned his medical degree in India.
          
    Garg is a member of several academic societies including the Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology, Society of Neurointerventional Surgery, World Federation of Interventional and Therapeutic Neuroradiology, American Heart Association and American Academy of Neurology.
          
    OU Physicians neurologists see patients on the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center campus. For an appointment, call (405) 271-3635. 
          
    With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
          
    OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1668Wed, 03 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    OU Vice Provost Receives Award for Achievements in Faculty DevelopmentValerie N. Williams, vice provost for academic affairs and faculty development at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, has been selected as the recipient of the 2014 Carole J. Bland Phronesis Award from the Association of American Medical College's Group on Faculty Affairs. Williams received the award at the group's professional development conference recently in Boston.

    According to the group, "Williams, whose excellence as an innovator, a nurturer/mentor, a leader and an educator/academician, as well as her regional and national impact in the areas of faculty affairs and faculty development, exemplifies the criteria established for the award."

    The association's Group on Faculty Affairs builds and sustains faculty vitality in medical schools and teaching hospitals by supporting faculty affairs deans and administrators in their development and implementation of institutional policies and professional development activities. The Carole J. Bland Phronesis Award serves to honor members of the faculty affairs community who exemplify the spirit of phronesis – acting for the welfare of others without thought for the self; seeking and enabling heroically the development and success of others – through dedicated and selfless promotion of faculty vitality.

    Since coming to the OU Health Sciences Center in 1989, Williams has served in a variety of faculty development and leadership posts, including as associate dean for faculty affairs in the OU College of Medicine and interim associate dean for academic programs in the OU College of Nursing. In her current capacity, Williams sponsors and guides faculty development and teaches in the OU Health Sciences Center's interprofessional faculty development program which includes faculty from each of the OU health professions colleges and the graduate college. She also has remained active as a principal investigator, and during the past 10 years has served as private investigator or sponsor for more than $18 million in competitively awarded grants and contracts.

    Williams served as chair of the Association of American Medical College's board of directors in 2013. The association serves and leads the academic medicine community to improve the health of all, and represents all 141 accredited U.S. and 17 accredited Canadian medical schools; nearly 400 major teaching hospitals and health systems, including 51 Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers; and 90 academic and scientific societies.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1662Fri, 29 Aug 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Family Structure Impacts Risk for Obesity in ChildrenThe family structure in which a child is raised is significantly associated with behaviors that put him or her at risk for obesity, according to a study by researchers at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.

    Childhood obesity is a growing issue in the United States. Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control show that obesity has more than doubled in children and quadrupled in adolescents in the past 30 years. Despite this, few studies have examined the relationship between family structure, environment and behaviors linked to obesity, said principal investigator Susan Sisson, Ph.D., an assistant professor of behavioral nutrition in the OU College of Allied Health.

    "Before the study we did not know if one size fit all, but we now know some kids are at a higher risk for obesity-promoting behaviors because the risk is not equally distributed among all the family structures," Sisson said.

    For instance, siblings appear to provide some protection against obesity. In the study, the presence of a sibling was generally associated with lower obesity-promoting behaviors and more physical activity, regardless of marital status. However, the presence of a sibling did not completely eliminate the risk of engaging in obesity-promoting behaviors for a child in a single-mother or blended household.

    "This is one of the first studies of its kind in the United States. Previous studies show children of divorced parents are more likely to be overweight, but we wanted to see if children living with single mothers and in two-parent, blended families were more at risk for engaging in obesity-promoting behaviors," Sisson said.

    A novel finding of the study is that living in a household with two parents does not necessarily protect against behaviors that increase the risk for childhood obesity. 
    In fact, if the family is a blended one, the risk increases substantially.  

    The findings provide new insights on data originally collected through the National Survey of Children's Health. That survey was administered to more than 55,000 households with children under the age of 17 nationwide between April 2007 and July 2008.

    Family structure was defined by the number of siblings and the parent's marital status. Each household was classified into one of four categories: two-parent biological or adoptive, two-parent blended family (divorced, but remarried), single mother, and other. 

    Behaviors and environments linked to increased risk for obesity in the study included elevated television-watching time, the presence of a television in the child's bedroom, infrequent family meals and insufficient physical activity. 

    Study results showed children living in a two-parent, blended family were 75 percent more likely to have a TV in their bedroom and children in single-mother households were 49 percent more likely compared to children who live with biological or adoptive parents. 

    Children in two parent, blended homes were also more likely than any other category to watch an elevated amount of television.

    Previous studies have linked increased television-viewing time and having a television in the bedroom to a higher risk for obesity in children. 

    "Parents highly underestimate the amount of time their children are watching TV, especially if children have a television in their bedroom," Sisson explained.

    The study also found children in single-mother homes were 28 percent more likely to have infrequent family meals. 

    "We are not placing value on living circumstances," said Sisson of the research, "but we want to understand the risks associated with these."

    Sisson said while childhood obesity may not be the first thing parents worry about when facing divorce or remarriage, the study points to the need to focus more attention on their children's health in these circumstances. 

    "When a family separates, it is a difficult time for families. If these obesogenic behaviors surface as a coping pattern, we want to be able to give these families tools to help children better cope," she said.

    Authors of the study noted that more research needs to be done to examine other living situations, like children who live with their grandparents.

    They say their ultimate goal is to learn more so that interventions can be tailored to each child and family to prevent obesity and better ensure that all children grow into healthy adults. 

    The study results are published in the Journal of Preventive Medicine.
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1661Thu, 28 Aug 2014 00:00:00 GMT
    Leading in Leadership Education
    A new $250,000 gift will place the University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy at the heart of leadership in the education of future pharmacists in the United States. The five-year gift from CVS Caremark will fund development of a pharmacy leadership institute at the college.
     
    The gift funds a leadership initiative that is a first of its kind. It will allow the college to build upon curriculum already in place to create the new leadership institute. 
     
    "We are very excited to lead a national effort in leadership education and training for pharmacy students," said Associate Dean for Student Affairs Jane E. Wilson, Ph.D. "We foresee our institute becoming the major leadership development resource for pharmacy schools across the country."
     
    About 50 students at the college are currently enrolled in a three-year program that involves curriculum aimed at training future pharmacists to be outstanding leaders in both the field of pharmacy and in their communities. 
    "This curriculum teaches students how to be effective change agents with the ability to guide others in implanting positive change that best serves the profession and its patients," said Michael Smith, Ph.D., assistant dean for Tulsa Operations and coordinator of the leadership degree option at the OU College of Pharmacy.

    In addition to establishing the new national leadership institute, the OU College of Pharmacy plans to establish a national summer symposium for leadership development for pharmacy students across the United States. College leadership hopes to have the summer leadership program up and running by 2015.

    The gift will also fund development of the CVS Caremark Leadership Library, a resource library serving students and colleges of pharmacy nationwide. 
     
    "The long-term plan is to extend leadership education and open it up to students studying for careers in other health care professions, like medicine, nursing and dentistry," Wilson said. 
     
     "We are pleased to be able to support OU College of Pharmacy's pursuit of educating innovative pharmacy leaders for tomorrow," said CVS Caremark's Director of Pharmacy Recruiting Amy Holland, Pharm.D. "As pharmacy evolves and we see changes in healthcare, it is truly important to prepare students to become clinicians, managers and leaders.  I look forward to our continued relationship as we strive for excellence together."
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    https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1660Wed, 27 Aug 2014 00:00:00 GMT
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