OUHSChttps://news.ouhsc.edu/Thought for the Day

“The art of being happy lies in the power of extracting happiness from common things.” ~Henry Ward Beecher

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PeopleSoft Human Capital (self-service) unavailablehttps://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1914Thu, 28 May 2015 00:00:00 GMTStephenson Cancer Center Recruits Tobacco Prevention and Control Researchers for Leadership PositionsTwo tobacco control researchers, Jennifer Irvin Vidrine, Ph.D., and Damon Vidrine, Dr.P.H., have been recruited to key leadership positions at the Stephenson Cancer Center located at the University of Oklahoma. Jennifer Vidrine will serve in the newly established role of Deputy Director for Tobacco Research and oversee initiatives to advance the center’s tobacco research center. Damon Vidrine will serve as co-leader for the Cancer Health Disparities Program.  
Two tobacco control researchers, Jennifer Irvin Vidrine, Ph.D., and Damon Vidrine, Dr.P.H., have been recruited to key leadership positions at the Stephenson Cancer Center located at the University of Oklahoma. Jennifer Vidrine will serve in the newly established role of Deputy Director for Tobacco Research and oversee initiatives to advance the center’s tobacco research center. Damon Vidrine will serve as co-leader for the Cancer Health Disparities Program.  
Jennifer Vidrine and Damon Vidrine were previously at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, where Jennifer was Associate Professor and Deputy Chair for the Department of Health Disparities Research, and Damon was Associate Professor in the Department of Behavioral Science. Both will join the OU Health Sciences Center faculty as Associate Professors in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine. 

“We are extremely pleased to have Jenny Vidrine and Damon Vidrine join our leadership team,” said Stephenson Cancer Center Director Robert S. Mannel, M.D. “Both bring a wealth of leadership and academic experience in addition to well-developed research programs that address the devastating problem of tobacco use and addiction, especially among at risk and high-need populations.” 

Jennifer Vidrine earned a doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology at the University of South Florida. She completed a clinical internship at Brown University and a postdoctoral fellowship in Behavioral Science at MD Anderson Cancer Center. As a faculty member at MD Anderson, she earned awards for mentorship and research activities. Jennifer’s research activities focus on developing strategies to reduce   tobacco-related health disparities, including innovative intervention and cessation programs that target tobacco use in specific populations. Her research has been supported by research grants from the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services.
      
Damon Vidrine earned his doctoral degree in public health at the University of Texas School of Public Health in Houston, Texas. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship at MD Anderson Cancer Center and joined has the faculty there in 2006. His research has been recognized with a faculty scholar award. Damon’s research activities focus on developing tobacco prevention and cessation strategies for at-risk populations, including low-income adults, HIV/AIDS patients, and inner city adults and youth. He has a particular interest in utilizing social media technologies to enhance tobacco prevention and cessation. Sponsors including the National Cancer Institute and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services have supported his research. 

Both Jennifer Vidrine and Damon Vidrine will be appointed Oklahoma TSET Research Scholars in recognition of the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust’s ongoing support for research to reduce the burden of cancer and tobacco in the state. 
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1915Tue, 26 May 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Understanding Obesity in American Indian Children in OklahomaWhen it comes to measuring obesity in American Indian youth in Oklahoma, the numbers are in and they show work still needs to be done.

That's the conclusion of recently published findings by researchers at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in collaboration with the Native Youth Preventing Diabetes Coalition.
 
Researchers found that 63 percent of the American Indian children surveyed met criteria for overweight or obese. That's twice the national average.

"We wanted to know why they were obese," said researcher Michelle Dennison-Farris, L.D. "What behaviors are contributing to this trend? And how can we change it?"

The findings are based on a study including 124 American Indian children, between the ages of 7 and 13,  in Oklahoma. It uncovered some behaviors that might be at least part of the problem, among those was the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages.

"We found that these kids consume about 309 calories per day of sugar-sweetened beverages, which offer little nutrition and extra calories. That is significantly higher than the national average of 178 calories per day of these beverages," said Dennison-Farris.
 
In addition to the increased consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks, the study revealed the amount of exercise in which the children engaged also had room for improvement. It is recommended that children get 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity each day. The majority of the children in the study, though, fell far short of that number.

"They were getting only about four and a half hours a week of moderate to vigorous physical activity; and only 32 of the children surveyed – that’s about one in four - were meeting the physical activity guideline of 60 minutes per day," said fellow researcher Susan B. Sisson, Ph.D. of the OU College of Allied Health.
 
"We were surprised by the outcomes, not only the amount of calories consumed by sugar-sweetened beverages, but the variety of beverages involved.  These children consumed high amounts of fruit drinks, sports drinks, sweetened tea and soda" said Dennison."
 
Sisson added the survey brings important insights into some of the reasons why American Indian children are at increased risk for certain diseases, particularly obesity and diabetes.
 
"Knowing the facts is just the start," said Sisson, adding that more research is needed to evaluate other circumstances that may impact health behaviors in these children, such as emotional or psychological factors and  peer pressure.

The research is published in the online edition of the Journal of Community Health.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1912Tue, 19 May 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Student Health Insurance Summer Enrollment | now through June 1

https://ouhsc.myahpcare.com/

All HSC students are required to have health insurance while attending the HSC Campus. You may either participate in the student sponsored health insurance policy, Academic HealthPlans, or show proof of acceptable insurance coverage by a recognized health insurance provider to your college Student Service Office. Open enrollment for student health insurance is going on now for students beginning classes June 1 (Summer enrollment).Enrollment will open for 2015-2016 plans in mid-Summer.  

Visit this link for more information https://ouhsc.myahpcare.com/ and this link to enroll: https://ouhsc.myahpcare.com/enrollment. Paper enrollment forms and the Summary of Benefits for the Academic HealthPlans Student Health Insurance Policy are available online at http://ouhsc.myahpcare.com/ or at HSC Student Affairs in the David L. Boren Student Union, Suite 300.

Please call Academic Health Plans at 1-888-924-7758 if you have questions about specific coverage or conditions.

