OUHSChttps://news.ouhsc.edu/Thought for the Day

Sooner Safety Week tip:

Call the Campus Police Department at 271-4911 for Escort Service if walking alone at night.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Anesthesiologist Joins OU Physicians German Barbosa-Hernandez, M.D., a board-certified anesthesiologist, has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. He has also been named an assistant professor of anesthesiology for the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. Anesthesiologists specialize in the use of drugs and other means to avert or reduce pain in patients, especially during surgery. 
      
Barbosa-Hernandez has specific experience in regional anesthesia (anesthesia affecting a large part of the body) and anesthesia administration during liver transplantation and cardiothoracic surgery.            
      
He completed a fellowship in anesthesia for liver transplantation at Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, and an anesthesia residency at MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland. He earned his medical degree in Bogota, Colombia. 
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1835Tue, 03 Mar 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Pathologists Join OU PhysiciansPathologists Carol Jones, M.D., and Jo Elle Peterson, M.D., have established their practices with OU Physicians. They have also been named assistant professors of pathology with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. 
      
Jones completed a geritourinary pathology fellowship at Indiana University, Indianapolis, and an anatomic and clinical pathology residency at the University of Arizona, Tucson. She earned her medical degree from the University of Central Florida, Orlando.
      
Peterson completed a neuropathology fellowship at The Methodist Hospital and MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston. She also completed a surgical pathology fellowship at The Methodist Hospital. She earned her medical degree from The University of Texas Medical School at Houston.
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1836Tue, 03 Mar 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Pediatric Anesthesiologists Join OU Children's PhysiciansEvangelyn Okereke, M.D., and Michelle Sheth, M.D., have established their medical practices with OU Children's Physicians. Sheth has also been named director of pediatric cardiovascular anesthesia services and is the only dedicated pediatric cardiac anesthesiologist in Oklahoma. Anesthesiologists specialize in the use of drugs and other means to avert or reduce pain in patients, especially during surgery. 
      
Both doctors are board certified in pediatric anesthesiology.  Okereke has been named an assistant professor and Sheth an associate professor at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. 
      
Okereke completed a pediatric anesthesiology fellowship at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. She completed an anesthesiology residency at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport. She earned her medical degree at Texas Tech Health Sciences Center School of Medicine, Lubbock. She is a member of the American Society of Anesthesiology and Society for Pediatric Anesthesia.
      
Sheth completed an anesthesiology fellowship at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, and a pediatric anesthesia fellowship at the University of Arkansas. She completed an anesthesiology residency at the University of Mississippi Medical Center and a pediatric residency in South Africa. She earned her medical degree in India. She is a member of the Society of Pediatric Anesthesia.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1834Tue, 03 Mar 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Muslim Patient Sensitivity Workshop | March 26

DLB Student Union 262 | 12-1 pm
Workshop topic: Strategies in dealing with Muslim patients, Identifying key health beliefs and practices within the Islamic community. See flyer for more information.

Speaker: Adam Soltani, executive director of Council on American-Islamic relations

Presented by: Muslim Health Professionals Student Association

Thursday, March 26, noon-1 PM, DLB Student Union Room 262

Free lunch while supplies last plus 1 hour of CHA community involvement credit (for those who qualify)
Contact: Anosha-Syeda@ouhsc.edu, Dalia-Bayaa@ouhsc.edu, Pinkey-Rahman@ouhsc.edu, Khalid-AlZubi@ouhsc.edu

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National Nutrition Month | March

See flyer for times and locations

The Nutritional Sciences students are working with Petra Colindres of OU Physicians to promote National Nutrition Month. There will be various activities around campus all month. The theme for week one is Byte into Technology. Activities will include a Raw Recipe Class at the Samis Education Center on March 3, samples of a healthy Mediterranean Spinach and Barley Salad at OU Medical Cafeteria on March 4, Student Dietetic Association trail-mix fundraiser on March 4, Farmer’s Market at OU Medicine on March 5, and samples of a healthy Quinoa Tabouli at Beaker’s Cafe in the Union on March 5. More details included in the flyer.

Contact: oufit@ouhsc.edu

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Tulakes Health Fair | March 5

Tulakes Elementary School | 6pm-8pm

Sponsored by College of Nursing Student Association

Contact Kate Alexander (kaitlin-alexander@ouhsc.edu) if you would like to volunteer to help with activities at the Tulakes Health Fair!

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Sooner Safety Week | March 2-6

Various times/locations

A week dedicated to all HSC community to discuss, learn and promote campus safety. 

All events include FREE lunch and take-away items while supplies last. See flyer.                              

Tuesday, March 3 ● Safety Blitz Fair

Browse, gather information and discuss safety strategies with members of the OUHSC campus.

Multiple campus groups and departments will sponsor booths allowing our campus community 

the opportunity to visit, learn and think SOONER. Browse the Blitz, get a t-shirt!
11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. ● DLB Student Union ● First Floor

Wednesday, March 4 ● HSC Campus Police Day

HSC Police Department and OKC Fire Department will display their Mobile Units.

West side of the College of Nursing Building

11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. ● David L. Boren Student Union

Quick and Safe Tips - Self Defense

Facilitated by HSC Campus Police Department: Self Defense Demonstration
Noon-12:45 p.m. ● DLB Student Union ● Room 172
 

Thursday, March 5 ● Run…Hide…Fight!

Will you know what to do in the event of an active shooter on campus?

Join us for dialogue, discussion and viewing of the video, Run…Hide…Fight!

Facilitated by Chief James Albertson, OUHSC Campus Police
Noon ● College of Allied Health Building ● Room 1117 ● Overflow Room 1047
 

Friday, March 6 ● One Sooner Can Make a Difference

11:45 a.m. - 1 p.m. ● DLB Student Union ● Room 262
Attend Bystander Behavior Training to receive an official OneSooner t-shirt.

Sponsors:
HSC Student Government Association, HSC Staff Senate, HSC Faculty Senate, Information Technology, Environmental Health and Safety, HSC Police Department, Bank SNB, HSC Provost Office, David L. Boren Student Union & HSC Student Affairs.

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. Please see www.ou.edu/eoo. For more information call HSC Student Affairs at (405) 271-2416 or visit www.ouhsc.edu.

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OU Research Targets Often Misdiagnosed Condition A new $200,000 grant will advance research at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center into a debilitating and often misdiagnosed neurological condition.

Dysautonomia International awarded the three-year grant to Dr. David C. Kem to support innovative research by his team aimed at better diagnosis and treatment of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, commonly called POTS. 

For people with POTS, the simple act of standing up can send the heart racing. In fact, an abnormally rapid heart rate upon standing is the hallmark of the condition. Other chronic symptoms (lasting more than six months) may include shortness of breath, weakness upon standing as well as exercise intolerance. POTS affects as many as a million people in the United States, most of them young women between the ages of 12 and 40. It has no cure and treatment options are limited.

Kem and his team, however, recently discovered the condition's cause may be rooted in the body's own immune system. They evaluated blood samples from POTS patients and identified specific antibodies, circulating proteins in the blood that fight infections, which appear to play a role in the syndrome.  
  
"These autoantibodies altered cell function. They interfere with normal changes in the system that controls the ability of blood vessels to become narrower and prevents the expected drop of blood pressure as the patient stands. The body compensates for this by increasing sympathetic nerve activity, which helps maintain blood pressure, but directly speeds up the heart rate," said Kem, the George Lynn Cross Research Professor of Medicine at the OU Health Sciences Center, and a member of its Heart Rhythm Institute. 

The new grant, the largest private grant ever awarded for POTS research, allows Kem's team to pursue development of a blood test for POTS and to work toward new treatments to lessen the burden of this condition on patients.

"Research is the key to understanding what causes POTs and other autonomic disorders, and how we can best treat them. Research gives us hope for a better future," said Lauren Stiles, president of Dysautonomia International and a POTS patient.

Stiles said the grant was made possible by a donor whose daughter suddenly developed POTS last year. The funding will create a new post-doctoral fellowship position that will be named the "Meghan's Hope POTS Research Fellowship" in honor of the donor's daughter.

"POTS is more than a minor annoyance for most patients. It often leads to significant life changes and limitations in normal life. We are grateful to Dysautonomia International and to the donor for their support of our work to help patients with this debilitating condition," Kem said. "It is especially touching to see someone who cares so much about their daughter's difficult lifestyle that they have funded an important and promising bit of locally generated research to pursue a cure."

Dysautonomia International is a not-for-profit patient advocacy organization focused on disorders of the autonomic nervous system. Since its founding in 2012, Dysautonomia International has funded research, physician education, patient empowerment and public awareness programs on POTS and other disorders of the autonomic nervous system. 
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1825Wed, 18 Feb 2015 00:00:00 GMT
OU Children's Physicians Hosts Dr. Seuss Birthday CelebrationOU Children's Physicians will host a Dr. Seuss Birthday Celebration, including a Green Eggs & Ham Breakfast, Monday, March 2, to benefit its Reach Out & Read program.
      
Breakfast will be served from 7 to 10 a.m., for a minimum donation of $5 to the Reach Out & Read program. Dr. Seuss-themed activities will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. All activities will be held in the Atrium of The Children's Hospital, 1200 Children's Avenue. The activities are open to the public. For more information, call (405) 271-4407.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1824Wed, 18 Feb 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Psychiatrist Joins OU PhysiciansCharles H. Dukes, M.D., a board-certified psychiatrist, has established his practice with OU Physicians. Psychiatrists are medical doctors specifically trained in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mental, emotional and behavioral disorders.
      
Dukes has a special interest in in psychosomatic medicine, working with patients suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and bipolar disorder. Prior to OU Physicians, he was on the faculty of Rocky Vista School of Osteopathic Medicine, Parker, Colorado, and Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Bryan. 
      
Dukes completed a psychiatry fellowship at Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina. He completed a psychiatry residency at Griffin Memorial Hospital, Norman, and a family medicine internship at St. Anthony Hospital. He earned his medical degree from Ross University School of Medicine, Dominica, West Indies.  He also severed as a Lutheran Pastor and completed a Master of Divinity degree at the Lutheran Theological Seminary, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

Dukes also serves as a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army Reserve Medical Corp, and has been presented numerous awards and medals throughout his military service.
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1823Wed, 18 Feb 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Touchnet Maintenance Period (Friday, March 6, 2015)https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=383Fri, 13 Feb 2015 00:00:00 GMTVolunteers needed for HSC Student Panel! | March 10

Dale Hall, Room 211, OU-Norman Campus | 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.

HSC students are needed to give current OU students perspective on what life as an

OUHSC student is really like. The panel is needed for the AHS 1400-Orientation to the

Health Professions course on the Norman campus.

Date: Tuesday, March 10:  12:30 to 1:20 p.m.

Location:  Dale Hall, Room 211,  OU-Norman Campus

Contact:  susan-tucker@ouhsc.edu   or 271-6588 for more information

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OU College of Nursing Ranks Among Best in Country for Online Advanced Degree Nursing Programs The University of Oklahoma College of Nursing is ranked as one of the best online advanced degree nursing programs for 2015 by U.S. News & World Report.   

"We strive to provide an exceptional learning environment at the OU College of Nursing," said Dean Lazelle Benefield, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN. "Online programs, extraordinary faculty, and outstanding clinical partnerships anchor our efforts to help students achieve their goals in nursing, to advance research, and to meet the growing need for exceptional nursing professionals in a variety of health care environments. It is a tremendous honor to be recognized by U.S. News and World Report for our efforts in online nursing education."

According to U.S. News, the rankings are determined by student engagement, faculty credentials and training, peer reputation, student services and technologies, and admissions selectivity. This is the third year the publication has ranked online programs. 

"We are very proud of the online programs we are able to offer at the OU College of Nursing," said Gary Loving, Ph.D., R.N., associate dean. "Currently, we have several online degree programs including Masters of Nursing Education, Doctor of Nursing Practice and PhD in Nursing. The online programs allow for great flexibility for students to better meet their individual needs as they work toward advanced degrees in nursing. For example, our Masters of Nursing Education program allows for multiple starting points for students."  

Under Loving's leadership, the college has utilized technology to provide distance learning opportunities for about 25 years. The college's online program offers a choice of part-time or full-time progression, and students are eligible to compete for merit-based scholarships. 

"The College of Nursing has highly trained faculty, and our students have the opportunity to engage with peers and faculty both in person and online while obtaining their degree," said Loving.

Benefield said that the college's online educational programs were created to help address the critical shortage of baccalaureate-prepared and advanced practice nurses in hospitals, clinics, schools and home care agencies across Oklahoma.

"To address this shortage, we must first address the root cause, and that is a shortage of qualified faculty ready to educate the next generation of nurses," Benefield said.

Toward that end, she explained the OU College of Nursing launched two of its online programs. These include  ̶  the PhD in Nursing program, the first in the state, which prepares graduates for roles in the academic world helping train the next generation of nurses, and the Doctor of Nursing Practice program, which prepares advanced practice nurses to meet the primary healthcare needs of Oklahomans.

"By making these programs available online, we exponentially expand access to the rich educational and scientific resources of our college and the OU Health Sciences Center for nursing students across Oklahoma, regardless of their physical location," said Benefield. 

The University of Oklahoma College of Nursing
The University of Oklahoma College of Nursing is nationally recognized, offering bachelor's, master's and doctoral level programs to those interested in starting or advancing a career in the profession of nursing. With locations in Oklahoma City, Lawton and Tulsa, the OU College of Nursing is the state's largest nursing program and is dedicated to continuing the leadership and academic excellence that have become synonymous with the University of Oklahoma. The College of Nursing is a part of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, a leader in education, research and patient care and one of only four comprehensive academic health centers in the nation with seven professional colleges. OU College of Nursing is Oklahoma's highest-ranked nursing school, according to U.S. News & World Reports.  To find out more, visit http://nursing.ouhsc.edu/. 
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1816Thu, 05 Feb 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Research Points to Novel Approach in Blood Clot Prevention Blood clots are an important concern in patients having major surgery, and preventive treatment with anti-clotting medication can cause excess bleeding. Now, research shows a new therapeutic approach may help reduce the risk of clots without increasing bleeding risks for these patients. 

Current therapies for the prevention of thrombosis (the medical term for blood clots) are effective. However, they also are associated with an increased risk of bleeding, said study co-author Gary Raskob, Ph.D., dean of the University of Oklahoma College of Public Health. 

"There is a need to continue to work to develop better, safer treatments. The goal, ultimately, is to find new treatments that effectively reduce the risk of blood clots in patients without increasing the risk of bleeding. This research looked at one such approach," Raskob said.  

The research, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, evaluated the safety and effectiveness of a drug that targets a specific clotting factor in the body – factor XI. Factor XI is a protein produced by the liver and found in the blood that helps the blood to clot following an injury to a blood vessel. The study drug reduces factor XI levels.

Although the exact role of factor XI in blood clots in humans is not known, there is evidence that patients with congenital factor XI deficiency have a reduced risk for venous thromboembolism, which includes deep vein thrombosis (blood clots in the deep veins of the legs) and pulmonary embolism (potentially fatal blood clots in the lungs).   

In the study, researchers looked specifically at patients undergoing total knee replacement because they have an increased risk of venous thromboembolism and routinely are given preventive therapy with an anticoagulant.

"Because factor XI is involved in the production of clots, but not in their initiation, we hypothesized that reducing factor XI levels would decrease the risk of venous thromboembolism after knee replacement surgery without increasing the risk of bleeding,"  Raskob said. 

In the clinical trial, approximately 300 patients undergoing total knee replacement procedures were randomized to receive either the research drug (in a 200 milligram or 300 milligram dose) or the anti-coagulant medication enoxaparin. 

The research drug was given starting 36 days prior to surgery with the final dose given three days after surgery.  The enoxaparin, on the other hand, was given for at least eight days after surgery.

The study found that patients receiving the higher dose of the research drug had the lowest occurrence of venous thromboembolism. In addition, patients receiving the research drug had fewer bleeding episodes than patients receiving enoxaparin. 

It is the first study to evaluate a therapeutic strategy that targets reduction of the expression of factor XI in the prevention of blood clots," Raskob said. "While further research is needed to validate the results, the findings point to a novel target for new therapies for blood clot prevention."
 
The study was funded by the manufacturer of the study drug.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1804Wed, 28 Jan 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Orthopedic Spine Surgeon Joins OU PhysiciansSantaram Vallurupalli, M.D., a fellowship-trained orthopedic spine surgeon, has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. He has also been named an assistant professor with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. 
      
Vallurupalli specializes in diagnosing and treating patients with spine injuries and illnesses. He completed a spine surgery fellowship at Cleveland Clinic Spine Center, Cleveland, Ohio. He completed an orthopedic surgery residency at the University of Missouri, Columbia. He completed a research fellowship in orthopedic surgery at the University of Missouri and the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston.
      
Vallurupalli is a member of American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the North American Spine Society.
      
He sees patients at the OU Physicians building, 825 N.E 10th Street, Oklahoma City. For an appointment with an OU Physicians orthopedic surgeon, call (405) 271-2663.
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1803Wed, 28 Jan 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Psychiatrist Named Chief of Child and Adolescent PsychiatryRebecca Susan Daily, M.D., F.A.P.A., D.F.A.A.C.A.P., has been named chief of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry for the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and sees patients as part of OU Children's Physicians. Psychiatrists are medical doctors specifically trained in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mental, emotional and behavioral disorders. 
      
Daily is board certified in adult psychiatry and child and adolescent psychiatry. She specializes in diagnosing and treating patients with Tourette's syndrome, autism spectrum disorders, trichotillomania (pulling one's own hair), developmental disorders, bruxism (grinding of the teeth) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.
      
Daily comes to OU Children's Physicians from Variety Care, where she was chief of pediatric psychiatry. Prior to Variety Care, she taught at the Kansas University School of Medicine in Wichita. She completed a fellowship in child and adolescent psychiatry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She completed her residency and internship and earned her medical degree at the University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham.
      
Daily is a Distinguished Fellow of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, is a Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and is a member of the Oklahoma Psychiatry Association and Oklahoma State Medical Association.
      
Daily sees patients on the OU Health Sciences Center campus. For an appointment with a pediatric psychiatrist, call (405) 271-5253.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1799Fri, 23 Jan 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Got the Flu? What's a Parent to Do?Have a child who's sneezing, coughing with that achy, feverish, can't-move-a-muscle feeling? You are not alone. We are in the midst of the "sick season" with a variety of viruses and a fair amount of the true flu, influenza, taking their toll on young and old alike.

"We are seeing just about everything in the clinics. This really is the season for all types of viruses to crop up. So we are seeing respiratory viruses, including influenza," said Casey Hester M.D., pediatrician with OU Children's Physicians. "We are also seeing the gastrointestinal bugs … so lots of vomiting, lots of diarrhea."

She said it's pretty much par for the course at this time of year. And while most illnesses can be managed at home without a visit to your health care provider, influenza is the exception. That's because medications that target flu need to be started within the first 48 hours. The challenge is knowing the difference between a wintertime bug and influenza.  Hester said there are some clear differences.

"With influenza, kids do tend to be a little sicker. They often have a high fever accompanied by severe body aches and pains. Another tell-tale sign of the flu is exhaustion," Hester said. "You don't feel like doing anything, even eating or drinking. Whereas, when you have a cold, you tend to have a low fever with mild fatigue, sneezing, coughing and a stuffy, runny nose."

If you suspect that your child may have the flu, it is very important to get them in to see a doctor as soon as possible.

"Early in the course, it is hard to tell if it is the flu because a lot of other viruses also start with fever, cough, congestion, body aches and chills," she said. "But the best thing to do is to call your doctor and get an appointment to be seen for a rapid flu test. If your child is seen early enough, within 48 hours of the onset of symptoms, there is a medicine that we can give to help reduce the duration and severity of the symptoms."

Hester and fellow pediatricians are seeing their fair share of flu, but they are also seeing a lot of cases of gastroenteritis or what most of us call the stomach flu. People with the stomach flu often have symptoms of diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, fever, headache, and sore muscles.

"One of the biggest things to keep an eye on when you have any type of stomach bug is dehydration. It can be a concern with flu too and it is one of the leading causes of hospitalization during the sick season," Hester said. 

She suggested that parents monitor fluid in and fluid out. 

"So if they are wearing diapers, that is easy. If they are older kiddos, you just want to have them check in with you and let you know when they go. You want at least two to three urinations in 24 hours. So if they are not producing any urine in eight hours, you may have a problem. Especially if your child is, listless, lethargic, really tired and just won't eat or drink anything," Hester said. 

Most children will recover from wintertime illness with just a little TLC at home. Here are a few tips to help them on the road to recovery:
•         Encourage your child to drink lots of clear fluids to prevent dehydration (water, electrolyte solutions, apple juice or warm broth).
•         Make sure he or she gets plenty of rest.
•         Saline nasal sprays can help relieve nasal congestion. (These are not nasal decongestant sprays which may make symptoms worse.)
•         Over-the-counter pain reliever/fever reducers may be helpful, but be sure to use "children's strength" and never give aspirin to any child under the age of 18 or ibuprofen to an infant 6 months of age or younger. 
•         DO NOT use over-the-counter, combination cough and cold medications in a child under 6 unless your doctor tells you to do so.
•         Keep your child home until he or she has been fever free for at least 24 hours.
•         Frequent hand washing can help prevent the spread of flu and other illness.
 
Remember antibiotics are not effective in fighting viruses. So your doctor will not prescribe these unless he or she suspects a secondary bacterial infection.
 
While most symptoms can be managed at home, Hester said any fever in an infant under two months of age can be serious. So be sure to have the baby seen by your health care provider right away. With older children, it is time to see the doctor if your child has a fever that lasts more than five days, is exceedingly tired, listless, lethargic of if you can't get him or her to eat or drink anything.  

For more information about the flu, including flu facts, treatment, information about vaccinations and more, visit www.oumedicine.com/flu.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1795Tue, 20 Jan 2015 00:00:00 GMT
2015 Health Dash | March 28

HSC Campus | 9 AM

Register now for the annual Health Dash 5K, 10K and 1 Mile Fun Run! Registration includes an exclusive tech t-shirt. The day’s events will kick off on the HSC Campus with the 1 Mile Fun Run/Walk at 9:00 am, followed by the 5K and 10K races at 9:30 am. 