 

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One Sooner Training | Summer dates

DLB Union 205 | 11:45 AM – 1 PM

It only takes one Sooner to speak out to end sexual misconduct on our campus.  Attend this one-hour training to learn how you can use your influence, popularity, and credibility to help end sexual assault and other forms of sexual misconduct on our campus.  Through informal peer-to-peer conversations you can correct rape myths, speak up when you see or hear a risky situation, educate your friends about protective behaviors, and share what resources are available on campus. 
The training will help you understand what types of sexual misconduct happen on OU’s campus and prepare you to share important information that can protect your community.  You are in the best position to positively influence and support our students. Participants will receive a One Sooner t-shirt and button after attending training.

Will you be the One?

Email your name, email address, OU affiliation, and t-shirt size to students@ouhsc.edu if you’d like to attend this training on June 29, July 14, or August 26 at 11:45 AM.

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Stopping a Silent KillerSaving women from an often silent killer is at the heart of new recommendations for ovarian cancer prevention from a top researcher and clinician at the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma as well as counterparts nationwide.

It’s estimated that almost 22,000 women in this country will learn they have ovarian cancer this year alone, and more than 14,000 women will die of the disease.  The disease often is not detected until it is in an advanced stage because there seldom are symptoms until it has already spread.  Since early detection through screening and symptom detection has failed to reduce mortality, top cancer researchers and clinicians nationwide now have issued a list of recommendations aimed at stopping the cancer before it starts. 

Joan Walker, M.D., gynecologic oncologist with the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, is lead author on the commentary published in Cancer.  Walker also holds the George Lynn Cross Research Professorship in Gynecology and Oncology  with the OU College of Medicine.  

“These new recommendations are aimed at helping save lives,” Walker said. “ Recent scientific breakthroughs have provided new insights into ovarian cancer  ̶  how it forms, how it spreads and who is at greatest risk.  With that knowledge, we felt it was important to make a strong recommendation to both the public and health care providers about how to best prevent ovarian cancer.”

The new recommendations include the use of oral contraceptives and instead of tubal sterilization, they recommend the removal of the fallopian tubes.  For women at high hereditary or genetic risk of breast and ovarian cancer, risk-reducing removal of the fallopian tubes and ovaries is recommended.   Finally, they recommend genetic counseling and testing for women with ovarian cancer and other high-risk family members.  Women identified with excess risk of ovarian cancer can reduce that risk to almost zero with the removal of the fallopian tubes and ovaries, but they experience premature menopause.

“For women with an average risk of developing ovarian cancer, we know that the use of oral contraceptives can cut their lifetime risk for ovarian cancer by 40 to 50 percent. The longer oral contraceptives are used, the greater the benefit and that benefit can last up to 15 years after a woman has stopped using oral contraceptives,” Walker said.

Tubal ligation, a procedure in which a woman’s fallopian tubes are blocked, tied or cut, has been associated with a 34 percent reduction in the risk of ovarian cancer in women at average risk for ovarian cancer.  With the new scientific evidence, the authors indicated they prefer the removal of the fallopian tubes as a preventive measure.   
“Studies have reported a 70 to 85 percent reduction in ovarian cancer as well as a 37 to 54 percent reduction in breast cancer in women at high hereditary risk with the removal of both the ovaries and fallopian tubes,” Walker said.  “Growing evidence shows that most type 2 ovarian cancers develop as a result of cellular changes in cells within the fallopian tubes.”
“This information is especially important for women at increased risk for breast and ovarian cancer. These recommendations are intended to help encourage an open discussion between women and their health care providers,” Walker said.

ABOUT THE STEPHENSON CANCER CENTER 
Oklahoma’s only comprehensive academic cancer center, the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma is a nationally noted leader in research and patient care. The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top five cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead centers nationally in the Institute’s National Clinical Trials Network. In collaboration with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is decreasing the burden of cancer in Oklahoma by supporting innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research. The Stephenson Cancer Center has 200 research members who are conducting over 100 cancer research projects at institutions across Oklahoma. This research is supported by $31.1 million in annual funding from the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society and other sponsors.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1908Thu, 30 Apr 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Pediatric Psychologist Joins OU Children's PhysiciansErin M. Hawks, Ph.D., has established her practice with OU Children’s Physicians. She has also been named an assistant professor with the department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. 

Hawks is a licensed clinical psychologist. She works with children, adolescents, adults and families suffering from a variety of disorders, including: anxiety; depression; sleep problems; tic disorders; trauma-related (i.e., PTSD); identity concerns; feeding and eating disorders, toileting problems, behavioral problems and adjustment issues. 

Hawks completed a fellowship in pediatric psychology at the OU College of Medicine. She  completed an American Psychological Association-accredited psychology internship at the Oklahoma Health Consortium, Norman. She earned her doctorate and master’s degrees in clinical psychology at Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant and earned her undergraduate degree at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. 

Hawks is a member of the: American Psychological Association; Society of Clinical Psychology; Society of Health Psychology; Society for the Psychological Study of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Issues; Society for the Psychological Study of Culture, Ethnicity and Race; Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology; Society of Pediatric Psychology; Association for Psychological Science; and the Oklahoma Psychological Association. 

Hawks sees patients on the OU Health Sciences Center campus. For an appointment with a pediatric psychologist, call (405) 271-4219.

OU Children’s Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma’s largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 

Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children’s Physicians are board certified in children’s specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 

OU Children’s Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can’t be helped elsewhere come to OU Children’s Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children’s Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children’s emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1907Wed, 29 Apr 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Spring 2015 OUHSC ConvocationsSpring Convocations
At the College Convocations, graduates will be recognized. Candidates’ names will be announced, they will have their picture taken, and they will be presented a diploma cover by their college dean. This is the time for candidates to celebrate with those in their college.

To have the complete graduation experience, graduates are expected to attend both Commencement and their Convocation!

Please contact the Graduation Office at (405) 325-0841 or at commencement@ou.edu if you have any questions about graduation.


College of Allied Health Convocation

7:00 p.m. Saturday, May 9, 2015

T. Howard McCasland Field House, 151 West Brooks Street, Norman, OK.

Candidates are asked to arrive at 6:00 p.m. at Lissa and Cy Wagner Hall.

There will be a reception prior to the ceremony from 4:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. in the Chesapeake Stadium Club, Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium, 180 W. Brooks Street, Norman, OK

Questions? Contact Paije Fauser at (405) 271-6588 or paije-fauser@ouhsc.edu or visit the College of Allied Health Web site at ah.ouhsc.edu/main/graduation.asp.


College of Dentistry Commencement

2 p.m. on Saturday, May 9, 2015

First United Methodist Church, 131 NW 4th St, Oklahoma City, OK. 

Candidates are asked to arrive at 1:00 p.m.

Questions? Contact Carla Lawson at (405) 271-5444 or via email at Carla-lawson@ouhsc.edu.


College of Dentistry Dental Hygiene Convocation

10:00 a.m. Saturday, May 9, 2015

First United Methodist Church, 131 NW 4th St, Oklahoma City, OK. 

Candidates are asked to arrive at 9:00 a.m.

There will be a reception immediately following Convocation at the First United Methodist Church.

Questions? Contact Kristy Jurko at (405) 271-4435 or via email at kristy-jurko@ouhsc.edu.


College of Medicine Commencement

10 a.m., Saturday, May 30, 2015

Civic Center Music Hall, 201 N. Walker, Oklahoma City, OK. 

No tickets issued for Commencement. Candidates are asked to arrive at 8:45 a.m.

There will be a reception immediately following the Commencement Ceremony.

Questions? Contact James F. Albertson at (405) 271-2316 or via email at james-albertson@ouhsc.edu.


College of Nursing Convocation

7:30 p.m., Saturday, May 9, 2015

Lloyd Noble Center, 2900 Jenkins Ave, Norman, OK.

Candidates are asked to arrive at 6:45 p.m. Candidates are required to register for Convocation. Registration forms can be found at nursing.ouhsc.edu/Current-Students/graduation.asp.

Questions? Contact Margaret A. Robinson at (405) 271-2428, ext. 49130 or via email at Margaret-A-Robinson@ouhsc.edu or visit nursing.ouhsc.edu/current-students/graduation.cfm.


College of Pharmacy Commencement

10 a.m., Saturday, June 6, 2015

Civic Center Music Hall, 201 N Walker Ave, Oklahoma City, OK. 

No tickets will be issued for Commencement. Candidates are asked to arrive at 9 a.m.

Questions? Contact Darla Puckett at (405) 271-6598 or via email at darla-puckett@ouhsc.edu.


College of Public Health Convocation

2:00 p.m. Saturday, May 9, 2015

Meacham Auditorium, Oklahoma Memorial Union, 900 Asp Ave. Norman, OK. 

Candidates are asked to arrive at 1:30 p.m.

There will be a reception immediately following Convocation in Beaird Lounge, located in the Oklahoma Memorial Union.

Questions? Contact Robin Howell at (405) 271-2308 or via email at Robin-howell@ouhsc.edu.


Health Sciences Center Graduate College Convocation

2:00 p.m., Saturday, May 9, 2015

David L. Boren Student Union, Room 170.  

Candidates are asked to arrive at 1:15 p.m. Registration is required. Candidates will register through the Graduate College.

There will be a reception immediately following Convocation in the Library Foyer and Faculty Atrium at the Robert M. Bird Library located at 1000 Stanton L. Young Blvd. just across the street from the David L. Boren Student Union.

Questions? Contact Karen Bentley at (405) 271-2085, or via email at Karen-bentley@ouhsc.edu.  
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1902Tue, 28 Apr 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Marathon Winner is OUHSC Staff MemberCongratulations to OU Health Sciences Center staff member Camille Herron, who was the female winner of Sunday’s Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon with a time of 2 hours, 54 minutes and 55 seconds. This is the third time Camille has won the Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon; her previous two wins were in 2012 and 2014. Camille works as a research laboratory technician for the OU College of Medicine. Her specialty is bone histomorphometry – making measurements of the bones. She works in the laboratory of Mary Beth Humphrey, M.D., Ph.D., whose research focus is osteoimmunology – understanding how the bone and the immune system work together.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1900Mon, 27 Apr 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Shining a New Light on Ovarian Cancer Treatment: New $1.5 million grant funds research aimed at better treatment with fewer side effectsA new $1.5 million grant to researchers at the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center will advance work focused on an illuminating new treatment for ovarian cancer.

The five-year National Institutes of Health grant funds research by Youngjae You, Ph.D., a member of the Stephenson Cancer Center and associate professor with the OU College of Pharmacy. His team is focused on the use of photodynamic therapy to target ovarian cancer tumors.

Ovarian cancer is one of the deadliest forms of cancer for women, claiming the lives of more than 14,000 women in the United States each year. This year, another 21,000 women will receive a new diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

Photodynamic therapy is a treatment that utilizes special drugs called photosensitizing agents. Those agents work only after they have been activated by light. By combining photodynamic therapy with site-specific chemotherapy drugs, You and his team hope to provide an extremely targeted cancer-fighting treatment for ovarian cancer – one that defeats the cancer while reducing many of the side effects often associated with traditional chemotherapy.

“The awarding of this NIH grant is a tribute to Dr. You and his research team and marks an important milestone for their work to help advance treatment for ovarian cancer. NIH funding of this kind is critical to our work at Stephenson Cancer Center as we further our mission to not only provide the best possible cancer care, but also to develop new, more effective treatments with fewer side effects for cancer patients,” said Robert Mannel M.D., director of the Cancer Center.

The grant awarded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health is an NIH Research Project Grant, commonly known as an R01 grant.  The R01 is the original and historically oldest grant mechanism used by the NIH, providing support for health-related research.    
  
“I am very excited about this grant. It funds important work aimed at helping save more lives,” said You.

Last year, You and his research team received a $550,000 Department of Defense grant to advance their research into photodynamic therapy in combination with site-specific chemotherapy as a treatment for breast cancer. This new grant from the NIH allows them to apply the same core principles to the treatment of ovarian cancer.

“Dr. You’s research greatly enhances the depth and breadth of expertise necessary to sustain a productive, collaborative drug discovery core in the OU College of Pharmacy,” said JoLaine R. Draugalis, R.Ph., Ph.D., dean of the college. “His pharmaceutical chemistry and cancer research themes as well as his photodynamic therapy approach generate excitement within the college and University.”