All proceeds will benefit Good Shepherd’s Clinic on the Move, a mobile clinic with full medical and dental suites. With Clinic on the Move, Good Shepherd Ministries will be able to provide free healthcare to communities throughout the state of Oklahoma. For more information about Clinic on the Move, visit http://goodshepherdokc.org/mobile-unit/.

Register online at https://www.signmeup.com/site/reg/register.aspx?fid=362VYH7
For more information about the Health Dash, like Health Dash 5K & 10K on Facebook. 

Happy Running!

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1792
Pediatric Cardiologist Joins OU Children's PhysiciansMary C. Niu, M.D., a board-certified pediatric cardiologist, has established her pediatric cardiology and electrophysiology practice with OU Children's Physicians. Electrophysiologists are cardiologists who have advanced training in arrhythmia and pacing.
      
Niu is board certified in pediatric cardiology and pediatrics. She completed fellowships in pediatric electrophysiology and pediatric cardiology at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston. She completed her pediatrics residency at Johns Hopkins Children's Hospital, Baltimore, and earned her medical degree from Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Ga.
      
OU Children's Physicians cardiologists and electrophysiologists see patients at the OU Children's Physicians Building, 1200 Children's Ave., in Oklahoma City. For appointments, call (405) 271-5530.  OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1788Wed, 07 Jan 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Radiologist Joins OU Physicians Jennifer Hinkle, M.D., a board-certified radiologist, has established her medical practice at OU Physicians. She has also been named an assistant professor of radiology for the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. Radiologists specialize in administering, supervising and interpreting MRI, CT, X-ray, ultrasound and other types of imaging studies. 
      
Hinkle completed training as a musculoskeletal radiologist and is experienced in arthrography (diagnostic testing which examines the inside of a joint) and peripheral joint therapeutic injections. She comes to OU Physicians from Jacobi Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, N.Y., where she was section chief of Musculoskeletal Imaging. 
      
Hinkle completed a musculoskeletal imaging fellowship and diagnostic radiology residency at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. She completed an internship and earned her medical degree with special distinction from the OU Oklahoma College of Medicine. She graduated summa cum laude with a bachelor's degree in biology from Southern Nazarene University, Bethany.
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1787Wed, 07 Jan 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Board-Certified Pathologist Joins OU PhysiciansBoard-Certified Pathologist John H. Eichhorn, M.D., has established his practice with OU Physicians. 
      
Eichhorn is board certified in anatomic and clinical pathology as well as cytopathology (the branch of pathology that studies and diagnoses diseases on the cellular level).
      
He completed clinical and research fellowships in surgical pathology, gynecologic pathology and cytopathology from Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, where for the next two decades he was employed as a full-time pathologist and on the faculty of Harvard Medical School. He also completed anatomic and clinical pathology residencies, serving as chief resident of anatomic pathology at Massachusetts General Hospital. He earned his medical degree from Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (formerly Rutgers Medical School), Piscataway, New Jersey.            
      
Eichhorn is a member of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists, American Society of Cytopathologists, United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, International Society of Gynecological Pathologists and College of American Pathologists.
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1786Wed, 07 Jan 2015 00:00:00 GMT
Leading Biomedical Ethics Prize Presented To Weill Cornell Medical College's Joseph FinsA noted scholar and author in the field of medical and palliative care ethics has been selected to receive the Patricia Price Browne Prize in Biomedical Ethics, administered by the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. This year's recipient is Joseph J. Fins, M.D., M.A.C.P., chief of the Division of Medical Ethics at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York.
The $10,000 prize, awarded every two years, was established to honor Oklahoma City community leader Patricia Price Browne by selecting an individual who "demonstrates the highest standards in the medical or professional ethics fields."
 
"The College of Medicine is proud to continue the legacy of Patricia Price Browne by awarding this prize to such a distinguished and accomplished individual as Dr. Joseph Fins," said M. Dewayne Andrews, senior vice president and provost for the OU Health Sciences Center and executive dean of the OU College of Medicine.
At Weill Cornell Medical College, Fins also serves as the E. William Davis Jr., M.D. Professor of Medical Ethics and is a professor of medicine, of medicine in psychiatry and of healthcare policy and research. 
Additionally, he is an attending physician and director of medical ethics at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, where he is the founding chair of the hospital's ethics committee. Fins also serves on the adjunct faculty of The Rockefeller University, where he is a senior attending physician at The Rockefeller University Hospital and co-directs the Consortium for the Advanced Study of Brain Injury at Weill Cornell and Rockefeller University.
Fins' current scholarly interests include ethical and policy issues in brain injury and disorders of consciousness; palliative care; research ethics in neurology and psychiatry; medical education; and methods of ethics case consultation.
A prolific author, his book credits including A Palliative Ethic of Care: Clinical Wisdom at Life's End (2006); a forthcoming book, titled Rights Come to Mind: Brain Injury, Ethics and the Struggle for Consciousness, will be published by Cambridge University Press in 2015. He is a co-author of the landmark 2007 Nature paper describing the first use of deep-brain stimulation in the minimally conscious state.
Fins is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2013, he was elected an Academico de Honor of the National Royal Academy of Medicine in Spain, one of only 18 so honored worldwide. Other awards and honors he has received include a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Investigator Award in Health Policy Research, a Soros Open Society Institute Project on Death in America Faculty Scholars Award and a Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation Visiting Fellowship. He has received additional grant support from the Dana, Buster and Katz foundations, among others.
Fins was appointed by President Bill Clinton to the White House Commission on Complementary and Alternative Medicine, and he currently serves on the New York State Task Force on Life and the Law by gubernatorial appointment. He also serves on the New York State Palliative Care and Education Council by appointment of the health commissioner. 
Fins earned his Bachelor of Arts degree with honors from the College of Letters at Wesleyan University and his medical degree from Weill Cornell Medical College. He completed his internal medicine residency and general internal medicine fellowship at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center.
Active in numerous professional and honorary medical, bioethics and societies, Fins is immediate past president of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities, former chair of the Hastings Center Fellows Council and now a member of the center's Board of Trustees. A trustee emeritus of Wesleyan University, he has been honored with its Distinguished Alumnus Award. 
Fins is a master of the American College of Physician and served as a governor of the college, which honored him with its Laureate Award. A fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine and was appointed to Germany's Council of the Europaische Akademie, he also is an elected member of the American Clinical and Climatological Association and Alpha Omega Alpha honor medical society.
Fins will receive the Browne Prize on May 13, 2015, during a visit to the OU Health Sciences Center campus. While at OU, he will be a guest lecturer for Pediatric Grand Rounds at Children's Hospital.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1784Tue, 23 Dec 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Neonatologist Joins OU Children's PhysiciansNeonatologist Marjorie M. Makoni, M.D., has established her practice with OU Children's Physicians. Neonatologists are physicians who specialize in the care of newborns. Along with other neonatologists at OU Children's Physicians, she offers comprehensive care for Oklahoma's premature and ill or injured full-term infants. 
      
Makoni has also been named an assistant professor with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. She is board certified in pediatrics and completed a fellowship in neonatal-perinatal medicine at the OU College of Medicine. She completed a residency at the University of Toledo, Ohio, and earned her medical degree at St. George's University School of Medicine, Grenada, West Indies.
      
Makoni is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1783Fri, 19 Dec 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Pediatric Emergency Medicine Physician Joins PracticeCourtney R. Shockley, M.D., a pediatric emergency medicine physician, has established her practice with OU Children's Physicians. She sees patients at The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. 
      
Shockley completed her pediatric residency at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where she also earned her medical degree. 
      
Shockley is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Medical Association Section on International Child Health.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1782Fri, 19 Dec 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Pay to Play – A New Approach in Diabetes PreventionIt's not unusual to pay a teenager in your neighborhood to mow your yard, but would you ever consider paying one to go to the gym?  That's exactly what researchers at Harold Hamm Diabetes Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center are doing, but for reasons you might not expect.

The research, funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Health, focuses on how to motivate young people to make lifestyle changes that can help them avoid health problems, including overweight, obesity and diabetes.

It's called the MOVE study, a research project that, as the name suggests, aims to motivate teens to get moving more.

"We've developed new protocols for treating diabetes in children, but nothing in terms of teaching those at risk to avoid the disease," said Kenneth Copeland, M.D., co-principal investigator of the study. Copeland holds the Paul and Ann Milburn Chair in Pediatric Diabetes at the OU College of Medicine and director of pediatric programs at Harold Hamm Diabetes Center.

"Studies have demonstrated that incentive programs help adults meet their goals in weight loss or smoking cessation programs, but no one has ever considered whether financial incentives can improve health outcomes in younger populations," said Kevin Short, Ph.D., co-principal investigator and associate professor in pediatric diabetes and endocrinology at the OU College of Medicine.

It is now estimated that one in three children born today will develop diabetes during his or her lifetime. The rising prevalence of diabetes and obesity in younger populations has been especially alarming and has researchers and health care providers evaluating new strategies for preventing children from developing diabetes in the first place.  

The MOVE study will evaluate how effective financial incentives are in motivating young people to exercise regularly.

Copeland and Short have collaborated with the Choctaw Nation, developing initial sites for the program in Hugo and Talihina.

The year-long study enrolls participants in three sessions, each 16 weeks long.  In the first session, participants are rewarded for the number of visits made to a designated workout facility.  In the second session, study enrollees are rewarded for the amount of time they spend in a predetermined heart rate range.  The final session randomly rewards participants of the study.

"Many of these kids don't understand that exercise is the best approach for diabetes prevention and that physical activity is important for overall health," said Short.  "Using money as an immediate incentive helps us demonstrate to the kids that consistently and routinely exercising makes you feel better and improves a lot more than your waist size."

MOVE isn't just about the money, however.  The research program is designed to encourage positive clinical outcomes by improving physical fitness, lowering blood pressure and helping teenagers learn habits that lead to good health. 

"We hope this research will help us develop prevention programs that effectively address how to increase the physical activity levels of all youth as well as model incentive programs for future use in the Choctaw Nation and elsewhere," said Short. 

The MOVE study is part of a larger NIH-funded diabetes prevention research effort led by Neil Henderson, Ph.D., director of the American Indian Diabetes Prevention Center at the OU College of Public Health.  
 

Harold Hamm Diabetes Center is an OU Medicine Center of Excellence leading the way to prevent, treat, and ultimately find a cure for diabetes.
Research reported in this news release was supported by the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number P20MD000528. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1780Thu, 18 Dec 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Anesthesiologist Joins OU PhysiciansTanmay Shah, M.D., a board-certified anesthesiologist, has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. He has also been named an assistant professor of anesthesiology for the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. Anesthesiologists specialize in the use of drugs and other means to avert or reduce pain in patients, especially during surgery. 
      
Shah completed an anesthesiology residency at Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, N.J., after completing a fellowship in obstetric anesthesiology at the University of Pittsburgh, Penn. He completed a pediatric anesthesiology fellowship at Women's & Children's Hospital of Buffalo, N.Y. He earned his medical degree in India.
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1779Tue, 16 Dec 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Adolescent Medicine Provider Joins PracticeKelly Curran, M.D., has established her medical practice with OU Children's Physicians and will see patients in the adolescent medicine clinic. Adolescent medicine physicians provide comprehensive general health care to teenagers, including routine wellness checks, sports physicals and immunizations.
      
Curran has also been named an assistant professor with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. She is board certified in both internal medicine and pediatrics and board eligible in adolescent medicine. 
      
Curran completed an adolescent medicine fellowship at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, where she also completed an internal medicine/pediatrics residency. She earned her medical degree from Loyola Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, Ill.
      
Curran is a member of the Society of Adolescent Medicine and Health.
      
OU Children's Physicians Adolescent Medicine providers see patients at 1200 Children's Ave., in Oklahoma City. For appointments, call (405) 271-6208.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1778Tue, 16 Dec 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Radiologist Joins OU Physicians Joseph Lambert, II, M.D., a board-certified radiologist, has established his medical practice at OU Physicians. Radiologists specialize in administering, supervising and interpreting MRI, CT, X-ray, ultrasound and other types of imaging studies. 
      
Lambert completed a musculoskeletal imaging fellowship at Duke University Hospital, Durham, N.C. He completed a diagnostic radiology residency at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and an emergency medicine residency at Pitt County Memorial Hospital, Greenville, N.C. He completed  medical school at Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University, Huntington, W.Va.          
      
Lambert is a member of Radiologic Society of North America, American Roentgen Ray Society and the American College of Radiology.
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1777Tue, 16 Dec 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Quality in Focus: Improved Health Care Impacts Health Equity Improving overall quality of care for hospitalized patients produces a welcome by-product --improvements in the equity of care for racial and ethnic minorities.

That's the conclusion of a new report by researchers, including Dale Bratzler, D.O., M.P.H., professor and associate dean of the University of Oklahoma College of Public Health. The study appears in the current issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

"Certain racial and ethnic minorities historically have not received the same quality of care as Caucasian patients," said Bratzler. "Our research shows that improving health care overall closed the gap."

The findings are based upon a survey of over 12 million patients at about 4,000 American hospitals in the United States.  It began almost a decade ago when the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services began an ambitious public reporting initiative. 
 
"Beginning about 2005, all hospitals in the country essentially had to start reporting quality of care metrics for heart attack, pneumonia and heart failure," Bratzler said. "Then in 2012, Medicare payments to hospitals became contingent upon how well those hospitals implemented federal metrics for quality of care. As a result, overall quality of care at hospitals in the U.S. was found to have significantly improved."
 
Yet, did the gap in care for minorities remain? That is the question Bratzler and fellow researchers tackled in their work.
 
"We wanted to see if improved overall quality of care on these common conditions – heart attack, pneumonia, or heart failure – would decrease racial disparities as well as to determine whether disparities in care were improved not just within hospitals but also between hospitals."
At the start of the survey in 2005, researchers found nine measures for which minority patients (three for black and six for Hispanic patients) received substantially lower quality of care than white patients. Six years later, these racial and ethnic gaps in quality of care for all of these measures had narrowed.
 
In some cases the disparities narrowed significantly. In others, they were entirely eliminated as overall quality of care improved for white, black and Hispanic patients," Bratzler said.
 
In addition, the study found the disparities not only declined for white and minority patients treated in the same hospital, they also declined in hospitals that serve larger proportions of minority patients.   
 
"The study shows that quality improvement interventions are relatively blind to color or ethnicity. That’s likely because efforts to improve quality of care often attempt to make care more consistent and less variable and may thereby also reduce inappropriate variations based on race or ethnicity," Bratzler said.

Researchers said the study supports ongoing tracking of quality of care for minority and non-minority patients in an effort to continue to detect whether quality improvement efforts further enhance equity of care. 
 
The study was funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The research team included members from the Oklahoma Foundation for Medical Quality, OU Health Sciences Center, Brown University, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Providence VA Medical Center and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. 
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1773Thu, 11 Dec 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Orthopedic Surgeon Joins OU Physicians Rishi Thakral, M.D., a fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeon, has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. He has also been named an assistant professor with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. 
      
Thakral specializes in limb salvage and reconstruction, total joint replacement (hip and knee), revision total joint surgery, hip preservation surgery, lower extremity deformity correction and lengthening.
      
Thakral completed fellowships in adult reconstructive surgery at the University of Chicago and then at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. He also completed a fellowship in limb reconstruction and lengthening at Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Md. Thakral completed orthopedics and surgery residencies in Ireland. 
      
He is a member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and AOTrauma, an international community of trauma and orthopedic surgeons and others dedicated to improving patient care and outcomes in the field of musculoskeletal trauma.
      
Thakral sees patients at the OU Physicians building, 825 N.E 10th Street, Oklahoma City. For an appointment with an OU Physicians orthopedic hand surgeon, call (405) 271-2663.
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1772Thu, 11 Dec 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Poundwise Holiday Potluck and Parties Guide'Tis the season … the season for parties.  With invitations to office parties, neighborhood parties, church parties and more from now right through New Year's Eve, how do you participate without packing on the pounds? Health experts say it just takes a little planning.
 
With so many holiday parties, buffets and potlucks, and so many delicious options readily available, it's easy to overindulge. Health experts say that's where a little pre-party planning can help.
 
A great trick is to make sure you don't show up hungry, said Molly Fernando, Psy.D., with Harold Hamm Diabetes Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. If you arrive famished, you will be more likely to overindulge. So she suggests eating a healthy snack before you go. 
 
When you arrive, evaluate your options before you start filling your plate.
 
"Just walk around the buffet table. See what choices you have. Then when you actually get in line to get your food, you already know what you are going to choose. So that can be a very easy trick," Fernando said.
 
Here are a few other pound-wise holiday potluck and party tips from the health experts at Harold Hamm Diabetes Center:
 
•         Choose a smaller plate. This allows you to load up with smaller portions of your favorite foods and still have a full plate.
•         Eat slowly and savor the food while enjoying the company of friends and family.
•         Don't stand next to the food. Distance is your friend when it comes to buffets.
•         If you are thinking about going back for seconds, wait 10 minutes. It takes a while for your brain to register that you are full. So if you wait before going back for more, you may realize that you are already full.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1770Thu, 11 Dec 2014 00:00:00 GMT
OU Nurses Sweep ONA Awards 2014Faculty at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center College of Nursing won all four individual awards presented by the Oklahoma Nurses Association at its annual conference. As the leading professional organization for nurses in the state, the Oklahoma Nurses Association recognizes and advocates for excellence in the nursing profession. The faculty were recognized for achievements in research, excellence in nursing, impact on public policy and a career of exemplary achievement.  

Lazelle Benefield, dean of the College of Nursing, was honored with the Nursing Research Award for producing excellent research in geriatric nursing, focusing on aging in place and the ways that nurses and caretakers, especially those looking after a family member with dementia, could use technology to assist in their caregiving. The award recognized that not only was the research itself innovative, but it created clear ways for nurses to implement the findings and improve outcomes for patients and caregivers. The models Benefield created can be used to fill in gaps in care and provide guidelines for nurses and family caregivers, who provide more than half of the care for people with dementia. It also demonstrated how nurses at a distance can stay in touch with caregivers and patients to ensure that needs are met.  

Gary Loving, the college's associate dean for Academic Programs, received the Excellence in Nursing Award recognized his pioneering use of technology and distance education, representing a unique and creative approach that uses nursing theory in a practice setting. Loving began using technology to connect classrooms across the state as early as 1992—far before the current wave of online and synchronous courses. The next 25 years have seen further adoption of technology-mediated instruction put in place at the College under his direction. At present, the College of Nursing is a leader in both exceptional instruction and innovative ways to deliver it. He has provided leadership in teaching informatics, innovative online instruction and in the use of clinical simulations, including inter-professional simulation lab opportunities that allow student nurses to work alongside other healthcare students to gain experience as close to the real-world as possible.
 
Janet Sullivan Wilson received the award for Nursing Impact on Public Policy following the signing of State House Bill 2526 into law in May 2014 by Governor Fallin. Dr. Wilson's research in the late 1990s recognized intimate partner violence as both a public health and criminal problem that caused preventable injuries and deaths in Oklahoma. This work resulted in the formation of a statewide fatality review board that today reviews all intimate partner fatalities, collects and analyzes data, and recommends best practices for a wide variety of professionals in health care, law enforcement, and social services to better identify and intervene in domestic violence. Case analyses from this fatality review board discovered that professionals responding to intimate partner violence needed evidence-based tools to be effective. 

Wilson's most recent research, funded by the National Institute of Justice, evaluated police use of a lethality screen and safety protocol when called to homes for intimate partner violence, thus shifting the emphasis to violence prevention. Because of this study's findings and her collaboration with Oklahoma's violence prevention agencies, HB 2526 includes the intervention evaluated in her research. Oklahoma is the first state in the country to legislate police use of the lethality assessment protocol intervention, specifying that victims have the right to know the signs of lethality and be given state resources to keep them safe. Wilson is on the Oklahoma Attorney General's newly formed Lethality Assessment Council to help with the coordination and implementation of this law. 

Professor Emma Kientz, coordinator for the College of Nursing at the OU-Tulsa Schusterman Center, was honored with the Nightingale Award of Excellence, recognizing a career of exceptional achievements in nursing. Kientz is noted for serving as a role model of consistent excellence and a leader in her field. In addition to teaching students in the classroom for the past 12 years in online and clinical areas, she is responsible for managing the college's daily operations in Tulsa. Her impact reaches into the community, where she serves on the executive management team of the Tulsa Healthy Start Initiative and as a member of the Tulsa Family Health Coalition. In the areas of preventative health care, she serves as a program reviewer for the Association of Prevention Teaching and Research and is an active member of the Oklahoma Health Aging Initiative Northeast Region. In addition, she is pursuing a Doctorate in Nurse Practice.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1771Wed, 10 Dec 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Orthopedic Surgeon Joins OU Children's PhysiciansDavid Y. Chong, M.D., a pediatric orthopedic surgeon, has established his medical practice with OU Children's Physicians. He has also been named an assistant professor of pediatric orthopedic surgery at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.
      
Chong has a specific interest in diagnosing and treating children with congenital deficiencies, often performing limb reconstruction, hip preservation and spine surgery. 
      
Chong completed a fellowship in limb deformity and reconstruction surgery at the Paley Advanced Limb Lengthening Institute, West Palm Beach, Fla. He completed a fellowship in pediatric orthopedic surgery at the University of Utah/Shriner's Hospital for Children, Salt Lake City. He completed his orthopedic surgery residency at the University of Alabama-Birmingham Medical Center and earned his medical degree with honors in orthopedic surgery and primary care at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville.
      
Chong sees patients in the OU Children's Physicians building, 1200 Children's Avenue, Oklahoma City. For appointments with OU Children's Physicians orthopedic surgeons, call (405) 271-2669.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1769Tue, 09 Dec 2014 00:00:00 GMT
OU Research Earns Cover of Prestigious Cancer PublicationUniversity of Oklahoma research pointing to a possible and promising new treatment for one of the deadliest cancers is prominently showcased in the newest edition of a top cancer research publication.  

The research by Altaf Mohammed, Ph.D., and C.V. Rao, Ph.D., of the Stephenson Cancer Center is featured on the cover of the December issue of Cancer Prevention Research--the flagship journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

"It is really a great honor for me to have our work featured on the cover of this prestigious publication," said Mohammed, who also is a faculty member of the OU College of Medicine's Department of Internal Medicine.