You said the challenge with ovarian cancer is that the cancer often is not discovered until it is in an advanced stage. Most women with ovarian cancer undergo surgery first, followed by chemotherapy to target any cancer cells that may remain following surgery.  Traditional chemotherapy, however, affects healthy cells as well as cancerous ones. You’s team hopes to change that by utilizing their new photosensitizing agents and activating them only after they have reached the tumor site.

"We can deactivate the toxicity and activity of the cancer-fighting drugs by using our special chemical bond and photosensitizer to make prodrugs,” You said. 

Prodrugs are drugs that are administered in an inactive form. The prodrug is delivered by intravenous injection, much like regular chemotherapy. The difference is that, unlike traditional chemotherapy drugs, prodrugs are not active until exposed to near infrared light, which is introduced only at the tumor site. The light breaks the chemical bond that prevents the drug from working, thereby activating its cancer-fighting ability. The goal is to kill the cancer cells while helping patients avoid the systemic side effects associated with standard chemotherapeutic drugs. 

“Dr. You has built upon his initial photodynamic therapy research to add an even more innovative component that decreases adverse effects and ensures that the drug is on target when activated,” Draugalis said.

Although laboratory studies must be completed before human trials begin, Dr. You said photodynamic therapy combined with site-specific cancer-fighting drugs may hold promise in the treatment of other cancers too, including head and neck, esophageal, lung and bladder cancers. 

The research funding is from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health (grant number 1R01GM113940-01).


ABOUT THE STEPHENSON CANCER CENTER 
Oklahoma’s only comprehensive academic cancer center, the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma is a nationally noted leader in research and patient care. The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top five cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead centers nationally in the Institute’s National Clinical Trials Network. In collaboration with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is decreasing the burden of cancer in Oklahoma by supporting innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research. The Stephenson Cancer Center has 200 research members who are conducting over 100 cancer research projects at institutions across Oklahoma. This research is supported by $31.1 million in annual funding from the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society and other sponsors.


ABOUT THE OU COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
The University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy is committed to contributing to society through state-of-the-art education and research as well as modern, innovative pharmacy practices and services. With more than 5300 graduates since 1896, the college helps ensure the public need for safe and effective pharmaceutical care is met.  

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1896Thu, 23 Apr 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Occupational Medicine Provider Joins OU PhysiciansCurtiss (sic) Farrell, M.D., has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. He is board certified in family medicine and is providing occupational medicine services through OU Physicians.  

Farrell completed a residency through the University of Iowa, Iowa City. He earned his medical degree from the University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. 

He is a member of the American Academy of Family Practice.     

OU Physicians Occupational Medicine is located on the OU Health Sciences Center campus at 825 N.E. 10th Street, Oklahoma City. For more information, call (405) 271-WORK (9675).

With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state’s largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 

OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region’s future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1892Wed, 22 Apr 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Pediatric Gastroenterologist Joins OU Children's PhysiciansCamilla Fraga-Lovejoy, M.D., a pediatric gastroenterologist, has established her medical practice with OU Children’s Physicians. Gastroenterologists specialize in treating diseases and disorders of the digestive system. 

Fraga-Lovejoy is board certified in pediatrics. She completed a pediatric gastroenterology fellowship at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. She completed a pediatric residency and internship at Miami Children’s Hospital, Florida, and earned her medical degree in Brazil.

She is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition.

For an appointment with any OU Children’s Physicians pediatric gastroenterologists, call (405) 271-6549.

OU Children’s Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma’s largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 

Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children’s Physicians are board certified in children’s specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 

OU Children’s Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can’t be helped elsewhere come to OU Children’s Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children’s Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children’s emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1891Wed, 22 Apr 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Dentist Joins OU Children’s PhysiciansSallie McLane Lau, D.M.D., has established her dental practice with OU Children’s Physicians Dentistry.

Lau had previously been in private practice in the Oklahoma City area since 2002.  She completed her dental residency at the University of Oklahoma College of Dentistry. She earned her dental degree at the University of Louisville School of Dentistry, Louisville, Kentucky. 

Lau is a member of the Special Care Dentistry Association, American Dental Education Association, Oklahoma Association of Women Dentists, Oklahoma Association of Pediatric Dentists, Southwest Society of Pediatric Dentistry, American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, Oklahoma Dental Association, Oklahoma County Dental Association and American Dental Association.

OU Children’s Physicians Dentistry offers general surgery services for both pediatric and adult patients. The clinic is located at 1200 Children’s Ave. For appointments, call (405) 271-4750.

OU Children’s Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma’s largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 

Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children’s Physicians are board certified in children’s specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 

OU Children’s Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can’t be helped elsewhere come to OU Children’s Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children’s Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children’s emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1890Wed, 22 Apr 2015 00:00:00 GMT
OU's 18th Annual Primary Care Update Set For May 5-9 in Midwest CityPhysicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners will learn current information on a broad range of topics related to primary care at the University of Oklahoma’s 18th Annual Primary Care Update, scheduled May 5 through 9 at the Sheraton Midwest City Hotel and Reed Conference Center, 5800 Will Rogers Road, in Midwest City.  Presented as a continuing medical education program, the conference is sponsored by the OU College of Medicine and the Irwin H. Brown Office of Continuing Professional Development.  

The conference will feature a variety of topics that focus on improving patient care by closing clinical practice gaps that have been identified across the country.  Topics will include updates on congestive heart failure, diabetes, stroke management, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and inflammatory bowel disease. In addition to nationally recognized faculty from the OU College of Medicine, guest speakers will include Dr. Aimee Garcia, associate professor at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, and Dr. Michael Nelson, health care consultant at the Studer Group in Pensacola, Florida.

Optional evening programs will give participants the opportunity for hands-on and skills-based education in X-ray interpretation; palliative and supportive care; joint injection techniques; and physician documentation. Additional workshops will be offered for health care professionals interested in earning basic life support and advanced cardiac life support certifications.    

For more information or for accommodations on the basis of disability, please call (405) 271-2350 or (888) 682-6348. To access the conference agenda/brochure and registration information, visit http://cme.ouhsc.edu.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1894Mon, 20 Apr 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Touchnet Maintenance Period (Friday, June 12, 2015)https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=383Fri, 15 May 2015 00:00:00 GMTLicensed Clinical Social Worked Joins OU PhysiciansAngela Lewis, L.C.S.W., a board-certified licensed clinical social worker, has established her practice with OU Physicians. She specializes in geriatric psychotherapy, death grief and loss issues as well as personality disorders and other psychiatric issues.