Rates of pancreatic cancer have increased slightly over the past decade. According to the American Cancer Society, about 46,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer each year and more than 39,000 die. It is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths among American men and women. OU researchers say finding an effective treatment and ultimately a cure is critical.

"Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers," Rao said. "It is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths among American men and women; and according to one estimate, it could become the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths by the year 2020."

Rao, Mohammed and their research team at the Stephenson Cancer Center are focused on the impact of a specific drug on pancreatic cancer. The drug already is FDA-approved as a topical treatment for excessive facial hair growth in women and as an injectable treatment for sleeping sickness. However, it has also shown promise in about 20 clinical trials (ongoing/completed) in treating several cancers, including skin and colon cancer. 

The OU team is evaluating the drug's effectiveness against pancreatic cancer in laboratory studies. Their work shows the drug effectively inhibits the growth of pancreatic carcinoma. While more study is needed, the researchers say the laboratory research may point the way toward clinical trials of the drug in patients with pancreatic cancer soon. 

"We believe our work may help move such clinical trials onto the fast track  ̶  perhaps as early as next year, " Rao said. 

Increasing the chance for rapidly moving forward with clinical trials is the fact that the drug has shown no toxicological or human safety concerns in previous clinical trials for other cancers. 

"I am thrilled that other cancer researchers will read of our work," Mohammed said of the publication about their work in Cancer Prevention Research. "This is an important drug, which has been studied for a long time in other cancers, but not for the pancreatic cancer."

The research is supported by funding from the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health (NCI grant N01-CN-53300).

##

About the Stephenson Cancer Center 
Oklahoma's only comprehensive academic cancer center, the Stephenson Cancer Center is a nationally recognized leader in research and patient care. The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top five cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead centers nationally in the NCI's National Clinical Trials Network. In collaboration with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is decreasing the burden of cancer in Oklahoma by supporting innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research. The Stephenson Cancer Center has 180 research members who are conducting over 100 cancer research projects at institutions across Oklahoma. This research is supported by $28.7 million in annual funding from the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society and other sponsors.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1768Fri, 05 Dec 2014 00:00:00 GMT
The Holidays: Your "No Diet" ZoneThe holiday season is no time for dieting. That's the word from experts at Harold Hamm Diabetes Center at the University of Oklahoma, but that doesn't mean you can't still focus on your health.

"This is the holiday season, you don't want to put yourself on a strict diet or any diet for that matter," said Molly Fernando, Psy.D., a clinical psychologist with the Diabetes Center. 

The fact is "diet" is a four-letter word as far as most health and nutrition experts are concerned. That's because most people associate the word with restrictive eating plans that may even focus on fads that are not healthy and often not designed to produce long-term positive results for your health. 

Yes, the holiday season can be filled with delicious and tempting foods, but Fernando said the key to managing your waistline and your health, even if you are living with diabetes, is to shift your thinking.

"You can make the healthy choices; but you can also indulge a little and have a piece of that holiday cake that you enjoy. You just have to be mindful of what you are putting into your body and remember everything in moderation," she said.

Fernando knows that small changes in the way we think can have a big impact on what we choose to eat or drink and in our activity levels too. They have seen the strategy work for the many Oklahomans who have taken advantage of the Diabetes Center's Small Steps, Big Changes program. It's a program that empowers participants to live healthier through small, easy-to-make changes in both diet and exercise. It helps participants learn how to live fully while making better choices for their health, even during the holidays.

"During the holidays, we may feel like we are inevitably going to overspend, overeat and overtire ourselves, but we don't necessarily have to," Fernando said. "Just remember that you can control what goes into your body, the decisions that you make and the responsibilities that you take on. All it takes is a little planning ahead to maintain your health and still enjoy the holiday season."

Health experts at Harold Hamm Diabetes Center recommend the following 10 tips to focus on improved health this holiday season:
 
1.            Keep Your Doctor's Appointments
The holiday season can be extremely busy with things to do, meals to prepare, shopping and more. Sometimes, regular doctor's visits take a back seat to other things. In order to maintain your health, especially if you are living with a chronic disease like diabetes, it is vital to make keeping those doctor's appointments a priority.
2.            Don't Forget Your Medications
When you get busy, it's easy to get off schedule when it comes to medications, but that can put your health at risk. So remember to take all medications as instructed. If you have diabetes, be sure to test your blood sugar regularly and to adjust your medications accordingly.
3.            Snacking Helps
Eat a healthy snack before attending a holiday function. This can curb your appetite and help you make healthier choices and to avoid overindulging. 
4.            Potluck Those Parties
Oftentimes, everyone brings something to holiday parties and gatherings. So bring something you like, but that is also lower in sugar, calories and fat. This ensures that you will have at least one healthy choice.
5.            Super Small-Size the Plate
Choosing a smaller plate helps trick your mind. That way you fill your plate full with smaller portions of your favorite foods. 
6.            Watch What You Drink 
Many holiday drinks pack a hefty helping of sugar and calories. So choose water or other low and calorie-free beverages like club soda, diet beverages or tea. Alcoholic beverages should be kept to a minimum as they can sabotage both glucose control and healthy decisions.   
7.            Make Physical Activity Fun
Even shopping can help you get up and get moving. Park farther out and take a few extra laps around the mall to "window shop." When families gather, take a walk with a favorite relative to talk and catch up or gather the entire family for a game of football or soccer after the meal. 
8.            Get Your ZZZs
When you are tried, you may be tempted to grab for food to help bolster your energy. Adequate sleep also helps reduce stress.
9.            Just Say NO!
Plan ahead for what you can and can't do during the holidays. We can't do it all. So learn to set boundaries and to politely say "no" when a request exceeds them. 
10.        Manage your stress!
See tips 7, 8 and 9. Regular physical activity, adequate sleep and setting appropriate boundaries will help you reduce your stress and enjoy the holidays more!        
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1764Wed, 26 Nov 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Helping Those with Alzheimer's Remain Independent LongerA new grant will help advance research at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center aimed at helping individuals with Alzheimer's retain their independence longer.
 
Alzheimer's affects 60,000 Oklahomans, a number that is projected to grow by more than 25 percent in the next decade. 
 
Now, the Alzheimer's Association has awarded almost $100,000 to the OU College of Allied Health. The grant funds a new phase of research into a method known as Skill-building through Task-Oriented Motor Practice or STOMP, a non-drug therapy that showed promise in earlier research in preserving cognitive function in people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. It is one of only three non-medication studies awarded grants by the Alzheimer's Association this year. 
 
"Based on our previous STOMP clinical and at-home studies, we know that this method of therapy helps patients with dementia or Alzheimer's retain their ability to perform daily life skills," said Carrie Ciro, Ph.D., principal investigator and assistant professor of occupational therapy at the OU College of Allied Health.
 
Developed by researchers at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, STOMP utilizes repetitive therapy in an effort to strengthen and preserve procedural memory, the memory that allows individuals to accomplish tasks of daily living.  
 
"Our brain is hard-wired to improve in activities that we practice. While conscious memory for facts and personal information is impaired in dementia, procedural memory -- unconscious memory for activity performance -- is retained later in the disease," Ciro said.
 
The STOMP method allows researchers to identify tasks most important to each individual with Alzheimer's and then practice those tasks on a regular basis. Such activities might include bill paying, operating the microwave, taking medications properly or operating a computer to access Email.
 
In previous studies, Ciro said participants practiced such activities for three hours every day, five days a week for two weeks both in a clinical laboratory, designed to be similar to the home environment, and also in their own homes. 
 
"Now, we want to determine the minimum amount of therapy needed to help these patients sustain those skills and lower their risk of institutionalization," she said.
 
In the newest study, all sessions will be in the participants' homes. Half will participate in the skill-building activities three hours a day, five days a week for two weeks as in the original studies. The other half will do skill-building activities one hour two days a week for two weeks.   
 
"The goal is to determine whether the amount of therapy makes a difference in the retention of procedural memory," Ciro said.  
 
"For Oklahomans with Alzheimer's and their more than 200,000 caregivers, I believe this research at OU will drastically help in their daily lives," said Nellie Windsor, communications director, Oklahoma Chapter of the Alzheimer's Association. 
 
Recruitment for the newest STOMP clinical trial is already underway. To qualify for the study, individuals must:
-          Be between the ages of 55 and 80
-          Have mild to moderate dementia
-          And live at home with a spouse or caregiver
 
Participation in the study is limited. To learn more about the study, call (405) 271-2131.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1760Fri, 21 Nov 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Student UCARD | Win Prizes! | Various Campus Events

The Student UCARDS are a fun and interactive way for students to experience all that this campus has to offer along with gaining chances to win FREE STUFF! Come to events sponsored by HSC Student Affairs, Suite 300, to receive your card or punches on your card. 5 punches=FREE T-Shirt, 10 punches=Entered to win an IPad Mini. Come and enjoy your time here at HSC!!!

Student UCARD Eligible Events:

·         #HSCWOW

·         Sweets in the Suite

·         Leadership Lunches

·         Social Hours

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1665
Pathologist Joins OU Physicians
Pathologist Rachel Conrad, M.D., has established her practice with OU Physicians. She is also a assistant professor of pathology with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. 
      
Conrad is board certified in pathology and cytopathology (the branch of pathology that studies and diagnoses diseases on the cellular level). She completed a cytopathology fellowship at the University of California, Los Angeles. She completed her residency in anatomic/clinical pathology at Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, California, where she also earned her medical degree. 
      
Conrad is a member of the American Society of Clinical Pathology, the College of American Pathologists, U.S. and Canadian Academy of Pathology and the American Society of Cytopathology.
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1747Tue, 04 Nov 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Keep HSC GreenHelp the Health Sciences Center live Green!

 
Members of the campus community are encouraged to recycle the below items at the David L. Boren Student Union:
  • Plastic
  • Newspaper
  • White paper
  • Aluminum

Please be mindful of the helpful hints from the HSC Green Team.
 
Computers
 
  • Screen savers DO NOT save energy. Instead put your computer into “sleep mode” by enabling power saving features. When not actively in use, your monitor and hard drive will go into a low power mode.
  • Turn OFF your monitor when going to lunch, taking a study break or attending a meeting.
  • If your computer must be left on, turn off the monitor.
  • Use the “print preview” option to find potential errors before printing, because saving paper saves energy.

General Office Equipment
 
  • Enable power-saving features on all equipment.
  • Use power strips, but turn equipment on and off individually.
  • Buy office equipment with the “Energy Star” label. Energy Star products meet or exceed the Environmental Protection Agency’s energy efficiency criteria.
  • Schedule energy-intensive activities in the morning hours to avoid peak electrical rates, such as running large numbers of copies or prints, experiments, etc.

Your Environment
 
  • Keep window shades and blinds closed when the sun is directly on the windows.
  • Limit the use electric space or radiant heaters; they are a fire hazard and consume enormous amounts of energy.
  • When gone for extended periods of time, unplug personal refrigerators and/or microwaves.
  • There are certain electronic devices that continue to use power even though they are not turned on, lovingly called "Phantoms". To help save electricity in your home or office remember to unplug your phone, laptop, camera, iPod, and/or power tool charger.
 
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=534Tue, 01 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Nephrologist Joins OU PhysiciansUsman Z. Bhutta, M.D., has established his practice at OU Physicians. Nephrologists specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders affecting the kidneys. 
      
Bhutta is board certified in internal medicine and board eligible in nephrology. He completed a nephrology fellowship at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where he also completed an internal medicine residency. He earned his medical degree in Pakistan.
      
Bhutta is a member of the American Society of Nephrology.
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1741Fri, 31 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Hand Surgeon Joins OU Physicians Yuri Lansinger, M.D., a fellowship-trained hand surgeon, has established her medical practice with OU Physicians.
      
Lansinger sees adult and pediatric patients with hand and upper extremity injuries and conditions. She also sees patients with general orthopedic conditions. 
      
She completed a hand surgery fellowship through the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. She completed an orthopedic surgery residency at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. She earned her medical degree from Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, D.C., where she also earned a master's degree in physiology. She earned an additional master's degree in Biblical studies from Westminster Seminary California, Escondido.
      
Lansinger is a member of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand, International Congress for Joint Reconstruction and American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.     
      
Lansinger sees patients at the OU Physicians building, 825 N.E 10th Street, Oklahoma City. For an appointment with an OU Physicians orthopedic hand surgeon, call (405) 271-2663.
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1740Fri, 31 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Setting Errant Heart Rhythms RightResearchers at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center are exploring the effectiveness of a new high-tech treatment for atrial fibrillation, a common heart rhythm disorder.

Atrial fibrillation affects more than 2.5 million Americans. With atrial fibrillation, rapid, disorganized electrical signals cause the heart’s two upper chambers to beat very fast and irregularly.  Atrial fibrillation can cause strokes and death.

Current treatments involve drugs or surgery, but a new approach is being investigated that focuses on stimulating the vagus nerve, a nerve that exists on both sides of the body and plays an important role in helping the heart beat within a safe range.
  
"It's been shown that people who have a greater vagal tone are less likely to suffer a heart attack, are less likely to have sudden cardiac death or an adverse outcome following a heart attack,” said Stavros Stavrakis, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor in the department of Cardiology at the OU College of Medicine and member of the OU Heart Rhythm Institute.

Stavrakis and his team are evaluating the therapeutic potential of low-level vagus nerve stimulation in the treatment of atrial fibrillation.

The approach utilizes a stimulator surgically implanted around the vagus nerve.
   
"So you just do a small incision in the neck; put that in; and then the stimulator communicates wirelessly with an external generator,” Stavrakis said.

The hope is that by stimulating the vagus nerve at a level that is not slowing the heart rate and is not noticeable by the patient, the device will be able to prevent episodes of atrial fibrillation, thereby regulating and restoring a more normal heart rhythm.

If successful in the laboratory, the developers of the device believe clinical trials could begin in the United States as early as next year. The company already is in the process of testing a prototype in patients in Europe.

While commercial availability of the device in this country is still probably five to ten years away, Stavrakis said it is promising technology and may provide a way to offer a minimally invasive treatment for atrial fibrillation. However, he emphasizedthe technology would likely be used to complement, rather than replace, current atrial fibrillation treatments.

The research is being conducted in conjunction with Rosellini Scientific with funding from a $75,000 NIH Small Business Innovation Research grant.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1738Wed, 29 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Accidental Injury Can be the Real Scare on HalloweenHalloween brings costumes, gatherings and trick-or-treating, but it can also pose hidden dangers for children.

"Every year about 42 million get involved with trick or treating for Halloween and they go to about 110 billion houses across the United States," said Kirk Verbrugghe, an emergency room physician at Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. "In all of the excitement, accidents sometimes happen. That's why it's important to take steps ahead of time to help protect your children from accidental injury."

Verbrugghe and fellow E-R physicians at Children's say pedestrian versus vehicle accidents result in some of the most serious injuries they see. 

"Everyone just needs to slow down and pay extra attention on Halloween night," Verbrugghe said. "You've had a long day at work and you are coming home. It's right around the time that all the little ones are going to be trick or treating. So you just really, really need to slow down throughout your neighborhood. Make sure there are no distractions.  Turn your radio off. Turn your cell phone off. Don't text and just keep a close eye out for the kids."

Here are other tips to help keep your Halloween festivities safe: 

Make sure costumes are not too long and are made of flame-resistant materials
Face paint or makeup is preferable to masks, but if wearing a mask enlarge the eye holes to allow full vision.
Make sure costumes are not too long, which can cause trips and falls
Make sure your child carries a flashlight and consider adding reflective tape to costumes for better visibility. 
Don't wear costume contact lenses as they can cause injury or infection to your eyes.
Don't allow children under the age of 12 trick-or-treat without adult supervision.
If children over 12 are going out alone, make sure you know where they are going, what route they will take and have them check in regularly.
Instruct your children to only visit houses that are well lit and to NEVER enter a house.
Stay on the sidewalk and don't cut across lawns, which may have hidden tripping dangers.
Remind your children not to eat their treats until you have had a chance to check them over at home.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1735Wed, 29 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Radiologist Joins OU Physicians Divya Gunda, M.D., a neuroradiologist, has established her medical practice at OU Physicians. Neuroradiology is a subspecialty of radiology focusing on the diagnosis and characterization of abnormalities of the central and peripheral nervous system.
      
Gunda is board certified in radiology. She provides neuroradiology services for both adult and pediatric patients. She completed a neuroradiology fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, and completed her diagnostic radiology residency at Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadephia. She earned her medical degree at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.
      
Gunda is a member of the American Society of Neuroradiology, American College of Radiology and Radiological Society of North America.
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1734Wed, 29 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Audiologist Joins OU Physicians Audiologist Ariel Adams Bennett, Au.D., has established her practice with OU Physicians. She will sees pediatric and adult patients.
      
Bennett earned her certificate of clinical competence from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. She earned her doctorate in audiology from Gallaudet University, Washington, D.C. She is a member of the Hearing Loss Association of America.
      
Bennett sees patients at OU Children's Physicians, 1200 Children's Ave., and OU Physicians, 825 N.E. 10th St., Oklahoma City. For appointments, call 405-271-7559. 
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1733Tue, 28 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Urologic Cancer Specialist Joins Cancer CenterKelly Stratton, M.D., a urologic oncologist, has established his medical practice with the Stephenson Cancer Center. Urology is the surgical specialty dealing with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and disorders of the urinary tract and reproductive organs. 
      
As a urologic oncologist, Stratton will diagnose and treat urologic cancers primarily through minimally invasive and robotic surgeries.  
      
Stratton completed a urologic oncology fellowship and served as chief fellow at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, N.Y. He completed a urology residency at Vanderbilt University, Nashville. He earned his medical degree from the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and earned his undergraduate degree at OU in Norman. 
      
Stratton is a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Society of Urologic Oncology and American Urologic Association.
      
Stratton sees patients at the Stephenson Cancer Center, 800 N.E. 10th Street. For an appointment, call (405) 271-4088. 
        
Oklahoma's only comprehensive academic cancer center, the Stephenson Cancer Center is a nationally recognized leader in research and patient care. The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top five cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead centers nationally in the Institute's National Clinical Trials Network. In collaboration with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is decreasing the burden of cancer in Oklahoma by supporting innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research. The Stephenson Cancer Center has 180 research members who are conducting over 100 cancer research projects at institutions across Oklahoma. This research is supported by $28.7 million in annual funding from the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society and other sponsors.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1724Mon, 20 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Pediatric Nephrologist Joins OU Children's PhysiciansAnjali Nayak, M.D., a pediatric nephrologist, has established her medical practice with OU Children's Physicians. Nephrologists specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders affecting the kidneys. 
      
Nayak works with pediatric patients needing kidney transplantation. She is board certified in pediatrics and board eligible in pediatric nephrology. She completed a fellowship at Mattel Children's Hospital, University of California-Los Angeles, and a residency at Hershey Medical Center/Penn State University, Hershey, Pa. She earned her medical degree in India. 
      
Nayak is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics, American Society of Nephrology and American Society of Pediatric Nephrology.
      
For an appointment with any of the OU Children's Physicians pediatric nephrologists, call (405) 271-4211.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1723Mon, 20 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT
A Killer Among Us
Ebola has been in the news a lot lately, and surveys show it is stirring concern for people all across the United States. The actual risk of developing Ebola is low here, though, while the risks associated with another deadly disease, blood clots, are significant. Yet, few are aware of them.

Millions of people die every year from blood clots. They are the underlying cause of the world's top three cardiovascular killers: heart attack, stroke and venous thromboembolism (blood clots in the legs and lungs).

Now, the dean of the University of Oklahoma College of Public Health and other experts worldwide have joined in a new international initiative to raise awareness about blood clots and ultimately save lives. 

Monday, Oct.13, marked the first World Thrombosis Day. The primary focus of this year's initiative is venous thromboembolism, which impacts hundreds of thousands of Americans every year.

"There are too many people unaware of the facts about blood clots in the leg and lungs and their life-threatening consequences – and too many people are dying a preventable death," said Gary Raskob, Ph.D., dean of the OU College of Public Health and internationally known for his research into the prevention and treatment of blood clots. "The worldwide effort for World Thrombosis Day is designed to increase awareness among the public and among health care professionals about the importance of thrombosis as a major contributor to death and disability worldwide."
 
Judy Belk of Mustang learned firsthand just how dangerous those clots can be. The Mustang woman loves to garden, loves her family and loves to travel too. It was after returning from a trip to the mountains with her husband, though, that something went terribly wrong. 

"I was standing at the kitchen sink and I noticed I was having trouble breathing and I thought, well it will pass, you know. And I went ahead and finished cleaning up. And by the time I walked into the living room, I said ‘Glen, I'm having trouble breathing. And of course, being in the medical field, he said, ‘All right, let's go.' And so he got up, and we made a flying trip to the hospital," Belk said.
 
At the hospital, doctors quickly diagnosed Belk with pulmonary embolism. She actually had two clots, one in each lung. Belk was immediately hospitalized and treatment begun.
 
"If we can implement treatment quickly, which mostly consists of anti-clotting medication, the prognosis for patients is excellent. The key is getting a prompt, accurate diagnosis," Raskob said.

Blood clots can strike at any age. Vascular medicine experts say one of the challenges in preventing blood clots is how few people know about factors that may put them at risk.

"The most common risk factors actually have to do with being in the hospital or immediately following being in the hospital whether that be for a medical illness like pneumonia or heart failure or surgery, especially orthopedic surgery. People who have been in serious accidents are also at increased risk," said Dr. Suman Rathbun of the OU Vascular Center.

Other risk factors include:

-          Not moving for long periods of time
For example, having to stay on bed rest or traveling on long trips without getting up and walking around are examples of being immobile that can increase your risk.
-          Older age
The older we get the greater our risk for developing a blood clot.
-          Family history 
If someone in your family has had a blood clot, you may be at increased risk, especially if you add one of the three risk factors we just discussed like undergoing surgery or being in the hospital.
-          Using estrogen medications like oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy
-          Being pregnant or having recently given birth.
 
Since two-thirds of blood clots occur during or following hospitalization or surgery, health care providers and hospitals have grown increasingly aware of the importance of taking steps to prevent clots. 
 
"Many hospitals, including ours, do a risk assessment with every admission. The goal is to assess the patient's risk of getting clots, then prescribe either mechanical means to prevent clots, like pumps and support hose or medicine that can prevent clots," Rathbun said.
 
At OU Medical Center, clot prevention begins as soon as a physician enters his or her patient into the electronic hospital system.
 
"The first screen that comes up says your name, maybe the patient's name, and then what you are being admitted for. So, you are being admitted for pneumonia. You are being admitted for cancer surgery," said Dr. Curt Steinhart, medical director at OU Medical Systems. "Then it will say who the doctor is that you are being admitted to. Then right after that, it says VTE prophylaxis. VTE is short for venous thromboembolism, or blood clot. You can't order the diet. You can't order the lab work. You can't order the medications. You can't order anything.  You can't close your orders out without making a decision about whether you are going to use prophylaxis against deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism."
 
Raskob said the World Thrombosis Day effort is about empowering individuals to take steps to protect themselves too.

"It is critical for people to: one, know the risk factors; two, be proactive – talk to your doctor about your risk and ask about preventing blood clots, especially if you are admitted to a hospital or are having surgery; and three, know the symptoms and signs of a deep-vein thrombosis and of a pulmonary embolism and seek medical attention promptly if you experience them," he said.

Information on warning signs, risk factors, prevention and ways the public can get involved are available at www.worldthrombosisday.org 
 
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1718Sat, 11 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Targeting Breast Cancer Tumors with LightResearchers at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center hope to shed new light on breast cancer treatment with fewer side effects.

They have developed an innovative treatment strategy that utilizes photodynamic therapy and site-specific chemotherapy to precisely target breast cancer tumors in an effort to maximize the therapeutic efficacy and to minimize the body's exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs.

Youngjae You, Ph.D., a member of the Stephenson Cancer Center and associate professor with the OU College of Pharmacy, has just received a new three-year, $550,000 federal grant to advance the work.

His laboratory-based research targets a specific type of breast cancer known as triple-negative. That means the tumor does not have any of the three most common known cancer-growth factors – estrogen, progesterone or the HER-2 gene. Thus, hormonal and HER-2 targeted therapies do not work for such cancers.

"Chemotherapy, the treatment of cancer with chemical drugs, is the one of the ways to treat triple negative breast cancer," You said. "Unfortunately, even when their breast tumors are localized, patients experience side effects from chemotherapy, like weakness, nausea, vomiting and pain, because their entire body is exposed to the drug."

Not only can these side effects be difficult for patients, they may also limit the amount of a chemotherapy drug that can be given.

"By being able to combine chemotherapy with photodynamic therapy using our novel linker technique, we have found that we are able to have a site-specific and controlled delivery of the drugs to the tumor without all the negative side effects caused by systemic chemotherapy," he said. 

Photodynamic therapy is a treatment that uses special drugs, called photosensitizing agents that only work after they have been activated by near infrared light. 

You and his team first deliver inactive chemotherapy drugs directly to a tumor. Next, near infrared light is introduced to the tumor site by way of a fiber optic cable. The light breaks the chemical bonds that keep the drugs from working. With those bonds broken, the drugs become active and kill cancer cells at the tumor site.

"What makes this approach so unique is that we discovered a groundbreaking way to break these bonds with near infrared light using a special chemical bond we developed," You said. "It allows us to keep the drugs outside the tumor inactive and release the active chemotherapy drug at the tumor site, which minimizes the body's exposure to the chemotherapeutic drugs."

The use of near infrared light also offers a number of advantages. Unlike ultraviolet light and high-energy radiation like X-rays or gamma rays, near infrared light is not toxic. It can also reach up to a few centimeters (about an inch) inside tissues within the body, which ultraviolet light and short visible light cannot do.

Ultimately, the goal is to find a way to deliver effective cancer-fighting therapeutics while reducing bothersome side effects for patients.

"If our strategy is successful, it will be a significant advancement toward an effective and innovative treatment option that has minimal side effects for localized and inoperable advanced triple negative breast cancers," You said.

Collaborating with You on the project are Michael Ihnat, Ph.D. and Sukyung Woo, PhD, both colleagues at the OU College of Pharmacy.  
The research is funded by U.S. Department of Defense grant W81XWH-14-1-0392.

ABOUT THE STEPHENSON CANCER CENTER 
Oklahoma's only comprehensive academic cancer center, the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma is a nationally recognized leader in research and patient care. The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top five cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead centers nationally in the Institute's National Clinical Trials Network. In collaboration with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is decreasing the burden of cancer in Oklahoma by supporting innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research. The Stephenson Cancer Center has 180 research members who are conducting over 100 cancer research projects at institutions across Oklahoma. This research is supported by $28.7 million in annual funding from the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society and other sponsors.

ABOUT THE OU COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
The University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy is committed to contributing to society through state-of-the-art education and research as well as modern, innovative pharmacy practices and services. With more than 4200 graduates since 1896, the college helps ensure the public need for safe and effective pharmaceutical care is met.  
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1716Tue, 07 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Dean Elected Treasurer of OrganizationP. Kevin Rudeen, Ph.D., FASAHP, dean of the University of Oklahoma's College of Allied Health since 2007, has been elected treasurer of the Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions. Rudeen has served as an elected member of the Board of Directors for the organization since 2008. The national organization of more than 100 academic institutions, two professional associations and approximately 200 individual members is dedicated to addressing critical matters affecting allied health education, research and service. 

As treasurer, Rudeen will provide guidance and counsel to the Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions Board of Directors as to how to be the best stewards of the organization's resources and investments.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1712Tue, 07 Oct 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Pediatrician Joins PracticePediatrician Natalie Hart, M.D., has established her practice with OU Children's Physicians. 
      
Hart completed a pediatric residency at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. She earned her medical degree from the University of Nebraska College of Medicine, Omaha.
      
She is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics.
      
Hart sees patients in the OU Children's Physicians building, 1200 Children's Ave. For appointments, call (405) 271-6827.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1704Fri, 26 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Pediatrician Joins PracticePediatrician Reid Hebert, M.D., has established his practice with OU Children's Physicians. 
      
Hebert completed his pediatric residency at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where he also earned his medical degree. He earned his bachelor's degree with special distinction in zoology from OU in Norman.
      
He is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics.
      
Hebert sees patients in the OU Children's Physicians building, 1200 Children's Ave. For appointments, call (405) 271-6827.
        
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1703Fri, 26 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Cancer Specialist Joins Stephenson Cancer CenterMohamad Khawandanah, M.D., a hematologist-oncologist, has established his medical practice with the Stephenson Cancer Center. 
      
Khawandanah has a specific interest in diagnosing and treating patients with acute leukemia, lymphoma, chronic leukemia, myeloid disorders, hematologic malignancies and those needing bone marrow transplant. He is board certified in internal medicine.
      
Khawandanah completed a hematology-oncology fellowship at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where he also completed his internal medicine residency. He earned his medical degree in Jordan. 
      
Khawandanah is a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society of Hematology and American College of Physicians.
      
Khawandanah sees patients at the Stephenson Cancer Center, 800 N.E. 10th Street. For an appointment, call (405) 271-8299. 
        
Oklahoma's only comprehensive academic cancer center, the Stephenson Cancer Center is a nationally recognized leader in research and patient care. The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top five cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead centers nationally in the Institute's National Clinical Trials Network. In collaboration with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is decreasing the burden of cancer in Oklahoma by supporting innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research. The Stephenson Cancer Center has 180 research members who are conducting over 100 cancer research projects at institutions across Oklahoma. This research is supported by $28.7 million in annual funding from the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society and other sponsors.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1702Fri, 26 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Senior Health Care in Oklahoma Receives $11.5 Million in Support The University of Oklahoma Health and Sciences Center has been awarded a three-year $11.5 million grant by the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation to further efforts to improve the health of seniors in Oklahoma.

The grant will provide critical funding for the Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative, a senior health initiative of the OU College of Medicine's Department of Geriatric Medicine.

"As the population of our state and nation continues to age, it is vital that academic-based medical centers, like ours, remain at the forefront of advancing scientific knowledge of the aging process and evidence-based treatment of health concerns that may arise with advancing age," said Dr. M. Dewayne Andrews, senior vice president and provost of the OU Health Sciences Center and executive dean of the OU College of Medicine. "The Donald W. Reynolds Foundation has been a valued ally as we work to improve senior health in Oklahoma and we are honored to be the recipients of this generous grant."

The Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative aims to support Oklahoma's seniors through a variety of programs that center on three key objectives:

        Increasing senior and caregiver access to inter-professional geriatric care
        Providing health education to consumers as well as health care providers
        Optimizing Oklahoma's current health and aging policy

The new grant will fund phase two of the initiative, which expands and builds on previous successes of the program. 

"The Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative has helped us establish important inroads as we work to improve senior health statewide," said Dr. Laurence Rubenstein, chairman of the Donald W. Reynolds Department of Geriatric Medicine at OU. "The Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative has opened three Centers of Healthy Aging across the state already, allowing us to serve seniors in 47 of Oklahoma's 77 counties. With this grant, we will be able to add additional centers, expanding our reach to every county in the state."

The Centers of Healthy Aging serve as hubs providing both clinical care and health education to citizens in the region.

"We look forward to being able to expand our work through the Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative," said Dr. Andrew Dentino, Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative director and vice chairman of the Department of Geriatrics. "Already, this initiative has achieved great success for seniors in our state. We welcome the opportunity to further our educational activities for both seniors and health care professionals, to continue work already underway to better assess the needs and interests of older Oklahomans, to increase awareness of geriatric health concerns overall, and to help train the next generation of senior health care providers."

Surveys conducted through the Initiative have verified a need for more trained senior health caregivers in Oklahoma. The new grant will enable initiative leaders to implement a certified home caregiver training program aimed at increasing the number of qualified caregivers in the workforce and also better equipping family members to perform necessary tasks when they become caregivers to elderly loved ones.

The grant also provides the funding required to add three satellite centers to better address the needs of seniors in some of the most underserved areas of the state.  

"The Reynolds Foundation is immensely proud of the critical work that the Donald W. Reynolds Department of Geriatric Medicine is doing to bring geriatrics medical care and education to the state of Oklahoma," said Steve Anderson, president, Donald W. Reynolds Foundation. "Our goal is to improve the health of older people living throughout Oklahoma and the Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative is doing just that."

The Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative was launched on the premise that good health is key to successful aging. The Institute is focused on increasing access to healthcare and providing important health education to seniors, their caregivers and healthcare providers statewide.

The Donald W. Reynolds Foundation is a national philanthropic organization founded in 1954 by the late media entrepreneur for whom it is named. Headquartered in Las Vegas, it has committed over $258 million nationwide through the Aging and Quality of Life Program.
 
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The media briefing on this topic can be viewed at: http://www.universityhospitalsauthority.com/streaming/viewer/   
 
Video for download by the media of the briefing along with support footage is available at this link: 
Senior Health.mov
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1699Wed, 24 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
OU Internal Medicine Resident Receives National Research AwardA medical resident at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center is one of only 10 nationwide selected for a prestigious research award. 

Hossein Maymani, M.D., chief internal medicine resident at the OU College of Medicine, is recipient of the American Society of Hematology’s 2014 HONORS Award. 

The HONORS (Hematology Opportunities for the Next Generation of Research Scientists) Award is designed to encourage medical students and residents who have a demonstrated interest in conducting hematology research, but who have not yet entered a hematology-related training program, to pursue a research career in the field. 

"This award from the American Society of Hematology is a tribute to the dedication of Dr. Maymani and to the quality of his research projects here at the OU Health Sciences Center," said M. Dewayne Andrews, M.D., MACP, OU Health Sciences Center senior vice president and provost and executive dean of the OU College of Medicine. "Advancing excellence in medical research is among our top goals at the OU College of Medicine, and programs like this one help young researchers gain a stronger foothold in the field. We congratulate Dr. Maymani on this achievement." 

As part of the award, Maymani will receive a $5,000 stipend to conduct research with a mentor on a short- or long-term research project. In addition, he will receive another $1,000 annual stipend for two years to support his attendance at the annual American Society of Hematology meeting. 

The Society hopes the HONORS award ultimately will help develop the next generation of hematologists by supporting hematology research and introducing them to valuable contacts within the hematology research community.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1695Thu, 18 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Maternal Fetal Medicine Specialist Joins OU PhysiciansJennifer McIntosh, D.O., has established her medical practice with OU Physicians Prenatal Diagnostic Center.
      
McIntosh sees women who are experiencing complications during pregnancy. She completed a maternal fetal medicine fellowship at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. She completed an obstetrics-gynecology residency at Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, and earned her doctorate in osteopathic medicine at Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, East Lansing. She earned a master's degree in clinical and translational science through the OU College of Medicine. 
      
McIntosh is a member of the Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.
      
OU Physicians maternal fetal medicine specialists see patients on the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Campus. For an appointment with an OU Physicians maternal fetal medicine specialist, call (405) 271-5400.
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1693Wed, 17 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Cardiologist Joins PracticeCardiologist Nicole Tintera Tran, M.D., has established her medical practice with OU Physicians. She is also an assistant professor of medicine for the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.  
      
Tran is board certified in internal medicine. She is board eligible in cardiovascular disease, echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography and nuclear cardiology.
      
Tran completed a fellowship in cardiovascular medicine at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where she also completed a residency. She earned her medical degree at the OU College of Medicine and earned her bachelor's degree at OU in Norman.
      
Tran sees patients on the OU Health Sciences Center campus at 825 N.E. 10th Street, suite 2500. For appointments, call (405) 271-7001.
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1692Wed, 17 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Children's experts note uptick in respiratory virus infections: State and Federal Health Officials Studying Whether Illnesses Are Related to EV-D68Experts at The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center are reporting an increase in the number of hospitalizations from respiratory viruses while state and national health officials are trying to identify if those illnesses are related to a virus that has sickened more than 1,000 children across the Midwest. 
 
From Aug. 1-28 this year, 115 patients have tested positive for rhinovirus/enterovirus illnesses compared to 75 during the same time last year. Most of those patients were at The Children's Hospital, though some were also at OU Medical Center, the adult hospital. Some of those patients were sent to the pediatric intensive care unit at Children's. 
 
Health officials in Oklahoma are currently testing samples from Children's patients to determine if any are Enterovirus 68, or EV-D68, a viral illness that has been identified most recently in Missouri, where it sickened more than 300 children, sending as many as 15 percent to the intensive care unit at a pediatric hospital in Kansas City. 
 
Dr. Robert Welliver, chief of pediatric infectious diseases at The OU College of Medicine, said health care experts have been watching the activity of Enterovirus 68 for some time. 

"Enterovirus 68 has been present in the U.S. for some time, but at very low levels of activity. More extensive outbreaks have occurred in the Philippines and in Japan, where fatal infections have occurred in smokers and persons with asthma," he said. "Increased activity has been noted in the past month in the Midwest, and while some cases have been severe, none have been fatal to our knowledge."

Enteroviruses are very common viruses, and there are more than 100 types of enteroviruses. Most people infected with enteroviruses have no symptoms or only mild symptoms, but some infections can be serious. EV-D68 usually can cause mild to severe respiratory illness requiring only treatment of the symptoms. Some people with severe respiratory illness caused by EV-D68 may need to be hospitalized. 
 
Background
 
•         Enteroviruses are very common viruses; there are more than 100 types. 
 
•         It is estimated that 10 to 15 million enterovirus infections occur in the United States each year.
 
•         Most people infected with enteroviruses have no symptoms or only mild symptoms, but some infections can be serious. 
 
•         Infants, children and teenagers are most likely to get infected with enteroviruses and become sick.
 
•         Most enterovirus infections in the United States occur seasonally during the summer and fall.
 
Enterovirus D68:

•         Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) infections are thought to occur less commonly than infections with other enteroviruses.
 
Symptoms

•         EV-D68 usually can cause mild to severe respiratory illness. However, the full spectrum of EV-D68 illness is not well defined.

Transmission

 EV-D68, like other enteroviruses, appears to spread through close contact with infected people.
 
Treatment

 There is no specific treatment for EV-D68 infections.
 •  Many infections will be mild and self-limited, requiring only treatment of the symptoms.
 •  Some people with severe respiratory illness caused by EV-D68 may need to be hospitalized and receive intensive supportive therapy.

 No anti-viral medications are currently available for treating of EV-D68 infections.
 
Prevention

 There are no vaccines for preventing EV-D68 infections. 
 
 Ways to help reduce the risk of getting infected with EV-D68:
 •  Wash hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds, especially after changing diapers
 •  Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands
 •  Avoid kissing, hugging, and sharing cups or eating utensils with people who are sick
 •  Disinfect frequently touched surfaces, such as toys and doorknobs, especially if someone is sick

Guidance to Parents

 Children with cold like symptoms that experience difficulty breathing, are asked to consult with their family physician for further evaluation.

 There will not be a daily count of cases as  U.S. healthcare professionals are not required to report known or suspected cases of EV-D68 infection to health departments because it is not a reportable disease in the United States. Also, CDC does not have a surveillance system that specifically collects information on EV-D68 infections.


SOURCE: The Oklahoma State Department of Health and CDC

Do you have questions about whether you or your loved one’s symptoms are emergency room worthy? Read more here

 
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THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL AT OU MEDICAL CENTER
The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center has 326 inpatient beds and is the only freestanding comprehensive children's hospital in Oklahoma. The Children's Hospital's pediatric staff  have years of specialized pediatric training with education, research and technology to treat conditions ranging from cardiothoracic and oncology-related illnesses to neonatal specialty care and pediatric solid-organ transplants. The Children's Hospital's 88-bed Neonatal Intensive Care Unit provides the highest level of neonatal care in Oklahoma. The Children's Hospital was one of the first hospitals in the country to provide total, comprehensive care for mothers and their newborns all in the same building. Additionally, the Women's & Newborn Center at The Children's Hospital provides family-centered newborn care for all types of deliveries—from routine to complicated, high-risk births—and offers the most comprehensive obstetrics program in the state. The Children's Hospital is nationally ranked by U.S. News and World Report in its 2013 survey. To find out more, visit www.oumedicine.com/childrens or www.facebook.com/okchildrens.
 
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1683Mon, 08 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Radiologist Joins OU Physicians William Vanlandingham, M.D., an interventional radiologist, has established his medical practice at OU Physicians. An interventional radiologist utilizes minimally invasive image-guided procedures to diagnose and treat diseases.
      
Vanlandingham performs a wide range of interventional procedures, including arterial and venous angiography (a procedure to help view the arteries and veins), hepatobiliary interventions (relating to the liver, gall bladder and bile ducts), interventions in transplant patients as well as numerous gastrointestinal, genito-urinary and other percutaneous procedures (using a needle to access inner organs). He has a specific interest in interventional cancer treatments. 
      
Vanlandingham is board certified in diagnostic radiology. He completed a vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at the University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, and a residency at the University of Missouri, Kansas City. He earned his medical degree from the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and his undergraduate degree from Oklahoma State University. 
      
Vanlandingham is a member of the Society of Interventional Radiology, American Board of Radiology and Radiological Society of North America.
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state’s largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region’s future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1678Fri, 05 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Neurologist Joins OU Physicians Neurologist Christi Pendergraft, M.D., has established her medical practice with OU Physicians. Neurologists diagnose and treat disorders of the central nervous system such as headache, seizure, stroke, dementia and Parkinson’s disease.
      
Pendergraft has a specific interest in treating headache patients. She completed her neurology residency at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where she also earned her medical degree. She earned her undergraduate degree at OU in Norman.  
      
She is a member of the American Academy of Neurology.
      
Pendergraft sees patients on the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center campus. For an appointment with an OU Physicians neurologist, call (405) 271-3635. 
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state’s largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region’s future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1676Thu, 04 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Electrophysiologist Joins PracticePaul J. Garabelli, M.D., an electrophysiologist, has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. He has also been named an assistant professor at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. 
      
Electrophysiologists are physicians who specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of heart rhythm disorders. Garabelli specializes in implanting and removing pacemakers and defibrillators and performing catheter ablations to treat conditions such as atrial fibrillation.
      
Garabelli is board certified in cardiology and internal medicine and board eligible in electrophysiology. He completed a clinical electrophysiology fellowship and a cardiology fellowship at the OU College of Medicine. He completed his internal medicine residency and served as chief resident at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston. He earned his medical degree from Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, N.C.
      
Garabelli sees patients at the OU Physicians Building, 825 N.E. 10th Street. For an appointment with an OU Physicians electrophysiologist or cardiologist, call (405) 271-7001.
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state’s largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region’s future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1675Thu, 04 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Neurologists Join OU PhysiciansNeurologist Aaron Farrow, M.D., has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. Neurologists diagnose and treat disorders of the central nervous system such as headache, seizure, stroke, dementia and Parkinson’s disease.
      
Farrow will see all general neurology patients and is specifically interested in diagnosing and treating patients with cerebrovascular disease and multiple sclerosis. He completed a neurology residency at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where he also earned his medical degree. He earned his undergraduate degree at Southern Nazarene University, Bethany, graduating magna cum laude.
     
Farrow is a member of the American Academy of Neurology.
      
OU Physicians neurologists see patients on the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center campus. For an appointment, call (405) 271-3635. 
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state’s largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region’s future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1674Thu, 04 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Awareness Day AnnouncedThe Center on Child Abuse and Neglect at OU Children's Physicians is joining the cause to increase awareness of the risks of drinking alcohol while pregnant. In recognition of International Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Day, Governor Mary Fallin has proclaimed September 9, 2014, as Oklahoma Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Day.    
      
"The date -- ninth month and ninth day – symbolizes the nine-month gestation period," explained Tatiana Balachova, Ph.D., of the Center on Child Abuse and Neglect. Balachova is also an associate professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.
      
The U.S. Surgeon General advises pregnant women and women who are considering becoming pregnant to abstain from alcohol consumption to eliminate alcohol-exposed pregnancies, referred to as Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders. Yet it is estimated that 40,000 babies are born each year with the disorders. 
      
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders are caused by a woman drinking alcohol during pregnancy. Alcohol in the mother's blood passes to the baby through the placenta and the umbilical cord. 
      