Lewis earned her degree in social work from the University of Oklahoma. 

For appointments with a licensed clinical social worker at OU Physicians, call (405) 271-4219.

With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state’s largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 

OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region’s future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1874Wednesday, April 06, 2015
Promising New Treatment Targets Deadly Brain Cancer

Patients with a deadly form of brain cancer now have access to a promising new treatment at the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.

The Stephenson Cancer Center is one of only a handful of institutions nationwide offering the novel treatment, which utilizes alternating electrical fields to target glioblastoma.

Although rare compared to cancers in other parts of the body, glioblastoma is the most common form of brain cancer. It is also a very aggressive one. There are about 20,000 new cases each year of glioblastoma. Last year, 68-year-old Warren Henry became one of them. 

“I was in the elevator at work and I kept getting confused about where I was and one of the guys noticed something was wrong and took me to the hospital in Tulsa right away,” Henry said. “I was in complete shock when they told me the diagnosis.”

Current treatments for glioblastoma – including brain surgery, radiation and chemotherapy – often are not successful at eliminating all of the cancer from the brain.  Without treatment, survival is typically just a few months. With standard treatments, the median survival climbs to more than a year. Now, doctors at the Stephenson Cancer Center hope to boost survival even more with the addition of a new weapon in the fight against this deadly cancer. It’s a completely novel approach using a new treatment delivery system.

“It is not a surgery. It is not chemotherapy. It is not radiation. It is actually a device that delivers low-intensity electrical fields to the tumor site through electrical transducers placed on the head,” said James D. Battiste, M.D., Ph.D., a neuro-oncologist with Stephenson Cancer Center and the OU College of Medicine’s Department of Neurology.

The electrical transducers are attached to the front, back and sides of the scalp with pads much like a giant bandage, connected by wires to a portable battery or power supply. Cancer cells thrive through rapid replication and division. The transducers are placed in such a way that they essentially scramble the tumor cell’s internal messaging, causing it to self-destruct.   

“So those proteins get messed up and they cannot divide their DNA between the two cells. When that happens, each cell gets a different amount of DNA than it really should. That confuses the cells and the cells usually either die or become dormant,” Battiste said. “If the tumor cells die, then the tumor can start to shrink.”

When first diagnosed, Henry was not very hopeful about his own survival.

“The first hospital I went to told me there was nothing they could do, but then I came to the Stephenson Cancer Center, and they said they could remove the tumor. Now, I am undergoing chemotherapy in conjunction with this new treatment, which is supposed to help keep the tumor from returning.” Henry said.

The treatment, which is worn more than 18 hours a day for best results, is already FDA approved for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma. Recently, though, researchers discovered that patients using the device, in combination with standard chemotherapy and radiation, lived longer than those offered standard treatments alone.  There also are few side effects.

“Mainly there is just a little bit of skin irritation, but we watch for that,” Battiste explained.

The treatment also offers new hope for patients who are not candidates for standard cancer therapies.

“One of the most exciting aspects of this new treatment is that we are going to be able to go to our patients who may be having trouble with traditional chemotherapy and offer them this new treatment that has very minimal side effects,” Battiste said.

He cautioned that patients with a pacemaker and some surgery patients are not candidates for the new therapy. However, research is ongoing to try to find ways to make it available to those patients, too. 

While the new system is not a cure for glioblastoma, specialists at Stephenson Cancer Center say it could well mark the beginning of something extraordinary in the realm of cancer treatment overall. 

“The hope is that in future research we may be able to apply this treatment to other types of brain tumors and even to other cancer sites outside of the brain. So in the future, it could be used on cancer in the lungs, the pancreas or even the ovaries,” Battiste said.



[Image: 68-year-old Warren Henry is fitted with a device that targets brain cancer in an entirely new way - utilizing low-intensity electrical fields to essentially short-circuit cancer cells’ ability to replicate. The Stephenson Cancer Center is one of only a handful of institutions nationwide offering the novel treatment for glioblastoma.]

ABOUT THE STEPHENSON CANCER CENTER 

Oklahoma’s only comprehensive academic cancer center, the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma is a nationally noted leader in research and patient care. The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top five cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead centers nationally in the Institute’s National Clinical Trials Network. In collaboration with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is decreasing the burden of cancer in Oklahoma by supporting innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research. The Stephenson Cancer Center has 180 research members who are conducting over 100 cancer research projects at institutions across Oklahoma. This research is supported by $28.7 million in annual funding from the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society and other sponsors.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1860Thu, 26 Mar 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Obstetrician-Gynecologist Joins OU PhysiciansObstetrician-Gynecologist Caroline Flint, M.D., has established her practice with OU Physicians. 
      
Flint completed her residency at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where she also earned her medical degree. She earned a bachelor's degree in zoology/biomedical sciences from the University of Oklahoma in Norman, graduating summa cum laude.
      
Flint is a member of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American College of Physicians.
      
For an appointment with any of the OU Physicians obstetrician-gynecologists, call (405) 271-9494.
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1849Thu, 12 Mar 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Anesthesiologist Joins OU Physicians German Barbosa-Hernandez, M.D., a board-certified anesthesiologist, has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. He has also been named an assistant professor of anesthesiology for the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. Anesthesiologists specialize in the use of drugs and other means to avert or reduce pain in patients, especially during surgery. 
      
Barbosa-Hernandez has specific experience in regional anesthesia (anesthesia affecting a large part of the body) and anesthesia administration during liver transplantation and cardiothoracic surgery.            
      
He completed a fellowship in anesthesia for liver transplantation at Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, and an anesthesia residency at MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland. He earned his medical degree in Bogota, Colombia. 
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1835Tue, 03 Mar 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Pediatric Anesthesiologists Join OU Children's PhysiciansEvangelyn Okereke, M.D., and Michelle Sheth, M.D., have established their medical practices with OU Children's Physicians. Sheth has also been named director of pediatric cardiovascular anesthesia services and is the only dedicated pediatric cardiac anesthesiologist in Oklahoma. Anesthesiologists specialize in the use of drugs and other means to avert or reduce pain in patients, especially during surgery. 
      