"When a woman drinks alcohol, so does her baby," Balachova explained. "There is no known safe amount or type of alcohol to drink during pregnancy. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders can impact children's physical, mental, behavioral, or cognitive development."
      
The most recognized condition of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, fetal alcohol syndrome , is characterized by growth deficiencies, central nervous system disabilities and specific facial characteristics. It is the most preventable form of intellectual disability. The number of children born with fetal alcohol syndrome alone is comparable to spina bifida or Down syndrome.
     
Balachova added that to prevent Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorderss, a woman should not drink alcohol while she is pregnant or if she might be pregnant. This is because a woman often does not know she is pregnant for up to four to six weeks after conception. In the U.S., nearly half of all pregnancies are unplanned. 
      
"If a woman is drinking alcohol during pregnancy, it is never too late to stop drinking," Balachova said. "Because brain growth takes place throughout pregnancy, the sooner a woman stops drinking, the safer it will be for her and her baby."
      
For more information on alcohol use during pregnancy and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, visit www.cdc.gov/fasd and http://www.nofas.org/.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1669Wed, 03 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Neurologist/Neurointerventionalist Joins OU Physicians Neurologist Ankur Garg, M.D., has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. Neurologists diagnose and treat disorders of the central nervous system such as stroke, brain hemorrhage, headache, seizure, dementia, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and more. 
      
Garg has additional experience in endovascular treatment of stroke, aneurysms, vascular malformations and fistulae (groups of abnormal blood vessels that connect arteries to veins) as well as carotid disease for both adult and pediatric patients.
      
Garg is board certified in vascular neurology and general neurology. His training includes fellowships in endovascular surgical neuroradiology (neurointervention) and vascular neurology at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where he also completed his neurology residency. He earned his medical degree in India.
      
Garg is a member of several academic societies including the Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology, Society of Neurointerventional Surgery, World Federation of Interventional and Therapeutic Neuroradiology, American Heart Association and American Academy of Neurology.
      
OU Physicians neurologists see patients on the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center campus. For an appointment, call (405) 271-3635. 
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1668Wed, 03 Sep 2014 00:00:00 GMT
OU Vice Provost Receives Award for Achievements in Faculty DevelopmentValerie N. Williams, vice provost for academic affairs and faculty development at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, has been selected as the recipient of the 2014 Carole J. Bland Phronesis Award from the Association of American Medical College's Group on Faculty Affairs. Williams received the award at the group's professional development conference recently in Boston.

According to the group, "Williams, whose excellence as an innovator, a nurturer/mentor, a leader and an educator/academician, as well as her regional and national impact in the areas of faculty affairs and faculty development, exemplifies the criteria established for the award."

The association's Group on Faculty Affairs builds and sustains faculty vitality in medical schools and teaching hospitals by supporting faculty affairs deans and administrators in their development and implementation of institutional policies and professional development activities. The Carole J. Bland Phronesis Award serves to honor members of the faculty affairs community who exemplify the spirit of phronesis – acting for the welfare of others without thought for the self; seeking and enabling heroically the development and success of others – through dedicated and selfless promotion of faculty vitality.

Since coming to the OU Health Sciences Center in 1989, Williams has served in a variety of faculty development and leadership posts, including as associate dean for faculty affairs in the OU College of Medicine and interim associate dean for academic programs in the OU College of Nursing. In her current capacity, Williams sponsors and guides faculty development and teaches in the OU Health Sciences Center's interprofessional faculty development program which includes faculty from each of the OU health professions colleges and the graduate college. She also has remained active as a principal investigator, and during the past 10 years has served as private investigator or sponsor for more than $18 million in competitively awarded grants and contracts.

Williams served as chair of the Association of American Medical College's board of directors in 2013. The association serves and leads the academic medicine community to improve the health of all, and represents all 141 accredited U.S. and 17 accredited Canadian medical schools; nearly 400 major teaching hospitals and health systems, including 51 Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers; and 90 academic and scientific societies.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1662Fri, 29 Aug 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Family Structure Impacts Risk for Obesity in ChildrenThe family structure in which a child is raised is significantly associated with behaviors that put him or her at risk for obesity, according to a study by researchers at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.

Childhood obesity is a growing issue in the United States. Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control show that obesity has more than doubled in children and quadrupled in adolescents in the past 30 years. Despite this, few studies have examined the relationship between family structure, environment and behaviors linked to obesity, said principal investigator Susan Sisson, Ph.D., an assistant professor of behavioral nutrition in the OU College of Allied Health.

"Before the study we did not know if one size fit all, but we now know some kids are at a higher risk for obesity-promoting behaviors because the risk is not equally distributed among all the family structures," Sisson said.

For instance, siblings appear to provide some protection against obesity. In the study, the presence of a sibling was generally associated with lower obesity-promoting behaviors and more physical activity, regardless of marital status. However, the presence of a sibling did not completely eliminate the risk of engaging in obesity-promoting behaviors for a child in a single-mother or blended household.

"This is one of the first studies of its kind in the United States. Previous studies show children of divorced parents are more likely to be overweight, but we wanted to see if children living with single mothers and in two-parent, blended families were more at risk for engaging in obesity-promoting behaviors," Sisson said.

A novel finding of the study is that living in a household with two parents does not necessarily protect against behaviors that increase the risk for childhood obesity. 
In fact, if the family is a blended one, the risk increases substantially.  

The findings provide new insights on data originally collected through the National Survey of Children's Health. That survey was administered to more than 55,000 households with children under the age of 17 nationwide between April 2007 and July 2008.

Family structure was defined by the number of siblings and the parent's marital status. Each household was classified into one of four categories: two-parent biological or adoptive, two-parent blended family (divorced, but remarried), single mother, and other. 

Behaviors and environments linked to increased risk for obesity in the study included elevated television-watching time, the presence of a television in the child's bedroom, infrequent family meals and insufficient physical activity. 

Study results showed children living in a two-parent, blended family were 75 percent more likely to have a TV in their bedroom and children in single-mother households were 49 percent more likely compared to children who live with biological or adoptive parents. 

Children in two parent, blended homes were also more likely than any other category to watch an elevated amount of television.

Previous studies have linked increased television-viewing time and having a television in the bedroom to a higher risk for obesity in children. 

"Parents highly underestimate the amount of time their children are watching TV, especially if children have a television in their bedroom," Sisson explained.

The study also found children in single-mother homes were 28 percent more likely to have infrequent family meals. 

"We are not placing value on living circumstances," said Sisson of the research, "but we want to understand the risks associated with these."

Sisson said while childhood obesity may not be the first thing parents worry about when facing divorce or remarriage, the study points to the need to focus more attention on their children's health in these circumstances. 

"When a family separates, it is a difficult time for families. If these obesogenic behaviors surface as a coping pattern, we want to be able to give these families tools to help children better cope," she said.

Authors of the study noted that more research needs to be done to examine other living situations, like children who live with their grandparents.

They say their ultimate goal is to learn more so that interventions can be tailored to each child and family to prevent obesity and better ensure that all children grow into healthy adults. 

The study results are published in the Journal of Preventive Medicine.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1661Thu, 28 Aug 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Leading in Leadership Education
A new $250,000 gift will place the University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy at the heart of leadership in the education of future pharmacists in the United States. The five-year gift from CVS Caremark will fund development of a pharmacy leadership institute at the college.
 
The gift funds a leadership initiative that is a first of its kind. It will allow the college to build upon curriculum already in place to create the new leadership institute. 
 
"We are very excited to lead a national effort in leadership education and training for pharmacy students," said Associate Dean for Student Affairs Jane E. Wilson, Ph.D. "We foresee our institute becoming the major leadership development resource for pharmacy schools across the country."
 
About 50 students at the college are currently enrolled in a three-year program that involves curriculum aimed at training future pharmacists to be outstanding leaders in both the field of pharmacy and in their communities. 
"This curriculum teaches students how to be effective change agents with the ability to guide others in implanting positive change that best serves the profession and its patients," said Michael Smith, Ph.D., assistant dean for Tulsa Operations and coordinator of the leadership degree option at the OU College of Pharmacy.

In addition to establishing the new national leadership institute, the OU College of Pharmacy plans to establish a national summer symposium for leadership development for pharmacy students across the United States. College leadership hopes to have the summer leadership program up and running by 2015.

The gift will also fund development of the CVS Caremark Leadership Library, a resource library serving students and colleges of pharmacy nationwide. 
 
"The long-term plan is to extend leadership education and open it up to students studying for careers in other health care professions, like medicine, nursing and dentistry," Wilson said. 
 
 "We are pleased to be able to support OU College of Pharmacy's pursuit of educating innovative pharmacy leaders for tomorrow," said CVS Caremark's Director of Pharmacy Recruiting Amy Holland, Pharm.D. "As pharmacy evolves and we see changes in healthcare, it is truly important to prepare students to become clinicians, managers and leaders.  I look forward to our continued relationship as we strive for excellence together."
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1660Wed, 27 Aug 2014 00:00:00 GMT
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1252
Conquering Pain with TechnologyPain takes a terrible toll on those who suffer from it and on society as a whole, affecting more Americans than diabetes, heart disease and cancer combined.

Chronic pain is the most common cause of long-term disability, according to the National Institutes of Health.

So perhaps it is not surprising that interest in new technologies targeting pain have drawn increased interest from patients and practitioners alike.

Among those is a group of rapidly evolving medical interventions known as neurostimulation. Much like a "pacemaker" for pain, neurostimulators offer a minimally invasive, reversible therapy that delivers highly focused electrical stimulation to the brain, spinal cord or peripheral nerves with the goal of decreasing chronic pain symptoms, helping restore function and improving quality of life.

With more than 25,000 neurostimulators implanted worldwide each year, a University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center scientist has joined other pain experts across the globe in an effort to better ensure these devices are used in the right ways with the right patients.

The International Neuromodulation Society has published their work – the first peer-reviewed comprehensive expert guidance on the appropriate use of neurostimulation for pain.

"The Neuromodulation Appropriateness Consensus Committee came into being because there is a limited amount of information and there are a limited number of patients out there," said Robert Foreman, Ph.D., George Lynn Cross Research Professor of Physiology and adjunct professor of Anesthesiology at the OU College of Medicine. "Today, we have more flexibility in treating different kinds of problems and unique challenges that arise in patients with chronic pain. We need an understanding of what the limitations of these technologies are and how they function so that they can be used appropriately."

Foreman, the only basic scientist on the committee, said developing consensus previously had not been easy because pain is seen by physicians in various specialties and little research has been done to address its mechanisms.

Neurostimulation targets pain signaling in the body, specifically pain signals carried through circuits in the spinal cord. 

"There seems to be a balance between large fibers that control suppression of pain and small fibers that carry noxious information that is experienced as pain," Foreman said. "Two scientists, Dr. Ron Melzack and Dr. Patrick Wall, put together the gate control theory, which means there are controls that turn on and shut off that signaling. If the gateway is open, signals that can be interpreted as pain get to the brain. However, if you activate the large fibers, that in some way seems to release natural-occurring transmitters that can decrease the amount of information carried to the brain."

He explained the concept with an analogy of bumping your arm really hard.

"You instinctively rub your arm. In so doing, you are stimulating the large fibers that carry touch and that seems to decrease the sensation of pain," Foreman said.

The same concept is utilized in neurostimulation. Neurostimulators typically consist of three parts: electrical leads or wires that deliver mild electric current generally to specific areas of the spine or neck; an impulse generator that may be worn externally at first, then implanted in a small pocket usually in the fleshy area of the upper hip or abdomen; and a patient remote control that allows patients to switch between previously set stimulation parameters programmed for their specific needs.

The new recommendations address several critical areas. They provide guidance on neurostimulation risk management and how to avoid complications as well as recommendations for the appropriate education training and environments for neurostimulation procedures. There is also a discussion focused on neurostimulation procedures of the head and brain, including treatment of intractable migraines and cluster headaches. Finally, they offer insights into cutting-edge future and technological developments, new devices and future potential applications of neurostimulation.

"The message that we are trying to get across is that there has to be communication between the basic scientist and the clinician to ensure that there is information going from what we learn in the lab to what they can use in the clinic. In addition, what they learn from patients in the clinic may generate questions that we can work to answer in the lab," Foreman said.

The goal is a system that freely delivers information from bench to bedside and back again to ultimately improve care for patients with chronic pain. Dr. Gretchen Wienecke, a pain specialist with OU Physicians, says the new guidance will help ensure that the technology is properly applied in clinical care.

"Neurostimulation is not for every patient. Every patient is unique, and the more information we have as clinicians, the better able we are to meet the many, varied needs of our patients," she said. "These guidelines also help raise the bar on safety to ensure that these procedures are done in appropriately selected patients by well-trained medical specialists in the appropriate setting to help further elevate safety and effectiveness." 

The guidance articles are published in the current issue of Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1655Mon, 25 Aug 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Back to School Boosters
Parents of an Elk City toddler hospitalized as an infant with severe symptoms of a potentially deadly disease have joined doctors and health officials in urging children, pregnant women and other adults to join a different sort of booster club this year.
 
This club has nothing to do with sports and everything to do with protecting infants from a potentially fatal illness – pertussis, also commonly known as whooping cough.
 
Pertussis is a bacterial infection characterized by fits of coughing, followed by a "whoop" sound from the attempt to inhale.
 
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention saw a 24 percent increase in reported cases of pertussis in the first six months of this year compared to the same time period last year with 9,964 cases reported in 50 states and Washington, D.C. between January 1 and June 16 of this year.
 
The resurgence of pertussis in recent years has brought new recommendations for booster shots for school-aged children, pregnant women and any adults who may be around newborn babies.
 
"It is just so terribly important that people understand the need to protect babies from this disease" said Devyn Galmor, whose son Cullen spent weeks battling for his life after developing severe symptoms of pertussis. Cullen's illness came shortly after another Elk City baby died of the disease in 2012.
 
"A booster shot is an additional dose of vaccine that essentially boosts the body's immune response as immunity to the disease wanes over time," said Dr. Robert Welliver, an infectious disease specialist with OU Physicians. "We know that the combination diptheria, tetanus, pertussis vaccine is about 98 percent effective in the first year, but immunity wanes over time. After five years, it is only about 70 percent effective."
 
Work is underway to develop a new, more effective pertussis vaccine, but researchers are likely at least ten years away from achieving that goal. Welliver said that is where booster shots come in, filling any immunity gap that may exist while a vaccine to produce more long-lasting protection is developed.
 
"We cannot afford to be casual about vaccination," he said. "As doctors, we would much rather prevent a disease than treat it. Vaccinations are the best way to do that. And because newborns are too young to be vaccinated for pertussis, it is critical that those around them are vaccinated."
 
Of children under six months of age who contract pertussis, 72 percent must be hospitalized, and 84 percent of all deaths from pertussis occur among children in this age group. A child who gets sick with pertussis in the United States has a one in ten chance of dying, according to the National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition.
 
Recently, in an effort to help better protect newborns from pertussis, new guidelines also were issued for pregnant women. The CDC now recommends that all pregnant women, even those previously vaccinated, receive the pertussis vaccine for adolescents and adults (called Tdap) during the third trimester of pregnancy.
 
"This recommendation replaces the original one that pregnant women get the vaccine only if they had not previously received it," said Dr. Landon Lorenz, OU Physicians obstetrician and gynecologist. "It is believed the best time to get the vaccine is between your 27th and 36th week of pregnancy. Getting the vaccine while pregnant is ideal so that your baby will have short-term protection as soon as he or she is born."
 
Lorenz said the early protection is especially important because babies do not get their first pertussis vaccine until they are 2 months old and the first few months of life are when babies are most at risk for catching pertussis and having severe, potentially life-threatening complications from it.
 
In addition, women should be vaccinated with each pregnancy, he said, to ensure that high levels of protective antibodies are transferred to each of your babies.
 
Cullen is now 2 year old. To see him play with his 6-year-old twin brothers, Carsen and Cale, at their Elk City home, few would guess the boisterous toddler spent the earliest weeks of his life hospitalized, fighting for every breath.  
 
"He's a real spitfire now," said Levy Galmor.
 
Still Levy hopes no other family has to face what they did. Though time has passed, they still remember vividly the difficult days they spent at Cullen's side at The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center as a team of specialists worked to help save their son's life.
 
"No one should have to go through that − not when something as simple as getting a shot can help protect these babies," said Devyn Galmor, who has become a vocal advocate for vaccination. "It is just too important not to talk about this. People need to know that while getting that shot might not save their lives, it may save the life of a baby or child in their own family or community."
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1638Mon, 04 Aug 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Pediatric Anesthesiologist Joins OU Children's Physicians Lauren Sparks, M.D., has established her medical practice with OU Children's Physicians. Anesthesiologists specialize in the use of drugs and other means to avert or reduce pain in patients, especially during surgery.
      
Sparks completed a pediatric anesthesiology fellowship at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where she also completed a residency and earned her medical degree. She is a graduate of Oklahoma School of Science and Mathematics.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1637Thu, 31 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Neurologist Joins OU PhysiciansNeurologist Tyler Webb, M.D., has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. Neurologists diagnose and treat disorders of the central nervous system such as headache, seizure, stroke, dementia and Parkinson’s disease.
      
Webb is board certified in neurology. He completed a neurophysiology fellowship at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where he had completed his neurology residency and earned his medical degree. For his undergraduate coursework, he attended OU in Norman.
      
OU Physicians neurologists see patients on the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center campus. For an appointment, call (405) 271-3635. 
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state’s largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region’s future physicians.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1636Thu, 31 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Training Enhances Nurse-Parent CommunicationThe University of Oklahoma College of Nursing has long emphasized that newly licensed nurses need training in people skills along with their technical training. Now, new research from the college reveals a specific type of communication training can effectively prepare less experienced nurses for emotionally difficult conversations with parents of children who are hospitalized.

The OU College of Nursing study utilized the Four Habits Model, a core set of communication skills developed 20 years ago to help physicians better communicate with patients. This marks the first time, however, the model has been adapted and used with pediatric nurses.

"The hospital experience is extremely stressful where parents' emotions are often expressed, either verbally or non-verbally. Nurses tend to be the ones typically at the child's bedside, they are also the ones who are frequently exposed to or witness parents' expressed emotions," said principal investigator Mark J. Fisher, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor, OU College of Nursing. 

The study, published in this month's issue of Patient Education and Counseling, found that newly licensed nurses with brief exposure to the Four Habits Model reported significant improvement in emotionally difficult conversations with parents of pediatric patients.

In the study, one group of nurses participated in a one-hour, three-part education simulation session. The control group observed a one-hour video.

Nurses in the intervention group participated in a simulation that set up a fictitious scenario involving a medication error, the second medication error with the child during hospitalization.  In the simulated scenario, the role-playing mother becomes especially upset expressing her intense emotions both verbally and non-verbally based on the current error which are amplified by the severity of the previous medication error her child experienced. 

"The purpose of the specific scenario was to provide nurses with a simulated experience where empathy was the primary focus,” Fisher said.

Nurses in the simulation group were taught to apply an adapted version of the Four Habits Model for nurse-parent communication. The Four Habits Model was co-developed 20 years ago by Indiana University Regenstrief Institute investigator Richard Frankel, Ph.D., who was also an author of the study. The adapted version of the Four Habits Model used in this study included these principles:  
-      Invest in the beginning
-      Elicit the parent's perspective 
-      Demonstrate empathy
-      Invest in the end

Fisher said applying the Four Habits Model to the scenario meant the nurse first introduces himself or herself and explains to the mother what has happened; asks for and listens to the mother express her concerns; acknowledges the mother's emotions and that her concerns are understood; and finally collaborates and partners with the mother to develop a plan on what is to be done next to close or end the conversation in a positive way.

The study measured five areas – preparation, communication skills, relationships, confidence and anxiety. It found nurses in the Four Habits Model improved in four of the five areas measured.  Nurses in the study did not demonstrate a decrease in anxiety as hypothesized, however.  Researchers stress that is not necessarily bad because anxiety, when not excessive, can help lead to a higher level of vigilance, which is a critical to prevent errors.    

Fisher noted the standardized patient, acting as a parent in the intervention, along with the role-playing setting that included a hospital room decorated with children's drawings and a life-like mannequin in the hospital bed was meant to closely mimic the hospital setting. Nurses involved in the experiment indicated they appreciated the emphasis upon realism. 

"I think that was one of the most meaningful comments from a number of them was how real the experience felt,” said Fisher.

Improved caregiver-patient communications is one of the tenets of a campus-wide initiative begun almost a decade ago at the OU Health Sciences Center aimed at advancing excellence in care.

Although Fisher's study involved a limited number of pediatric nurses, he believes it points to the need for further study and perhaps the inclusion of still more of this type of communications training for nurses beginning their careers in health care.

"I am really excited about the possibilities of doing more with the Four Habits Model here at the OU College of Nursing, and the possibility of working with other colleges or schools of nursing, as well as hospitals across the nation,” Fisher said. 

A research grant from Sigma Theta Tau International Beta Delta-at-Large Chapter supported this research.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1634Fri, 25 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMT
$18.4 Million Grant Awarded to Enhance Biomedical Research in OklahomaAn $18.4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health will advance biomedical research and workforce development across the state.

The five-year grant, one of the largest NIH grants in Oklahoma to date, was awarded to the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center from the NIH Institutional Development Award program to expand medical research and education in the areas of cancer, developmental biology and infectious disease. The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education will provide an additional $500,000 match annually to further enhance research and educational activities at Oklahoma's regional universities.

"The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education are committed to maintaining research as a priority in our state," said Chancellor Glen D. Johnson. "This award will enable Oklahoma researchers to continue working to find cures for diseases that affect citizens in our state, nation and around the world and will provide a structured system to increase the number of undergraduate students who continue their education and enter health-related fields in Oklahoma."

The IDeA Network for Biomedical Research Excellence (INBRE) grant will be managed by Dr. Darrin Akins, professor of microbiology and immunology, associate dean for research at the OUHSC College of Medicine and director of the Oklahoma INBRE Program. It is a multi-institutional award that utilizes senior scientists and faculty from OUHSC and the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation to mentor and provide guidance to scientists embarking on their own research and careers within the health profession across Oklahoma.

"This award is especially significant because it helps foster the careers of promising young scientists and health professionals in our state, which ultimately will bolster efforts to improve the health of all Oklahomans," said University of Oklahoma President David L. Boren.

State-of-the-art research equipment will also be funded through the grant to improve the research infrastructure at Oklahoma colleges and universities. In addition, the grant supports numerous outreach activities geared toward high school teachers and students, as well as faculty and undergraduate students at colleges and universities throughout the state.

"This award is important as we work to further our mission of advancing scientific knowledge and patient care. It addresses important public health issues, including the spread of antibiotic-resistant infections, cancer and diabetes. It also enhances community outreach efforts aimed at elevating the number and quality of students preparing for careers in medical research and health professions," said M. Dewayne Andrews, M.D., MACP, senior vice president and provost of OUHSC and executive dean of the OU College of Medicine.

Regional university research partners supported by the grant include:
•Cameron University
•Langston University
•Northeastern State University
•Southeastern Oklahoma State University
•Southwestern Oklahoma State University
•University of Central Oklahoma

Community college outreach partners include:
•Comanche Nation College
•Oklahoma City Community College
•Redlands Community College
•Tulsa Community College

In addition, the grant funds an annual summer research program providing more than 40 Oklahoma college undergraduates with hands-on biomedical research experiences at the OUHSC campus and OMRF, as well as a statewide conference to encourage women and underrepresented minorities to enter health-related careers and an annual conference showcasing Oklahoma undergraduate research.

The Institutional Development Awards program is administered by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences at the NIH. The program is designed to augment biomedical research capacity and workforce development opportunities in states where NIH funding has historically been low.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1633Mon, 21 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Infant Hepatitis B Vaccination Provides Long-Lasting ProtectionVaccines given in infancy to guard against hepatitis B continue to provide protection in adolescence, according to a study by a researcher at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and colleagues in Texas.
 
The study looked at children who received the recommended three doses of the hepatitis B vaccine during infancy.
 
It has been known for some time that children and adolescents who received the hepatitis B vaccination series had long-lasting protection against the disease. However, researchers said less is known about how long protection lasts when the vaccination series is administered in infancy.
 
"There was some concern that giving the dose in these little infants might change the duration of protection, necessitating a booster dose later in life," said Amy B. Middleman, M.D., M.S.Ed., M.P.H., principal investigator and chief of adolescent medicine at the OU College of Medicine.

So researchers looked at teenagers, 16 to 19 years of age, who had been vaccinated against hepatitis B as infants.

The study involved 420 teenagers who had received all three doses of the hepatitis B vaccine before the age of one. Researchers focused on immune response to a dose of vaccine given to the participants to mimic exposure to the disease, referred to as a challenge dose. They measured antibody levels in the teens before and after exposure to the challenge dose of vaccine.
 
"Pediatricians were voicing concern because they would run blood tests to determine the degree of protection for their patients and they would find that their patients' hepatitis B antibody levels were zero," Middleman said.  "So the providers felt they needed to give the patients a booster dose of vaccine for protection."

Prior to the challenge dose, most of the teens in the study (76 percent) showed antibody levels lower than what is thought necessary to protect against infection. However, the study found that 92 percent were, in fact, protected.  Following the challenge dose, their antibody levels exceeded that needed for protection against hepatitis B infection.
 
"Even among the adolescents who had zero or low levels of hepatitis B antibodies, the study showed these adolescents were still capable of mounting an immune response," Middleman said.

The study separated the teens into two groups: those who received the first dose of hepatitis B vaccine within seven days of birth and those who received it at or after four weeks of age.
 
Although the study found those immunized a little later in infancy mounted a more vigorous immune response, the same proportion of adolescents in each group achieved a response that indicates protection from the disease.
 
"Based on these data, it does not appear a booster dose of the hepatitis B vaccine is needed for adolescents who received all three doses of the vaccine as an infant; if a patient has been fully vaccinated, they are likely fully protected," Middleman said.

In 1991, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention initiated a comprehensive program for the elimination of hepatitis B in the United States. A large part of that strategy included the recommendation for universal immunization with recombinant hepatitis B vaccine in newborns.

Researchers pointed out that it will be important to follow up with a similar population 20 to 25 years after infant vaccination to see if protection against hepatitis B extends into the third decade of life.

The study was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention project 00HCVJHB-2009-67553
It is published online in Pediatrics, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1632Mon, 21 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Pediatric Emergency Medicine Physicians Join PracticeRyan T. Ericksen, D.O., and Dirk B. Verbrugghe, M.D., pediatric emergency medicine physicians, have established their practices with OU Children's Physicians. They see patients at The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. 
      
Both doctors are board certified in pediatrics. 
      
Ericksen completed a pediatric emergency medicine fellowship at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. He completed a pediatric residency at Cardinal Glennon Children's Hospital at St. Louis University, St. Louis, Mo. He earned his osteopathic medicine degree from Des Moines University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Des Moines, Iowa.
      
Verbrugghe completed a fellowship in pediatric emergency medicine at Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock. He completed his pediatric residency and served as chief resident at the OU College of Medicine. He earned his medical degree from Drexel University College of  Medicine, Philadelphia.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
Nearly 200 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1631Wed, 16 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Surgeon Joins PracticeDaniel C. Lee, M.D., has established his surgical practice with OU Physicians. He was also named an associate professor of surgery at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.
      
Lee is board certified in surgery and thoracic surgery. He specializes in adult cardiac surgery (most commonly coronary bypass and heart valve repair/replacement surgery).  In addition, he has extensive training and a strong interest in aortic surgery. The aorta is a large artery stemming from the heart and diseases such as aneurysm and dissection frequently require surgical repair.
      
Lee completed a cardiothoracic surgery fellowship at Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University (formerly Cornell University Medical College), N.Y., and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, N.Y. He completed his surgery residency at Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn., and a National Institutes of Health fellowship at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, N.Y. He earned his medical degree at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. 
      
Lee is a member of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and American College of Surgeons.
      
With more than 600 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1630Mon, 14 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Pathologist Joins OU PhysiciansPathologist Chris Williams, M.D., has established his practice with OU Physicians. He is also a clinical instructor of pathology with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. 
      
Williams completed a pathology residency and served as chief resident at the OU College of Medicine, where he earned his medical degree. He earned a master's degree in electrical engineering and a bachelor's degree from Oklahoma State University, Stillwater. 
   
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1628Tue, 08 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Board-certified Pediatrician Joins PracticePediatrician Tina M. Belt, M.D., has established her practice with OU Children's Physicians. 
      
Belt is board certified in pediatrics. She completed a pediatric residency and served as chief resident at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. She earned her medical degree from Baylor College of Medicine, Houston.
      
Belt sees patients in the OU Children's Physicians building, 1200 Children's Ave. For appointments, call (405) 271-6827.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
More than 175 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1627Tue, 08 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Neuroradiologist Joins OU PhysiciansNeuroradiologist Benjamin Cornwell, D.O., has established his medical practice at OU Physicians. Neuroradiologists specialize in the diagnosis of abnormalities of the central and peripheral nervous system, spine, and head and neck.
      
Cornwell is board certified in radiology. He completed a neuroradiology fellowship at the Cleveland Clinic, Ohio. He completed a diagnostic radiology residency at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and an internship at OU College of Medicine in Tulsa. He earned his doctor of osteopathic medicine degree from the Oklahoma State University College for Osteopathic Medicine, Tulsa. He earned his undergraduate degree from OU in Norman. 
      
Cornwell is a member of the Radiologic Society of North America
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1626Tue, 08 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMT
OU College of Pharmacy Receives National Award for Community ServiceThe University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy has been honored nationally for its work to address unmet community needs.

The college is the recipient of the Lawrence C. Weaver Transformative Community Service Award from the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. The award highlights community service as an important element of the academic mission and recognizes institutions that serve as an example of social responsiveness on the part of the academic health professions community.

"This is a tremendous honor and represents a steadfast commitment on the part of our faculty, student and staff to serve our community. For us, community service is a core belief," said College of Pharmacy Dean JoLaine R. Draugalis, R.Ph., Ph.D., FAPhA, FASHP.

The Association noted that the OU College of Pharmacy has demonstrated a deep and consistent commitment to community service through programs like an interprofessional, student-based clinic focused on providing care in underserved areas of Tulsa and rural northeast Oklahoma. The clinic features a minimum of three physicians, four medical students, a pharmacist, two student pharmacists, two nursing students and a nursing faculty member.

The college also implemented a clinical pharmacy services program in partnership with Variety Care with a goal of improving the health of individuals without access to health care.  This mirrored a similar program begun by the college in 1998, the Pharmacotherapy Service at the OU Family Medicine Center.

"Our faculty, student and staff look for avenues to live out our identity as 'a prescription for excellence.' Excellence doesn't just happen. It can only flourish in an environment of creativity and the OU College of Pharmacy is committed to both service and creativity," Draugalis said.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1625Tue, 08 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine Specialist Joins OU PhysiciansEva Sawheny, M.D., a fellowship-trained specialist, has established her practice with OU Physicians. She is also an assistant professor with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. 
      
Sawheny has a special interest in pulmonary oncology and sleep medicine. She is board certified in critical care medicine, pulmonary diseases and internal medicine. She completed fellowships in sleep medicine and pulmonary critical care medicine at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, Oklahoma City. She completed her residency and served as chief resident at the OU College of Medicine, Tulsa. She earned her medical degree in Debrecen, Hungary.
      
For an appointment with an OU Physicians sleep medicine/pulmonary medicine specialist, call (405) 271-7001.      
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state’s largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Enid and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region’s future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1623Mon, 30 Jun 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Healthy Eating Made Fun at OU Summer CampChips and cookies versus fruits and veggies  ̶  it's a decision dilemma kids face every day; and far too often, it is the chips and cookies that win out. The C.H.A.M.P. camp at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center aims to change that.   
 
C.H.A.M.P. stands for Children's Healthy Activity and Meal Planning. The annual summer camp hosted by Department of Nutritional Sciences at the OU College of Allied Health teaches 5th, 6th and 7th graders from the community about the importance of making healthy choices, food safety and kitchen skills. 
 
"Our goal is for the kids to walk away knowing that cooking healthy is easy and you can do it with the common ingredients found in most homes," said Brian dela Cruz, M.S., R.D./L.D., instructor and clinical coordinator for the Department of Nutritional Sciences.
 
Camp coaches, who are master's program students and interns training to be registered dietitians at the college, design a variety of activities. 

"The whole reason I wanted to become a dietitian was to help families learn to make healthier food choices and be able to pass those on to their loved ones," said C.H.A.M.P. coach Heidi Steenberger, who is training to become a dietitian. 

At the camp, participants learn about a variety of health and nutrition topics  ̶  everything from proper food etiquette to basic nutrition to the importance of exercise. 

"This year, we included lessons on packing healthy lunches, choosing healthy items from restaurant menus, and we even took them to the Braum's Family farm so they could see how milk was produced," Cruz said. "We also do a physical activity every morning and afternoon to encourage exercise for the kids."

The menu for the camp itself includes healthy lunches, which the kids help prepare, as well as healthy snacks.  

"We show them that it is just as easy to cut up fruit as it is to grab a bag of chips," Cruz said.

The hope is that by giving the kids a chance to engage in a week filled with a variety of health-focused activities, they will be more likely to maintain a healthy diet afterward and possibly even pass their newfound knowledge on to their family and friends.

"I learned what foods were healthy and which were not," said 11-year-old MacKynzie Smith. "It will probably change the way I choose my foods and eat from now on." 

"The food is always delicious and we have a blast making it," said camper Sydney Hester, 12. "I can't wait to use what I have learned at home!"
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1620Fri, 27 Jun 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Telemedicine Aids Early Detection of Eye Disease in Premature InfantsA new study shows telemedicine provides an effective strategy to screen babies born prematurely for a potentially blinding disease.

Researchers at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and 13 other sites nationwide participated in the study funded by the National Eye Institute, a part of the National Institutes of Health. 

"Babies born prematurely face many health risks, and one of those is the risk of retinopathy of prematurity or ROP, a debilitating eye disease that can rob a baby of vision," said R. Michael Siatkowski, M.D., professor of pediatric ophthalmology at the OU Health Sciences Center, who cares for his young patients at The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center and the Dean McGee Eye Institute in Oklahoma City. Siatkowski and fellow ophthalmologist Lloyd Hildebrand, who directed the study's information technology arm, led the research effort at OU.

"Telemedicine was shown in this study to provide us a new way to help even more babies, potentially easing the strain on hospitals with limited access to ophthalmologists like those in rural areas of Oklahoma, other parts of the nation and undeveloped countries worldwide", he said.

The telemedicine approach involved training nurses in neonatal intensive care units to use a special portable camera, called a Ret-Cam, to take pictures of babies' eyes. Those images were uploaded and sent to a distant image reading center for evaluation.  Staff members at the image reading center, who were trained to recognize signs of severe retinopathy of prematurity, identified when infants should be referred to an ophthalmologist for evaluation and potential treatment. Their evaluations were compared to those of ophthalmologists. In the study, image readers correctly identified 90 percent of infants needing evaluation. 

"They identified the infants at risk for progression to severe vision loss, and they did that very accurately," said Hildebrand.

He added the individuals trained to evaluate images sent to the image reading center did not have a medical background. They were individuals selected based upon their skill at looking at something objectively and following a specific protocol.

In addition to properly identifying infants needing evaluation, 43 percent of severe cases were identified by telemedicine an average of 15 days earlier than by ophthalmic exam. Researchers said this is important because if not detected and treated within a few days, severe ROP can lead to blindness. 

In ROP, blood vessels in the tissue in the back of the eye called the retina begin to grow abnormally, which can lead to scarring and detachment of the retina. Some degree of ROP appears in more than half of all infants born at 30 weeks of pregnancy or younger.  (A full term pregnancy is 40 weeks.) However, only 5 to 8 percent of cases become severe enough to require treatment.

Treatment usually involves either laser surgery to the developing retina or injection of a special medication into the eyeball.  

"Early diagnosis and prompt treatment remains the best way to prevent vision loss in infants with ROP," said Siatkowski. 

The American Academy of Ophthalmology recommends routine screening for all babies born at gestational age 30 weeks or younger or who weigh less than 3.3 pounds at birth.

Researchers said telemedicine could save babies and their families the hardship and hazards of being unnecessarily transferred to larger facilities with greater resources and more on-site ophthalmologists.

"Research like this is very important to advance medicine, enhance the quality of care and reduce the cost of care," Siatkowski said. "The cost to society of a blind infant is about $1 million over his or her lifetime."

The cost of establishing a telemedicine ROP screening program includes acquisition of a special camera for taking pictures of the retina, training NICU personnel to take and transmit quality photos, and establishment and maintenance of an image reading center. Researchers believe advances in imaging and grading of images may help streamline the process even more.

"ROP is a leading cause of blindness in children, so this work addresses a major problem that is growing globally and it addresses it by standardizing care. When we standardize care, quality goes up," Hildebrand said.

The study is reported in JAMA Ophthalmology. It was funded by grants from the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health.  The technical framework and software utilized for the study was created by Inoveon Corporation in Oklahoma City. 
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1619Thu, 26 Jun 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Certified Nurse Midwife Joins OU Physicians Jessica Kayser, A.P.R.N., W.H.N.P-B.C., C.N.M., has established her practice with OU Physicians. Certified nurse midwives are advanced practice registered nurses who have received extensive academic and clinical training to manage and care for women during low-risk pregnancies and births. Midwives also offer general women's health services.
     
Kayser is a certified nurse midwife. She is also a certified women's health nurse practitioner. She earned a master's degree in nursing from the Georgetown University Certified Nurse Midwife and Women's Health Nurse Practitioner program, Washington, D.C. She earned her bachelor's degree in nursing from the University of Oklahoma College of Nursing and an additional bachelor's degree from OU in Norman.
      
OU Physicians certified nurse midwives see patients in the OU Physicians Building, 825 N.E. 10th St., and deliver babies in the Women's and Newborn Pavilion at The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. For an appointment with a nurse midwife, call (405) 271-9494.     
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1618Wed, 25 Jun 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Pediatric Emergency Medicine Physician Joins OU Children's PhysiciansSarah Shelton, M.D., a pediatric emergency medicine physician, has established her practice with OU Children's Physicians. She sees patients at The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. 
      
Shelton is board certified in pediatrics and board eligible in pediatric emergency medicine. She completed a fellowship in pediatric emergency medicine at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, Oklahoma City. She completed her residency and earned her medical degree from the OU College of Medicine, Tulsa. She earned her undergraduate degree at Oklahoma Baptist University, Shawnee.
      
She is a member of the American College of Emergency Physicians and American Academy of Pediatrics.
     
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
More than 175 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1617Wed, 25 Jun 2014 00:00:00 GMT
E-Cigarettes Pose Potentially Deadly DangerThey're supposedly a safer alternative to conventional cigarettes, but electronic cigarettes may actually pose a serious and even deadly danger to others in your home — particularly children.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports e-cigarettes as currently sold are a threat to small children and emergency room physicians at The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center as well as experts at the Oklahoma Poison Control Center agree.

"The main concern that we have relates to the risk associated with nicotine in the liquid in e-cigarettes," said Dr. Ryan Brown, Children's Hospital emergency room physician. "Liquid nicotine is toxic and potentially fatal, especially in small children. The liquid contains very high concentrations of nicotine. In fact one 15 milliliter container – that's about 3 teaspoons of liquid - at a concentration of 18 milligrams per milliliter contains enough nicotine to kill three grown men."

Pediatricians and poison control experts warn that e-cigarettes are particularly attractive to kids because they come in a variety of flavors, including candy and fruit flavors.

Brown said without proper precautions a child might easily ingest a potentially fatal amount of the liquid. In addition, the nicotine in the liquid can be absorbed through the skin and the lining of the mouth or through the eyes. Inhalation is another method of accidental exposure in children.

"It can cause nausea and vomiting, cardiac arrhythmias and seizures," Brown said.

Here are some other important facts to consider from The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center, the Oklahoma Poison Control Center and the CDC:
• The number of e-cigarette exposure phone calls to U.S. poison control centers increased from just one call a month on average in 2010 to over 200 calls per month in early 2014.
More than half (51.1 percent) involved children younger than 5 years of age.

• Accidental poisonings related to e-cigarettes are on the rise.
o In the first 5 and half months of 2014, the Oklahoma Poison Control Center has already received 54 calls related to e-cigarette exposure, compared to 77 in all of 2013.
o The number of calls in 2013 represented a 600 percent increase over 2012.

"Just since the beginning of the year, we have had a huge increase in calls to the Oklahoma Poison Control Center and two-thirds of those had to come straight to the ER for evaluation and treatment," Brown said.

To date, the CDC reports only one death related to e-cigarette exposure. It involved a woman who injected the liquid. But Brown and his colleagues know the potential for accidental deaths in both children and adults is very real.

"It's almost not a question of ‘if' we will see a death, but, I hate to say it, ‘when' we will see one, Brown said.

Just as with any other poisonous chemical in the house, experts urge parents and caregivers to take extra precautions to ensure that e-cigarettes and the liquid used to fill them are kept out of reach of children.

Developing strategies to monitor and prevent future poisonings is also critical given the rapid increase in e-cigarette exposures, according to the CDC.

If you suspect a child has been exposed to an e-cigarette device or liquid nicotine, immediately call your local poison center at:
1-800-222-1222
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1616Tue, 24 Jun 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Celebrating the "Spirit" of Children's HealthAn array of kites took center stage as a new exterior art feature was dedicated at the Children's Atrium at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City.

Patients, parents, medical staff as well as campus and community leaders were on hand to dedicate the new artwork "Spirit" by Matthew Placzek. The artwork features bronze statues and a series of brightly-colored kites that are illuminated at night. It stands as a warm welcome for the countless children who receive their care at The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center and OU Children's Physicians outpatient clinics.

"The new artwork you see behind me caps a series of impressive projects over the past decade - all aimed at elevating children's health care in Oklahoma to another level of excellence," said Dean Gandy, chief executive officer of the University Hospitals Authority and Trust at the dedication event. He also acknowledged the important role of the art committee in the art selection process.

"This committee included campus, civic and community leaders. Together, they oversaw a selection process that began with submissions from many talented artists worldwide.   The committee helped shape the vision, and was instrumental in the selection of the art," Gandy said.

Pediatric patients from Children's were on hand to present members of the committee with special awards in gratitude for their efforts.

Children from the hospital and clinics also were treated to kites, refreshments and a chance to have their photo taken with Chipper, the hospital's friendly, feathered mascot.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1613Fri, 13 Jun 2014 00:00:00 GMT
National Lipid Association Names Oklahoma City Physician as TreasurerThe National Lipid Association has named Robert A. Wild, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., F.N.L.A., treasurer. The announcement was made at the Association's Annual Scientific Sessions held May 1–4 in Orlando, Fla.

Wild is an obstetrician-gynecologist with OU Physicians and a professor with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. He is board certified in OB-Gyn, reproductive endocrinology and clinical lipidology.

The Association is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary medical society representing more than 3,000 members in the U.S. The Association provides continuing medical education for physicians and other health care professionals who practice in the field of clinical lipidology – the study of lipids. Lipids are a group of naturally occurring molecules that include fats and waxes.

With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 

OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1607Tue, 03 Jun 2014 00:00:00 GMT
New Technology Introduces Miniaturized Pacemaker to Heart CareImagine a pacemaker the size of a large vitamin. It's not the stuff of imagination anymore. In fact, OU Medical Center implanted the world's smallest, minimally invasive pacemaker in a 65-year-old Oklahoma man's heart as part of a worldwide clinical trial.
 
It marks only the third such device implanted in the United States.
 
"Mostly, I was just feeling like I had no energy and had a hard time breathing. Then I was having episodes where I was blacking out," said Ray Haggard of his condition prior to receiving the pacemaker.
 
Haggard was diagnosed with an arrhythmia and told he would need a pacemaker. His doctors at OU Medicine told him about a new option – a smaller, wireless pacemaker that could be placed without an incision in the chest. Haggard decided it was the best option for him.
 
One-tenth the size of a conventional pacemaker, the Medtronic Micra™ Transcatheter Pacing System is encapsulated in a single unit that goes directly into the heart. It is placed through the femoral vein in the groin, similar to catheterization procedures to implant stents, and implanted inside the right ventricle of the heart.
 