Both doctors are board certified in pediatric anesthesiology.  Okereke has been named an assistant professor and Sheth an associate professor at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. 
      
Okereke completed a pediatric anesthesiology fellowship at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. She completed an anesthesiology residency at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport. She earned her medical degree at Texas Tech Health Sciences Center School of Medicine, Lubbock. She is a member of the American Society of Anesthesiology and Society for Pediatric Anesthesia.
      
Sheth completed an anesthesiology fellowship at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, and a pediatric anesthesia fellowship at the University of Arkansas. She completed an anesthesiology residency at the University of Mississippi Medical Center and a pediatric residency in South Africa. She earned her medical degree in India. She is a member of the Society of Pediatric Anesthesia.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1834Tue, 03 Mar 2015 00:00:00 GMT
OU Research Targets Often Misdiagnosed Condition A new $200,000 grant will advance research at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center into a debilitating and often misdiagnosed neurological condition.

Dysautonomia International awarded the three-year grant to Dr. David C. Kem to support innovative research by his team aimed at better diagnosis and treatment of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, commonly called POTS. 

For people with POTS, the simple act of standing up can send the heart racing. In fact, an abnormally rapid heart rate upon standing is the hallmark of the condition. Other chronic symptoms (lasting more than six months) may include shortness of breath, weakness upon standing as well as exercise intolerance. POTS affects as many as a million people in the United States, most of them young women between the ages of 12 and 40. It has no cure and treatment options are limited.

Kem and his team, however, recently discovered the condition's cause may be rooted in the body's own immune system. They evaluated blood samples from POTS patients and identified specific antibodies, circulating proteins in the blood that fight infections, which appear to play a role in the syndrome.  
  
"These autoantibodies altered cell function. They interfere with normal changes in the system that controls the ability of blood vessels to become narrower and prevents the expected drop of blood pressure as the patient stands. The body compensates for this by increasing sympathetic nerve activity, which helps maintain blood pressure, but directly speeds up the heart rate," said Kem, the George Lynn Cross Research Professor of Medicine at the OU Health Sciences Center, and a member of its Heart Rhythm Institute. 

The new grant, the largest private grant ever awarded for POTS research, allows Kem's team to pursue development of a blood test for POTS and to work toward new treatments to lessen the burden of this condition on patients.

"Research is the key to understanding what causes POTs and other autonomic disorders, and how we can best treat them. Research gives us hope for a better future," said Lauren Stiles, president of Dysautonomia International and a POTS patient.

Stiles said the grant was made possible by a donor whose daughter suddenly developed POTS last year. The funding will create a new post-doctoral fellowship position that will be named the "Meghan's Hope POTS Research Fellowship" in honor of the donor's daughter.

"POTS is more than a minor annoyance for most patients. It often leads to significant life changes and limitations in normal life. We are grateful to Dysautonomia International and to the donor for their support of our work to help patients with this debilitating condition," Kem said. "It is especially touching to see someone who cares so much about their daughter's difficult lifestyle that they have funded an important and promising bit of locally generated research to pursue a cure."

Dysautonomia International is a not-for-profit patient advocacy organization focused on disorders of the autonomic nervous system. Since its founding in 2012, Dysautonomia International has funded research, physician education, patient empowerment and public awareness programs on POTS and other disorders of the autonomic nervous system. 
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1825Wed, 18 Feb 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Psychiatrist Joins OU PhysiciansCharles H. Dukes, M.D., a board-certified psychiatrist, has established his practice with OU Physicians. Psychiatrists are medical doctors specifically trained in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mental, emotional and behavioral disorders.
      
Dukes has a special interest in in psychosomatic medicine, working with patients suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and bipolar disorder. Prior to OU Physicians, he was on the faculty of Rocky Vista School of Osteopathic Medicine, Parker, Colorado, and Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Bryan. 
      
Dukes completed a psychiatry fellowship at Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina. He completed a psychiatry residency at Griffin Memorial Hospital, Norman, and a family medicine internship at St. Anthony Hospital. He earned his medical degree from Ross University School of Medicine, Dominica, West Indies.  He also severed as a Lutheran Pastor and completed a Master of Divinity degree at the Lutheran Theological Seminary, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

Dukes also serves as a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army Reserve Medical Corp, and has been presented numerous awards and medals throughout his military service.
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1823Wed, 18 Feb 2015 00:00:00 GMT
OU College of Nursing Ranks Among Best in Country for Online Advanced Degree Nursing Programs The University of Oklahoma College of Nursing is ranked as one of the best online advanced degree nursing programs for 2015 by U.S. News & World Report.   

"We strive to provide an exceptional learning environment at the OU College of Nursing," said Dean Lazelle Benefield, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN. "Online programs, extraordinary faculty, and outstanding clinical partnerships anchor our efforts to help students achieve their goals in nursing, to advance research, and to meet the growing need for exceptional nursing professionals in a variety of health care environments. It is a tremendous honor to be recognized by U.S. News and World Report for our efforts in online nursing education."

According to U.S. News, the rankings are determined by student engagement, faculty credentials and training, peer reputation, student services and technologies, and admissions selectivity. This is the third year the publication has ranked online programs. 

"We are very proud of the online programs we are able to offer at the OU College of Nursing," said Gary Loving, Ph.D., R.N., associate dean. "Currently, we have several online degree programs including Masters of Nursing Education, Doctor of Nursing Practice and PhD in Nursing. The online programs allow for great flexibility for students to better meet their individual needs as they work toward advanced degrees in nursing. For example, our Masters of Nursing Education program allows for multiple starting points for students."  

Under Loving's leadership, the college has utilized technology to provide distance learning opportunities for about 25 years. The college's online program offers a choice of part-time or full-time progression, and students are eligible to compete for merit-based scholarships. 

"The College of Nursing has highly trained faculty, and our students have the opportunity to engage with peers and faculty both in person and online while obtaining their degree," said Loving.

Benefield said that the college's online educational programs were created to help address the critical shortage of baccalaureate-prepared and advanced practice nurses in hospitals, clinics, schools and home care agencies across Oklahoma.

"To address this shortage, we must first address the root cause, and that is a shortage of qualified faculty ready to educate the next generation of nurses," Benefield said.