In contrast to current pacemaker implant procedures, the Micra does not require a surgical incision in the chest and the creation of a "pocket" under the skin. It is cosmetically invisible to the patient after implantation.
 
The Micra uses small tines to attach to the heart. There are no wires called "leads" to connect to the heart. There also is no external power source to be implanted.
 
"We believe this study will prove that this pacemaker significantly reduces the risk of complications that are related to having the larger pacemaker in a pocket under the skin. We also believe the risk of the actual implant will be less because there is less of a risk of perforating things that we don't want to perforate, including the heart," said Dr. Dwight Reynolds, the OU Physicians cardiologist who implanted the device. Reynolds also is chief of the Cardiovascular Section of the Department of Medicine at the OU Health Sciences Center.  
 
Millions of people worldwide have pacemakers. They are typically used in patients who have arrhythmias, which are problems with the rate or rhythm of the heartbeat.  
The Micra is designed to respond to a patient's activity level and adjust therapy automatically.
Medtronic said the battery in the Micra is expected to last for about 10 years.  
 
"I think this pacemaker gives us another mode of treatment that may suit some patients particularly well. It truly expands our capabilities to provide pacing therapy for the heart," Reynolds said.
 
He stressed the Micra is not for everyone though.
"It's not a defibrillator. It only paces one chamber of the heart with this first generation."  

Haggard had the pacemaker placed one day, stayed overnight at OU Medical Center for observation and was back home the next and quickly back to his everyday activities.
 
"I was able to get back to life pretty quickly and to doing what I would normally do," he said.
 
OU Medical Center is one of only 25 sites in the United States and 50 globally selected to participate in the clinical trial. The study will enroll up to 780 patients worldwide.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1603Thu, 29 May 2014 00:00:00 GMT
OU Research Points Way to Better Care for Asthma PatientsNew research at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center reveals how changes in primary care practices can lead to improved care for asthma patients. 
 
One in twelve people, about eight percent of the United States population, has asthma. It claims thousands of lives each year and costs this country tens of billions of dollars a year in medical expenses, missed school and work, and premature deaths. 
 
Primary care providers play a critical role in helping ensure patients' asthma is well controlled. To that end, the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute issued clinical practice guidelines for managing asthma. Though the guidelines have been out for more than 20 years, implementation in primary care has proven difficult, said James Mold, M.D., principal investigator and director of the Research Division in the OU College of Medicine's Department of Family and Preventive Medicine.
 
So Mold and his colleagues set out to determine which methods best aid primary care practices in the implementation of these guidelines.  
 
"From previous studies we know that performance feedback and academic feedback work to help ensure clinical practice guidelines are implemented, but we wanted to see if we could amplify that effect by combining these tools with practice facilitation, local learning collaboratives or both," said Mold.
 
Practice facilitation provides intensive onsite support to help practices redesign clinical processes and improve clinical outcomes for patients. The model depends upon trusting relationships that develop between practice staff and facilitators in a model similar to the Cooperative Extension where agents develop relationships with farmers to facilitate implantation of evidence-based farming practices.
 
Learning collaboratives create opportunities for improvement within a framework of completion and urgency. They typically involve large numbers of practices that receive education, and also perform medical record reviews, develop registries and work collaboratively to implement evidence-based strategies.    

"In this respect, the trial introduced a slight modification when it came to learning collaboratives. We used smaller groups of practices called local learning collaboratives, which involve a smaller number of practices meeting more often for shorter periods of time," Mold said. 

Mold, along with clinician members of the Oklahoma Physicians Resource/Research Network and researchers and clinicians from two other practice-based research networks in New York, conducted the study. It involved 43 practices and 1,016 patients. Medical records of patients with asthma seen during pre- and post-intervention periods were used to determine adherence to six of the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute's asthma guideline recommendations.
 
In the six-month study, all practices received performance feedback, academic detailing, summaries of Institute's asthma guidelines and a toolkit, which included the Asthma Control Test, the Asthma APGAR ( a set of specific assessment tools for asthma) and action plan templates in English and Spanish.  In addition, each was randomly assigned to one of four study arms. These included:

1-      Practice facilitation
2-      Local learning collaboratives
3-      Practice facilitation and  local learning collaboratives
4-      Control
 
Practice facilitation involved assistance from a practice facilitator who visited for a half-day weekly or a full day every other week.

Practices assigned to one of the local learning collaborative arms were expected to meet in groups of three practices once a month for at least an hour to review each other's performance data, discuss successful and unsuccessful strategies, and refine plans for implementing guideline recommendations.

Researchers found overall adherence to all six National Heart Lung and Blood Institute recommendations increased in all arms. Practices in the control arm improved adherence in two of six recommendations; those in the practice facilitation arm improved adherence in three; practices in the local learning collaboratives improved in four; but those in the combined practice facilitation/local learning collaborative arm saw the greatest change, improving in five of six recommendations.

However, the study found that only practice facilitation was associated with improvements more substantial than controls in two of the guideline recommendations — assessments of asthma severity and level of control.

Though the benefits of practice facilitation were clear, researchers note this form of intervention can be costly. 

"We estimated the cost of the six-month practice facilitation intervention, including performance assessments, academic detailing, and supervision, to be between $7,500 and $15,000 per practice," Mold said, adding that by implementing a statewide model that utilized facilitators through an extension system costs could be reduced substantially.  
 
The research appears this month in the Annals of Family Medicine.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1599Fri, 16 May 2014 00:00:00 GMT
National Cancer Institute Recognizes Stephenson Cancer Center with Lead Academic Site Status in National Clinical Trials NetworkOklahomans will have access to the newest cutting-edge therapies, thanks to the Stephenson Cancer Center's designation as a Lead Academic Site by the National Cancer Institute in its new National Clinical Trials Network.

Lead Academic Sites form the centerpiece of the National Cancer Institute's new strategy to conduct high-impact clinical trials and deliver new therapies to cancer patients. The Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center is one of only 30 Lead Academic Sites nationwide to be selected as a primary location for conducting this high-impact clinical research.  

Lead Academic Site designation is awarded through a federal research grant that will bring over $6 million in funding to Oklahoma over the next five years. This designation establishes the Stephenson as a national center of excellence in conducting innovative clinical trials research.

"This new grant is a recognition that the Stephenson Cancer Center is taking its place among the leading cancer centers in the nation," said OU President David L. Boren.

The Stephenson Cancer Center was selected as a Lead Academic Site through a highly competitive process evaluating the Stephenson's scientific contributions at a national level along with its ability to conduct high-quality clinical trials research. Robert Mannel, MD, Stephenson Cancer Center director, serves as principal investigator for the grant. Scott McMeekin, MD, Deputy Director for Clinical Research, serves as the grant's co-principal investigator.  
 
"Lead Academic Site designation in the National Clinical Trials Network ensures that all Oklahomans will have access to the latest drugs being developed by the National Cancer Institute to battle cancer," stated Mannel. "It means that the Stephenson will be at the table in the National Cancer Institute's effort to develop precision medicines based on genetic mutations unique to each person and that target tumors at a molecular level. 

"This designation is ultimately due to the Stephenson Cancer Center's dedicated physicians and staff, who are committed to raising the standard of care through research and education, and to cancer patients in Oklahoma, who choose to participate in clinical trials and, in so doing, help not only themselves but all who fight cancer," Mannel said.

Key collaborators in this effort include the State of Oklahoma, which established the Stephenson Cancer Center in 2001, and the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, which provides major support for innovative cancer research being conducted at the Stephenson. Others include Oklahoma's philanthropic and corporate communities, who have generously supported research at the Stephenson Cancer Center.
 
About the Stephenson Cancer Center
The Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center is the state's only comprehensive academic cancer center. The Stephenson Cancer Center houses more than 50 oncology physicians who specialize in the treatment of all types of cancer and who provide patient-centered care to Oklahomans. In association with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is working to decrease the burden of cancer in Oklahoma by supporting innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research across the state. The Stephenson Cancer Center has more than 160 research members who are conducting over 100 cancer research projects. This research is supported by more than $25 million in annual funding from the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society and other sponsors.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1592Thu, 01 May 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Genetic Cause of Rare Condition Uncovered by Oklahoma ResearchersIt is a condition so rare that it has been diagnosed in only a handful of families and individuals worldwide. Now, researchers at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation have discovered that a mutation in a single gene is responsible for Stormorken syndrome as well as how that mutation causes the condition

The groundbreaking work appears in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. It all started about a year ago when OU Children's Physicians' pediatric hematologist-oncologist William Meyer, M.D., referred Isabel, a 10-year-old Oklahoma girl, to his colleague Klaas Wierenga, M.D., a medical geneticist with OU Children's Physicians.

"When she was just a baby, she would bleed spontaneously from the mouth. She didn't act sick, but she would bruise so easily. She as a beautiful little baby, but we didn't understand what was going on," said Linda Hammond, Isabel's grandmother.

"Until our case, there were only six reported families with this syndrome," Wierenga said. "The syndrome is diagnosed if the patient meets three criteria. The first is a muscle disorder, typically weakness in the proximal muscles. The thigh muscles are usually the weakest. The second is a bleeding disorder, for which she was seeing Meyer, and the third is congenital miosis, which means the eyes are always pinpointed, unable to dilate in a dark room."

The condition is inherited in a dominant manner, which means it is passed on from a parent to half of his or her children. Interestingly, though, Wierenga quickly discovered that, unlike other families with this condition, Isabel's parents did not have Stormorken syndrome. That meant it was not inherited, but instead, the result of a spontaneous mutation at conception.

"That's when a geneticist's heart starts beating faster, because we think this might be something we can more easily solve," he said.
Wierenga partnered with Patrick Gaffney, M.D., at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation to begin trying to pinpoint the exact genetic cause. Gaffney, staff scientist Graham Wiley, Ph.D., and the team set to work trying to solve the genetic underpinnings of the condition.

They utilized a process called exome sequencing. It provides a more efficient, yet still effective, alternative to whole genome sequencing. Exome sequencing looks at the exons or snippets of genes that code for proteins. In the human genome, there are about 180,000 exons.

Comparing genetic samples of the patient with Stormorken syndrome to that of her unaffected relatives through exome sequencing, researchers hit upon three possible genetic targets initially. Next, they compared the Oklahoma patient to another with the same syndrome from Switzerland. This time, they uncovered a single mutation present in both, in the gene named STIM1.

"This is significant because the genetic cause of the syndrome was previously unknown. Now, we know what the gene is and what the mutation is," Gaffney said.

STIM1 is part of the cellular machinery that controls calcium inflow in the cells of the body. The next step for researchers was to determine exactly how the newly discovered mutation triggered changes in the body that cause the syndrome. For those answers, researchers turned to another Oklahoma colleague, Leonidas Tsiokas, Ph.D., researcher and professor of cell biology at the OU College of Medicine.

Tsiokas, post-doctoral scholar Vasyl Nesin, Ph.D., and their team set to work. They focused on how ionized calcium enters the cell in unaffected individuals and in patients with Stormorken syndrome. Calcium inflow was measured as a tiny electrical current.

The team learned the STIM1 mutation works much like a faulty electrical switch that gets stuck in the "on" position. Normally, when calcium levels in the cell drop, STIM1 activates calcium entry into the cell from the outside. When sufficient calcium has entered, STIM1 closes the channel. With the mutation, however, the channel opens and stays open. So the calcium keeps flowing.

"The calcium activates the platelets in the blood and keeps activating them. Eventually, the platelets are exhausted and destroyed," Tsiokas said.

With the help of colleagues at Duke University, the OU team tested their findings in a zebra-fish model. Again, the single mutation in STIM1 caused the same over-function of the "calcium switch" and destroyed platelets. That confirmed the mutation as the cause of the bleeding problems found with Stormorken syndrome.

The team believes it is the same errant signaling that causes the other hallmark symptoms of Stormorken syndrome – proximal muscle weakness and miosis. In fact, the finding may hold promise for a better understanding of more common conditions too.

"Stormorken syndrome is extremely rare, but the pathologies of the syndrome are not rare," Tsiokas said. "Too much calcium in the cell may also play a role in dyslexia, muscle defects and asplenia (the absence of normal spleen function)."

Because STIM1 is important for regulating free calcium levels in the cells of the body, researchers believe it is probable that, in fact, every cell in the body suffers when the gene is over activated. However, the damage is more apparent in tissues most sensitive to calcium channel over stimulation, including the pupils, platelets and muscles.

"We hope this research puts new attention into this aspect of calcium channel activation, which may be more common that we currently suspect," Wierenga said. "If there were a drug that targeted this over-activation, this would be a rational form of therapy. Of course, we don't know of such a drug; but until recently, we did not even know the cause of this syndrome."

Researchers say the research discovery highlights the importance of collaboration and the benefits gained through the advancement of the science of modern medicine.

"New advances in genetic sequencing provide an unprecedented opportunity to understand the genetic basis of poorly understood genetic disorders," Gaffney said. "We hope that this will eventually lead to new therapies for treating rare diseases and add to our understanding of gene/protein function, stimulating further breakthroughs down the road."
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1577Fri, 18 Apr 2014 00:00:00 GMT
OU Research Finds Estrogen Suppression Helps Block Colorectal CancerResearchers at the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma for the first time have shown a drug commonly used for infertility also effectively inhibits colorectal cancer. The findings point to potential new preventive and treatment therapies for those at highest risk.

The research is prominently displayed on the front cover of the latest issue of the Cancer Prevention Research Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

"It is really a great honor for me to have my work featured on the cover of this prestigious publication," said Cancer Center researcher Naveena Janakiram, Ph.D., who also holds a faculty position within the department of Internal Medicine at the OU Health Sciences Center.

More than 1.2 million people are diagnosed with colon cancer, and 600,000 die every year worldwide. Colon cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer death, after lung, liver and stomach cancer.

Janakiram and her team focused on how to mitigate the role high estrogen levels play in colorectal cancers.

"We know that estrogen is having a pivotal role in colorectal cancer," she said. "Women with high levels of estrogen have a 60 percent higher risk of colon cancer."

Women with high levels of estrogen are at increased risk for colorectal cancer because higher estrogen levels suppress the body's tumor-killing response during the formation of colon tumors.

When the body detects cancer cells, Janakiram explained it normally responds by dispatching its own army of cancer fighters known as natural killer cells.

"The more natural killer cells, the better the patient's prognosis," she said.

However, when high estrogen levels are present, the body's natural killer cells are essentially blocked. The OU team set out to determine if they could counteract the effects of high estrogen levels.

Janakiram and her team found the drugs effectively suppressed the tumor-forming effects of estrogen by increasing the presence of the natural killer cells.

In addition, the drugs also appear to suppress various other tumor-promoting genes and increase the body's innate immune response against tumors.

The findings may help advance the treatment and prevention of colorectal cancer in humans, especially for those at highest risk. Fellow researchers believe the findings are interesting and significant as they work to advance the fight against colorectal cancer.

"These laboratory studies reveal how high estrogen levels impact the immune system, suppressing the natural killer cells and allowing tumor-initiating cells, much like stem cells, to grow into tumors in the colon. The work also reveals how these two drugs, which suppress the negative effects of high estrogen, potentially may have a positive impact on tumor treatment and prevention," said C. V. Rao, Ph.D., director of the Center for Cancer Prevention and Drug Development at the OU Health Sciences Center.

The research also garnered significant attention as thousands of cancer researchers and specialists from around the world gathered this month for the annual conference of the American Association for Cancer Research in San Diego.

Janakiram's research was supported by a COBRE grant from the National Institutes of Health (1P20GM103639-01).
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1571Wed, 16 Apr 2014 00:00:00 GMT
New Multimillion-dollar Heart, Vascular and Electrophysiology Facility Brings Life-Saving Care to OklahomansTime and treatment are critical when a person is having a heart attack or serious cardiovascular issue, and a new $20 million state-of-the-art cardiac catheterization and electrophysiology (EP) laboratory at OU Medical Center well help provide even more life-saving diagnoses and treatments for Oklahomans needing urgent cardiac and vascular care.
 
The 20,000-square-foot cardiac catheterization/EP laboratory has five rooms and state-of the-art technology, providing faster and more efficient treatments to unclog blocked arteries during a heart attack. Innovative hybrid technology also allows OU Medicine experts to treat a wide range of cardiovascular and electrophysiology needs—This includes serious heart arrhythmias (irregular heartbeats), blood vessel problems and issues requiring devices such as pacemakers and implantable defibrillators.
 
OU Medical System CEO Chuck Spicer said the lab's design and the collaborative involvement between cardiology and electrophysiology services will enhance quality of care for patients.
 
"It's about bringing cardiology, vascular and heart-rhythm services as well as their surgical associates together to provide the finest, safest and most effective environment to save lives—It's what patients expect from OU Medicine," Spicer said.
 
The lab has several suites, including three cutting-edge hybrid operating rooms designed to accommodate a variety of procedures performed by six medical specialties.
 
"The hybrid suites allow us incredible flexibility to perform the simplest of procedures to open heart surgery—all in one place. This means the patient won't have to be moved—allowing safer and quicker access to care," said Dwight Reynolds, M.D., chief of cardiovascular services at the University of Oklahoma.

Advanced equipment in the lab will keep patients and staff safer with imaging systems designed to deliver the lowest doses of X-rays of any machine on the market, while at the same time delivering superb, crystal-clear details.  

M. Dewayne Andrews, M.D., senior vice president and provost executive dean of the OU College of Medicine, said the lab is yet another example of OU Medicine's commitment to advancing health care.  
 
"The creation and opening of this advanced care center is another demonstration of the commitment of OU Medicine and its partners to becoming the premier destination for health care in Oklahoma and this region," he said. "This enhances opportunities to bring discoveries of new treatments to the patients we serve."

The lab is one component of the new OU Medicine Cardiovascular Institute, which will bring together services found across the OU Medicine entities. The institute includes an enhanced heart-lung vascular clinic, a fully accredited echo and vascular lab, a dedicated cardiovascular inpatient specialty unit and an electrocardiogram (EKG) unit.
 
From conception to completion, the Cardiovascular Institute and the cardiac catheterization/EP laboratory have been more than a decade in the making. The lab will open its doors to patients later this month.
 
For more information, please visit oumedicine.com/cath.
 
For a video of the lab: https://www.dropbox.com/s/7oduu60ouaq3lty/New_Tech_Broll-YouTube%20sharing.mov
 

OU MEDICAL CENTER
OU Medical Center, including The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center, is Oklahoma's largest and most comprehensive hospital. It is located in the heart of Oklahoma City. We provide a full range of hospital services for every patient, from the smallest neonate to the most critically ill senior.
 
OU MEDICINE
OU Medicine is the collective brand for OU Medical Center, OU Physicians and the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. Headquartered at the Oklahoma Health Center campus near downtown Oklahoma City, OU Medicine is the state's largest academic medical complex. Among other things, it provides health care, conducts medical research and educates the physicians of tomorrow. 
 
OU Medical Center is home to the state's only level one trauma center and The Children's Hospital, Oklahoma's most comprehensive pediatric facility. Members of OU Physicians, the state's largest physicians group, provide care at the hospital facilities and at OU Physicians clinics in Oklahoma City and across the state. The practice includes almost every adult and child specialty, and some of its physicians have pioneered treatments or procedures that are world-firsts.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1562Mon, 14 Apr 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Pathologist Joins OU PhysiciansPathologist Cindy L. Davis, M.D., has established her practice with OU Physicians. She is also an assistant professor of pathology and clinical assistant professor of dermatology with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. 
   
Davis is board certified in anatomic and clinical pathology, as well as dermatopathology. She completed fellowships in breast pathology at the University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, and in dermatopathology at the University of Chicago. She completed a residency and served as chief resident at the University of Florida College of Medicine and earned her medical degree at the University of Miami School of Medicine.
      
Davis is a member of the American Society for Clinical Pathology and the College of American Pathologists.
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1557Tue, 08 Apr 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Psychologist Joins OU Children's PhysiciansAngelica R. Eddington, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist, has established her practice with OU Children's Physicians. She has also been named an assistant professor with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.
      
Eddington's practice focuses on working with pediatric nephrology and organ transplant patients. She completed a fellowship in pediatric psychology at the OU College of Medicine and earned her doctorate at Oklahoma State University. She completed an internship in psychology at the University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Memphis, and earned her master's degree at OSU.
      
She is a member of the Oklahoma Psychological Association.
      
Eddington sees patients in the OU Children's Physicians building, 1200 Children's Ave. For appointments, call (405) 271-6827.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
More than 175 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1556Tue, 08 Apr 2014 00:00:00 GMT
OU College of Medicine Announces Psychiatry ChairBritta Ostermeyer, M.D., M.B.A., F.A.P.A., has been named professor and chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. She also holds the Paul and Ruth Jonas Chair in Psychiatry and has established a practice with OU Physicians. 
      
Psychiatrists are medical doctors specifically trained in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mental, emotional and behavioral disorders. Ostermeyer is board certified in general and forensic psychiatry. She specializes in diagnosing and treating patients with anxiety and depression disorders as well as other psychiatric disorders. 
      
Ostermeyer comes to OU from Ben Taub General Hospital/Harris Health System and Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, where she was chief of service and held several director positions in psychiatry. While in Houston, she was also an associate professor of family and community medicine for the Department of Family and Community Medicine and associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Baylor College of Medicine.
      
Ostermeyer completed a fellowship in psychiatry and the law (forensic psychiatry) at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio. She completed a residency in psychiatry at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and the New York State Psychiatric State Institute, New York. She completed a fellowship and internship in neurology as well as additional medical studies at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston. She earned her medical degree from Hanover Medical School, Hanover, Germany. She earned a master of business administration, from the University of Tennessee Physician Executive Program, Knoxville. 
      
Ostermeyer is an active member of the American Psychiatric Association, American Academy of Psychiatry and The Law, Oklahoma Psychiatric Society and National Association of Public Hospitals and Health Systems.
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Enid and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1558Tue, 08 Apr 2014 00:00:00 GMT
OU Medicine Children's Experts Save Infant's LifeLooking at 2-month-old Levi Carter, it's hard to imagine he's already faced frightening, life-threatening struggles in his short life. While he's home and healthy and living like a typical baby now, his introduction to the world was fraught with drama his family won't soon forget.  