Toward that end, she explained the OU College of Nursing launched two of its online programs. These include  ̶  the PhD in Nursing program, the first in the state, which prepares graduates for roles in the academic world helping train the next generation of nurses, and the Doctor of Nursing Practice program, which prepares advanced practice nurses to meet the primary healthcare needs of Oklahomans.

"By making these programs available online, we exponentially expand access to the rich educational and scientific resources of our college and the OU Health Sciences Center for nursing students across Oklahoma, regardless of their physical location," said Benefield. 

The University of Oklahoma College of Nursing
The University of Oklahoma College of Nursing is nationally recognized, offering bachelor's, master's and doctoral level programs to those interested in starting or advancing a career in the profession of nursing. With locations in Oklahoma City, Lawton and Tulsa, the OU College of Nursing is the state's largest nursing program and is dedicated to continuing the leadership and academic excellence that have become synonymous with the University of Oklahoma. The College of Nursing is a part of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, a leader in education, research and patient care and one of only four comprehensive academic health centers in the nation with seven professional colleges. OU College of Nursing is Oklahoma's highest-ranked nursing school, according to U.S. News & World Reports.  To find out more, visit http://nursing.ouhsc.edu/. 
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1816Thu, 05 Feb 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Research Points to Novel Approach in Blood Clot Prevention Blood clots are an important concern in patients having major surgery, and preventive treatment with anti-clotting medication can cause excess bleeding. Now, research shows a new therapeutic approach may help reduce the risk of clots without increasing bleeding risks for these patients. 

Current therapies for the prevention of thrombosis (the medical term for blood clots) are effective. However, they also are associated with an increased risk of bleeding, said study co-author Gary Raskob, Ph.D., dean of the University of Oklahoma College of Public Health. 

"There is a need to continue to work to develop better, safer treatments. The goal, ultimately, is to find new treatments that effectively reduce the risk of blood clots in patients without increasing the risk of bleeding. This research looked at one such approach," Raskob said.  

The research, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, evaluated the safety and effectiveness of a drug that targets a specific clotting factor in the body – factor XI. Factor XI is a protein produced by the liver and found in the blood that helps the blood to clot following an injury to a blood vessel. The study drug reduces factor XI levels.

Although the exact role of factor XI in blood clots in humans is not known, there is evidence that patients with congenital factor XI deficiency have a reduced risk for venous thromboembolism, which includes deep vein thrombosis (blood clots in the deep veins of the legs) and pulmonary embolism (potentially fatal blood clots in the lungs).   

In the study, researchers looked specifically at patients undergoing total knee replacement because they have an increased risk of venous thromboembolism and routinely are given preventive therapy with an anticoagulant.

"Because factor XI is involved in the production of clots, but not in their initiation, we hypothesized that reducing factor XI levels would decrease the risk of venous thromboembolism after knee replacement surgery without increasing the risk of bleeding,"  Raskob said. 

In the clinical trial, approximately 300 patients undergoing total knee replacement procedures were randomized to receive either the research drug (in a 200 milligram or 300 milligram dose) or the anti-coagulant medication enoxaparin. 

The research drug was given starting 36 days prior to surgery with the final dose given three days after surgery.  The enoxaparin, on the other hand, was given for at least eight days after surgery.

The study found that patients receiving the higher dose of the research drug had the lowest occurrence of venous thromboembolism. In addition, patients receiving the research drug had fewer bleeding episodes than patients receiving enoxaparin. 

It is the first study to evaluate a therapeutic strategy that targets reduction of the expression of factor XI in the prevention of blood clots," Raskob said. "While further research is needed to validate the results, the findings point to a novel target for new therapies for blood clot prevention."
 
The study was funded by the manufacturer of the study drug.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1804Wed, 28 Jan 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Orthopedic Spine Surgeon Joins OU PhysiciansSantaram Vallurupalli, M.D., a fellowship-trained orthopedic spine surgeon, has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. He has also been named an assistant professor with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. 
      
Vallurupalli specializes in diagnosing and treating patients with spine injuries and illnesses. He completed a spine surgery fellowship at Cleveland Clinic Spine Center, Cleveland, Ohio. He completed an orthopedic surgery residency at the University of Missouri, Columbia. He completed a research fellowship in orthopedic surgery at the University of Missouri and the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston.
      
Vallurupalli is a member of American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the North American Spine Society.
      
He sees patients at the OU Physicians building, 825 N.E 10th Street, Oklahoma City. For an appointment with an OU Physicians orthopedic surgeon, call (405) 271-2663.
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1803Wed, 28 Jan 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Psychiatrist Named Chief of Child and Adolescent PsychiatryRebecca Susan Daily, M.D., F.A.P.A., D.F.A.A.C.A.P., has been named chief of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry for the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and sees patients as part of OU Children's Physicians. Psychiatrists are medical doctors specifically trained in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mental, emotional and behavioral disorders. 
      
Daily is board certified in adult psychiatry and child and adolescent psychiatry. She specializes in diagnosing and treating patients with Tourette's syndrome, autism spectrum disorders, trichotillomania (pulling one's own hair), developmental disorders, bruxism (grinding of the teeth) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.
      
Daily comes to OU Children's Physicians from Variety Care, where she was chief of pediatric psychiatry. Prior to Variety Care, she taught at the Kansas University School of Medicine in Wichita. She completed a fellowship in child and adolescent psychiatry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She completed her residency and internship and earned her medical degree at the University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham.
      
Daily is a Distinguished Fellow of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, is a Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and is a member of the Oklahoma Psychiatry Association and Oklahoma State Medical Association.
      
Daily sees patients on the OU Health Sciences Center campus. For an appointment with a pediatric psychiatrist, call (405) 271-5253.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1799Fri, 23 Jan 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Got the Flu? What's a Parent to Do?Have a child who's sneezing, coughing with that achy, feverish, can't-move-a-muscle feeling? You are not alone. We are in the midst of the "sick season" with a variety of viruses and a fair amount of the true flu, influenza, taking their toll on young and old alike.

"We are seeing just about everything in the clinics. This really is the season for all types of viruses to crop up. So we are seeing respiratory viruses, including influenza," said Casey Hester M.D., pediatrician with OU Children's Physicians. "We are also seeing the gastrointestinal bugs … so lots of vomiting, lots of diarrhea."

She said it's pretty much par for the course at this time of year. And while most illnesses can be managed at home without a visit to your health care provider, influenza is the exception. That's because medications that target flu need to be started within the first 48 hours. The challenge is knowing the difference between a wintertime bug and influenza.  Hester said there are some clear differences.

"With influenza, kids do tend to be a little sicker. They often have a high fever accompanied by severe body aches and pains. Another tell-tale sign of the flu is exhaustion," Hester said. "You don't feel like doing anything, even eating or drinking. Whereas, when you have a cold, you tend to have a low fever with mild fatigue, sneezing, coughing and a stuffy, runny nose."

If you suspect that your child may have the flu, it is very important to get them in to see a doctor as soon as possible.

"Early in the course, it is hard to tell if it is the flu because a lot of other viruses also start with fever, cough, congestion, body aches and chills," she said. "But the best thing to do is to call your doctor and get an appointment to be seen for a rapid flu test. If your child is seen early enough, within 48 hours of the onset of symptoms, there is a medicine that we can give to help reduce the duration and severity of the symptoms."

Hester and fellow pediatricians are seeing their fair share of flu, but they are also seeing a lot of cases of gastroenteritis or what most of us call the stomach flu. People with the stomach flu often have symptoms of diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, fever, headache, and sore muscles.

"One of the biggest things to keep an eye on when you have any type of stomach bug is dehydration. It can be a concern with flu too and it is one of the leading causes of hospitalization during the sick season," Hester said. 

She suggested that parents monitor fluid in and fluid out. 

"So if they are wearing diapers, that is easy. If they are older kiddos, you just want to have them check in with you and let you know when they go. You want at least two to three urinations in 24 hours. So if they are not producing any urine in eight hours, you may have a problem. Especially if your child is, listless, lethargic, really tired and just won't eat or drink anything," Hester said. 

Most children will recover from wintertime illness with just a little TLC at home. Here are a few tips to help them on the road to recovery:
•         Encourage your child to drink lots of clear fluids to prevent dehydration (water, electrolyte solutions, apple juice or warm broth).
•         Make sure he or she gets plenty of rest.
•         Saline nasal sprays can help relieve nasal congestion. (These are not nasal decongestant sprays which may make symptoms worse.)
•         Over-the-counter pain reliever/fever reducers may be helpful, but be sure to use "children's strength" and never give aspirin to any child under the age of 18 or ibuprofen to an infant 6 months of age or younger. 
•         DO NOT use over-the-counter, combination cough and cold medications in a child under 6 unless your doctor tells you to do so.
•         Keep your child home until he or she has been fever free for at least 24 hours.
•         Frequent hand washing can help prevent the spread of flu and other illness.
 
Remember antibiotics are not effective in fighting viruses. So your doctor will not prescribe these unless he or she suspects a secondary bacterial infection.
 
While most symptoms can be managed at home, Hester said any fever in an infant under two months of age can be serious. So be sure to have the baby seen by your health care provider right away. With older children, it is time to see the doctor if your child has a fever that lasts more than five days, is exceedingly tired, listless, lethargic of if you can't get him or her to eat or drink anything.  

For more information about the flu, including flu facts, treatment, information about vaccinations and more, visit www.oumedicine.com/flu.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1795Tue, 20 Jan 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Pediatric Cardiologist Joins OU Children's PhysiciansMary C. Niu, M.D., a board-certified pediatric cardiologist, has established her pediatric cardiology and electrophysiology practice with OU Children's Physicians. Electrophysiologists are cardiologists who have advanced training in arrhythmia and pacing.
      
Niu is board certified in pediatric cardiology and pediatrics. She completed fellowships in pediatric electrophysiology and pediatric cardiology at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston. She completed her pediatrics residency at Johns Hopkins Children's Hospital, Baltimore, and earned her medical degree from Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Ga.
      
OU Children's Physicians cardiologists and electrophysiologists see patients at the OU Children's Physicians Building, 1200 Children's Ave., in Oklahoma City. For appointments, call (405) 271-5530.  OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1788Wed, 07 Jan 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Radiologist Joins OU Physicians Jennifer Hinkle, M.D., a board-certified radiologist, has established her medical practice at OU Physicians. She has also been named an assistant professor of radiology for the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. Radiologists specialize in administering, supervising and interpreting MRI, CT, X-ray, ultrasound and other types of imaging studies. 
      
Hinkle completed training as a musculoskeletal radiologist and is experienced in arthrography (diagnostic testing which examines the inside of a joint) and peripheral joint therapeutic injections. She comes to OU Physicians from Jacobi Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, N.Y., where she was section chief of Musculoskeletal Imaging. 
      
Hinkle completed a musculoskeletal imaging fellowship and diagnostic radiology residency at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. She completed an internship and earned her medical degree with special distinction from the OU Oklahoma College of Medicine. She graduated summa cum laude with a bachelor's degree in biology from Southern Nazarene University, Bethany.
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1787Wed, 07 Jan 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Board-Certified Pathologist Joins OU PhysiciansBoard-Certified Pathologist John H. Eichhorn, M.D., has established his practice with OU Physicians. 
      
Eichhorn is board certified in anatomic and clinical pathology as well as cytopathology (the branch of pathology that studies and diagnoses diseases on the cellular level).
      
He completed clinical and research fellowships in surgical pathology, gynecologic pathology and cytopathology from Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, where for the next two decades he was employed as a full-time pathologist and on the faculty of Harvard Medical School. He also completed anatomic and clinical pathology residencies, serving as chief resident of anatomic pathology at Massachusetts General Hospital. He earned his medical degree from Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (formerly Rutgers Medical School), Piscataway, New Jersey.            
      
Eichhorn is a member of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists, American Society of Cytopathologists, United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, International Society of Gynecological Pathologists and College of American Pathologists.
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1786Wed, 07 Jan 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Leading Biomedical Ethics Prize Presented To Weill Cornell Medical College's Joseph FinsA noted scholar and author in the field of medical and palliative care ethics has been selected to receive the Patricia Price Browne Prize in Biomedical Ethics, administered by the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. This year's recipient is Joseph J. F