Levi is alive and well thanks to the expertise of OU Children's Physicians and their medical teams of experts at The Children's Hospital who cared for his congenital heart problem—even before he was born. If his medical condition had gone undiagnosed and he hadn't had open heart surgery after birth, Levi could have died.

Last fall, Levi's mother Whittney and his father Rory thought they were experiencing a typical pregnancy. An ultrasound changed that. Whittney's obstetrician-gynecologist suspected Levi had a heart problem called transposition of the great arteries, an often-fatal heart defect that deprives the blood of oxygen. 

"I said okay. Then I went home and really freaked out," Whittney Carter said.

Only five of every 10,000 babies in the U.S. are born with transposition of the great arteries. The condition occurs when the two main arteries of the heart are switched, or transposed. Blood that returns from the body typically goes to the lungs for oxygen. Because the two main connections are switched, blood goes back to the body without the oxygen it needs. 

Whittney's ob-gyn sent her to Children's high-risk pregnancy expert Dr. Marvin Williams, who confirmed the defect and sprung into action the highly specialized team at the OU Prenatal Diagnostic Center.

"In situations like this, it's imperative we follow these moms closely. She came to us at almost 37 weeks pregnant.  Most important was mobilizing the care—making certain the baby is stable—and mobilizing the subspecialties," Williams said.

The OU Prenatal Diagnostic Center is strategically located in the same building as the state's most comprehensive pediatric hospital—The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Expectant mothers have quick access to a wide variety of specialized services, including pediatric surgeons, cardiologists, urologists and neonatologists. 

"It's a true testament to how we took this potentially complex cardiac case and mobilized our care team, which included our pediatric cardiothoracic surgeon, pediatric cardiologists, our neonatal perinatal team, and a perinatal nurse navigator," Williams said.

It was an anxious time for the Carters. Well into Whittney's pregnancy, they had to entrust their baby's care to relative strangers. They quickly bonded with the team, which also is trained to counsel families like the Carters.

"I was a little scared of course—because it was a newborn having surgery—but I was confident going into it," Whittney Carter said.

Dr. Williams delivered Levi at full term on Jan. 27, 2014. Levi stayed in the Children's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit where he adjusted to his new world before undergoing open-heart surgery only three days later.

Once again, the Carters placed their trust in another physician:  a new surgeon to Children's who was heavily recruited from the famed Mayo Clinic.

As Levi's parents anxiously waited, pediatric cardiothoracic surgeon Dr. Harold Burkhart performed an arterial switch operation to repair Levi's heart. The procedure switched his arteries to their proper places; but in order to do that, Levi's heart had to be stopped while a heart-lung machine handled respiration and blood circulation.

"Dr. Burkhart was really honest. He told us how it was going to be," Whittney Carter said. "He was very caring and confident. He made us feel it was going to be OK." 

And it was. Even though transposition surgery is considered one of the more serious operations performed on newborns, Burkhart said Levi's surgery went off without a hitch.

"We've taken a blue baby and made it a pink baby with essentially a normal heart. That's gratifying," Burkhart said.

It wasn't long after the surgery that Levi was moved to Children's NICU Village, a unit where parents room-in with the baby to care for him before going home.   

"I was finally able to relax," Whittney Carter said.

On Feb. 12, 2014, Levi went home for the first time with his family. 

"It was surreal.  In two weeks all this happened and then we were able to come home with him on nothing but aspirin," Whittney said. 

THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL AT OU MEDICAL CENTER
The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center has 326 inpatient beds and is the only freestanding comprehensive children's hospital in Oklahoma. The Children's Hospital's pediatric staff  have years of specialized pediatric training with education, research and technology to treat conditions ranging from cardiothoracic and oncology-related illnesses to neonatal specialty care and pediatric solid-organ transplants. The Children's Hospital's 88-bed Neonatal Intensive Care Unit provides the highest level of neonatal care in Oklahoma. The Children's Hospital was one of the first hospitals in the country to provide total, comprehensive care for mothers and their newborns all in the same building. Additionally, the Women's & Newborn Center at The Children's Hospital provides family-centered newborn care for all types of deliveries—from routine to complicated, high-risk births—and offers the most comprehensive obstetrics program in the state. To find out more, visit www.oumedicine.com/childrens or www.facebook.com/okchildrens.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1551Fri, 04 Apr 2014 00:00:00 GMT
New Treatment Offers Radiation at Time of Breast Cancer SurgerySome patients with early stage breast cancer may now have the option of receiving both surgery and radiation treatment at the same time thanks to a new therapy offered by specialists at OU Medical Center and the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma.

The procedure is called intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). With IORT, specialists are able to use a balloon with an X-ray tube in the center of it, to deliver a concentrated dose of radiation therapy to the breast tissue immediately adjacent to the surgical bed, the area at highest risk for recurrence.  

"Once the tumor is surgically removed, a small inflatable balloon and miniature X-ray source are temporarily placed into the surgical cavity. Radiation treatment is then delivered in as little as eight minutes," said Ozer Algan, M.D. radiation oncologist with the Stephenson Cancer Center. "IORT at the time of surgery delivers a single, prescribed, targeted dose of radiation to the region of breast at highest risk of developing a local recurrence. The goal is to target and kill any potential remaining cancer cells while reducing the overall duration of radiation treatment for patients with early stage breast cancer."

IORT at the time of surgery provides a new option for some patients that helps eliminate the need for weeks of traditional, external beam radiation therapy. 

 "We are committed to providing our patients with breakthrough treatment options that improve care and promote quality of life," said William Dooley, M.D., breast surgeon with OU Medical Center and the OU Breast Institute. "With IORT at the time of surgery, the patient often  is able to avoid weeks of external beam radiation treatments. That means less travel, fewer missed days of work, less disruption to their daily lives and less anxiety for the patient."

In addition, IORT helps minimize radiation to healthy tissue and organs, such as the lungs or heart, while preserving more healthy tissue, like the skin, that could be damaged using other techniques.

"I think it is great for patients to have this opportunity because it keeps you from having to go back and forth for weeks of radiation following surgery," said Linda Skala, 61, of Oklahoma City. She recently received IORT at the time of her lumpectomy at OU Medical Center.

In addition to added convenience, IORT also offers other potential benefits for breast cancer patients. For example, breast cancer patients who undergo IORT with lumpectomy are potentially able to have another lumpectomy followed by radiation. This offers an additional option for patients who experience a recurrence, or if a new tumor develops in a different part of the breast.

To be eligible for IORT, the following criteria typically apply:
    •    Be a patient who would normally undergo a lumpectomy followed by radiation
    •    Be in the early stages of breast cancer
    •    Have a small tumor
    •    Be over the age of 50

"If you are a candidate for IORT, I highly recommend it," Skala said, adding that she enjoyed a short recovery time and had no side effects from the radiation treatment.   The IORT system currently in use at OU Medical Center is the Xoft® Axxent® Electronic Brachytherapy System®.

OU MEDICAL CENTER
OU Medical Center, including The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center is Oklahoma's largest and most comprehensive hospital.  It is located in the heart of Oklahoma City. We provide a full range of hospital services for every patient, from the smallest neonate to the most critically ill senior.

PEGGY AND CHARLES STEPHENSON CANCER CENTER
As Oklahoma's only comprehensive academic cancer center, the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma is raising the standard of cancer treatment in the state and region through patient-centered care, research and education. In association with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is decreasing the burden of cancer in Oklahoma through innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research. Cancer Center scientists are conducting more than 100 cancer research projects supported by more than $20 million in peer-reviewed annual funding from sponsors, including the National Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society. The Stephenson Cancer Center is located in a state-of-the-art, 210,000-square-foot facility on the campus of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City. For additional information, visit www.StephensonCancerCenter.org  For information about clinical trials visit ou-clinical-trials@ouhsc.edu or call (405) 271-8777.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1541Tue, 01 Apr 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Syrian Girl Attacked by Terrorists Gets Help Rebuilding Her Face and Life in OklahomaSuzana is a typical 17-year-old who enjoys computer games and hanging out with friends. One day, last fall, her life changed forever when she was shot by snipers in her hometown of Homs, a city in western Syria. Five months later, her physical scars are virtually non-existent, thanks to the help of surgeons and providers with OU Children's Physicians and Dean McGee Eye Institute.

Last fall, Suzana was walking home from school with two of her friends when snipers began shooting at them. Her friends were killed and Suzana was shot in the head and left for dead. Somehow she survived, but she lost her left eye and some brain tissue. Her wound was attended to and her skin sewn closed at a Syrian hospital and she was sent home to recover. 

Thanks to friends and family living in Oklahoma, Suzana was able to come here and be seen by physicians at OU Children's Physicians and Dean McGee Eye Institute. Once here, Timothy Mapstone, M.D., chair of Neurosurgery at the OU College of Medicine, and Christian El Amm, M.D., OU Children's Physicians plastic surgeon, performed a combined procedure for reconstruction of the bones in her eye socket and frontal area. Additionally, Mapstone surgically repaired dural (pertaining to the outermost and toughest of three membranes covering the brain) tears and removed some dead brain tissue. 

Once Suzana's eye was prepared for a prosthetic eye, she was seen by Annie Moreau, M.D., and Reagan H. Bradford, Jr., M.D., at Dean McGee Eye Institute and Nancy Lambert, B.C.O., director of Ocular Prosthetic Services, who fitted and designed her prosthetic eye. She received her new eye on March 17, six days before her 17th birthday.

"Our entire team, including all these physicians, nurses and therapists are all committed to returning children, like Suzana, to health and normal childhood," Mapstone said.    

Suzana is anxious to return to her home in Syria at the end of April. She will return to school in the fall, as a high school senior.

OU Children's 
Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty.  More than 175 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 

OU Children's
Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.

The Dean McGee Eye Institute
Is dedicated to serving all Oklahomans and the global community through excellence and leadership in patient care, education and vision research.  It is one of the largest and most respected eye institutes in the United States and houses the Department of Ophthalmology for the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. Its research and training programs are among the most highly regarded in the country.  Twenty of the Institute's ophthalmologists are listed in the Best Doctors in America; its Director of Vision Research is a Past President of the International Society for Eye Research, Past Vice President of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology and a recipient of  ARVO's prestigious Proctor Medal; two members of the faculty are recent or current directors of the American Board of Ophthalmology; three serve on the Board of Trustees of the American Academy of Ophthalmology; one is Vice Chair of the Residency Review Committee in Ophthalmology for the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education; and one is President of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and a Past President of the American Glaucoma Society.   

For more information, visit www.dmei.org.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1546Tue, 01 Apr 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Family Medicine Provider Joins OU Physicians Elizabeth Wickersham, M.D., a family medicine physician, has established her medical practice with OU Physicians. 
      
As a family medicine physician, Wickersham provides primary care services for adults and children. She is specifically interested in preventative medicine, hospice and palliative care. She is board certified in family medicine and hospice and palliative medicine and has been in practice in Oklahoma City for the past 15 years. 
      
Wickersham completed a residency and served as chief resident through the Great Plains Family Practice Residency Program in Oklahoma City. She earned her medical degree from the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine after earning her bachelor's degree in chemistry at OU in Norman.
      
Wickersham sees patients in the OU Physicians Family Medicine clinic, 900 N.E. 10th Street, Oklahoma City. For appointments, call (405) 271-4311.
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1535Thu, 27 Mar 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Urologic Oncologist Joins OU PhysiciansUrologic oncologist Jonathan E. Heinlen, M.D., has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. He has also been named an assistant professor in the Department of Urology at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. Urology is the surgical specialty dealing with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and disorders of the urinary tract and reproductive organs. 
      
Heinlen, who was born in Tulsa, was previously in private practice in Oklahoma City. He completed a fellowship in urologic oncology and advanced robotic surgery at the City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, Calif. He completed his urology residency and general surgery internship at the OU College of Medicine, where he also earned his medical degree. He earned his undergraduate degree at OU in Norman. 
      
Heinlen is a member of the Oklahoma State Urological Association, American Urological Association, Society of Urologic Oncology and American College of Surgeons.          
      
He sees patients at the Stephenson Cancer Center, 800 N.E. 10th Street, and OU Physicians Building, 825 N.E. 10th Street, both in Oklahoma City. Appointments can be made by calling (405) 271-6452. 
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1534Wed, 26 Mar 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Secret to Weight Loss Success May Rest in Small StepsThree months into 2014, most who resolved to lose weight or lead a healthier lifestyle have long since abandoned those changes, but not so for participants of a relatively new program at the Harold Hamm Diabetes Center at the University of Oklahoma.
 
The program is called Small Steps, Big Changes, established by Diabetes Center healthcare professionals as a diabetes prevention program that also empowers participants to live healthier   through nutritional planning and exercise education.
 
"Diabetes can overwhelm those at risk of developing it; but it can be prevented with a few changes to a person's diet and by becoming more physically active," said Steve Sternlof, Ph.D., licensed psychologist at Harold Hamm Diabetes Center. "Educating people to prevent diabetes through a healthy lifestyle is the closest thing we have to curing it."
 
Sternlof and his colleagues at the Diabetes Center believed the program could have a major impact on those who participated and would translate into increased healthcare savings for all involved, including the state of Oklahoma.  They were right on both counts.
 
Floyd Brassfield is a prime example of its success for participants. He enrolled in the Small Steps, Big Changes program to gain a new perspective on healthy living, but it's what he lost that has been his biggest reward.
 
"Since joining the program, I have lost over 42 pounds and continue to lose weight on a weekly basis. The knowledge and accountability my coaches offer in this program has had a major impact on how I think about food, nutrition, and overall health," Brassfield said.
 
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation issued a report last year that noted a five percent reduction in body mass index, on average, for Oklahomans, would mean a reduction in the state's healthcare costs of $7.4 billion by 2030.
 
"If we could help people lose weight, we knew we could not only prevent diabetes but also a number of obesity-related health issues. It was a natural fit for us to help curb the diabetes and obesity epidemics," said Sternlof.  
 
According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, the risk for developing diabetes drops by 58 percent if a person can reduce his or her body weight by seven to ten percent. Floyd accomplished this goal by week eight of the program.  
 
"I joined the program because I have a family history of type 2 diabetes and wanted to avoid gastric bypass surgery, something I thought was going to be my last option," he said.
 
Floyd credits the 16-week course with teaching him how to plan a healthy meal, read food labels more accurately, and replace high calorie foods with healthy alternatives.  
 
"I've been a part of weight loss programs in the past, but this one has taught me to think differently about food and has given me an incentive to stop dieting and start living with a different mentality about what I eat," he said.
 
The Diabetes Center hopes the program can help turn around some sobering statistics in Oklahoma, which currently ranks fourth in the nation for diabetes prevalence. Diabetes-related healthcare costs to the state top $3.25 billion per year, according to the Oklahoma State  Department of Health.
 
The Small Steps, Big Changes curriculum was developed by the Diabetes Prevention Program, a Center for Disease Control initiative that has proven to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 60 percent.  
 
"If we can prevent diabetes before it begins to affect more people, we can effectively save lives and save millions of dollars in healthcare costs," Sternlof added.
 
To learn more about the Small Steps, Big Changes program, visit the center's website at www.haroldhamm.org or call (405) 271-5624. Sessions are offered during the morning, afternoon, and evening.      
The Harold Hamm Diabetes Center at the University of Oklahoma is a world leader in eradicating diabetes through innovative research focused on progress toward a cure, dramatically improved patient care, and strategies aimed at the prevention of diabetes.

For Immediate Release Media Contact: Thomas White @  (405) 271-7000, ext. 43058 Or thomas-white@ouhsc.edu
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1528Wed, 12 Mar 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Radiologist Joins OU PhysiciansRadiologist Rodney A. Kernes, D.O., has established his medical practice at OU Physicians. Radiologists specialize in administering, supervising and interpreting MRI, CT, X-ray, ultrasound and other types of imaging studies. 
      
Kernes recently completed a body imaging fellowship and residency at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. He trained as a radiologic technologist while serving in the U.S. Air Force. He worked in the field for 20 years before returning to college and subsequently beginning his medical training at Nova Southeastern College of Osteopathic Medicine. He transferred to Kansas City University School of Medicine and Biosciences, where he earned his doctor of osteopathic medicine degree with honors. 
      
He is a member of the American Board of Radiology and the American College of Radiology.
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
     
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1518Mon, 10 Mar 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Internal Medicine/Pediatrics Provider Joins OU PhysiciansStephen R. Travis, M.D., an internal medicine/pediatrics provider, has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. 
      
Travis is board certified in both internal medicine and pediatrics. He completed a residency in internal medicine/pediatrics at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. He earned his medical degree at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, after earning a doctor of veterinary medicine from Oklahoma State University.
      
He is also a major in the Medical Corps of the Army National Guard, having  earned a Bronze Star and Meritorious Service Medal.
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1517Mon, 10 Mar 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Body's Immune Response May Play Role in Rapid Heart RateThe simple act of standing up can send some people's heart racing. Now, new research may offer some important insights into this chronic and debilitating condition. 

Researchers at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, the Oklahoma City Veteran's Administration Medical Center and Vanderbilt University identified antibodies, circulating proteins in the blood that fight infections, which appear to play a role in the syndrome. 

The research findings are published online by  the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Known in the medical field as postural tachycardia syndrome, or POTS, the hallmark of this condition is an abnormally rapid heart rate upon standing. Other chronic symptoms (lasting more than six months) may include shortness of breath, weakness upon standing as well as exercise intolerance. It affects about 500,000 people in the United States, most of them young women. 

"This condition is more than a minor annoyance for most patients. It leads to significant life changes and limitations in normal life," said study senior author David Kem, M.D., George Lynn Cross Research Professor of Medicine at the OU Health Sciences Center, a member of its Heart Rhythm Institute,  who performs research and sees patients at the Oklahoma City VA Medical Center.

Jayci Robison, 19, of Cashion, Oklahoma knows all too well the life-changing impact of POTS. 

"I feel my heart racing, my hands start shaking  and I have to sit down," Robison said. 

After months of testing without answers, Robison was referred to specialists at OU Medicine, who diagnosed her with POTS.   

"It's hard for others to understand because I don't look sick," she said. "It's meant a complete and total lifestyle change."

"The cause of POTS is probably multifactorial, with different underlying causes in different patients" said co-author Satish Raj, M.D., MSCI, associate professor of Medicine and Pharmacology at Vanderbilt and Consultant at the Vanderbilt Autonomic Dysfunction Center. However, he added that the research uncovered evidence of "a history of viral-type illness" in some patients. When combined with the antibody discovery, it suggests a potential infection-induced, autoimmune- cause.

In the study, researchers evaluated blood samples from patients with POTS and also from healthy individuals. They found evidence of antibodies in blood samples from patients with POTs that bind to receptors on cells regulating vascular tone and to other receptors on cells involved in the regulation of heart rate.

"Our research found autoantibodies caused changes that altered cell function. These autoantibodies interfere with normal changes in the system that control the ability of blood vessels to become narrower and prevent the expected drop of blood pressure as the patient stands," Kem said. The body compensates for this by increasing sympathetic nerve activity, which helps maintain blood pressure but directly speeds up the heart rate.     

The OU Health Sciences Center team was led by Kem, Xichun Yu, M.D, and post-doctoral student Hongliang Li, M.D., Ph.D.  The same team previously found evidence of antibodies associated with a blood pressure drop upon standing, called orthostatic hypotension.

"We're just at the beginning of a series of studies to try to understand what this means in terms of its potential for impacting the patient care in the clinic," Raj said. "This opens up a new avenue of investigations, both to better characterize and understand the cause, and potentially to look at different treatments."

For Robison, the research brings hope. She still plays basketball, but can only do so for about 10 minutes at a time before feeling like she will pass out. Her dreams of playing basketball in college have been derailed by POTS, but she still dreams. She now she dreams of the day when new treatments can help her reclaim her once active lifestyle.

"This condition has completely changed my life. It can hit at any time. So I bring my medications with me at all times. I try to keep the people around me educated about the condition. I stand up gradually and don't overexert myself," Robison said. 

The research also has captured the attention of Dysautonomia International, an organization committed to helping patients with POTS.

"We are grateful to Dr. Raj, Dr. Kem, and the entire team of researchers who worked on this groundbreaking project," said Lauren Stiles, president of Dysautonomia International. "The POTS patient community is very excited about this research. While there is much work to be done, we are hopeful that this may lead to the development of a blood test that can be used to help diagnose POTS; and more important, new ways of treating POTS by targeting these autoantibodies. Dysautonomia International is going to do everything we can to support the researchers doing this important work."

Investigators from several institutions participated in this research team, including Luis Okamoto, M.D., research instructor in Medicine at Vanderbilt, Michael Hill, Ph.D., University of Missouri, Madeleine Cunningham, Ph.D., University of Oklahoma, Campbell Liles, Oklahoma State University, and Alexandria Benbrook, B.S., Oklahoma City University.

The research is supported by funding from a VA Medical Center Merit Review Award, an American Heart Association Postdoctoral Fellowship, the OU Health Sciences Center's Heart Rhythm Institute, Harold Hamm Diabetes Center at the University of Oklahoma as well as by National Institutes of Health grants including HL056267, HL102387, NS065736 and TR000445.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1509Tue, 04 Mar 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Board-Certified Pediatrician Joins OU Children's PhysiciansShawn W. Cochrane, M.D., a board-certified pediatrician, has established his practice with OU Children's Physicians. 
      
Cochrane comes to OU Children's Physicians from Colorado, where he was a practicing pediatrician. He completed his pediatrics residency at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora. He earned his medical degree at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine where he also earned a doctorate in Cell Biology. He earned his undergraduate degree at the University of Oklahoma in Norman.
      
He is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics.
      
Cochrane is seeing patients at OU Children's Physicians Grand Prairie Pediatrics, located at 7301 N. Comanche Ave., Oklahoma City. For appointments, call (405) 271-4646.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
More than 175 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1506Fri, 28 Feb 2014 00:00:00 GMT
New $1.5 Million Grant to Fund Infertility Research at OUThe five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health is the largest to date for the OU reproductive medicine team. It adds the OU Health Sciences to an elite group of centers nationwide participating in cutting-edge infertility research. 

"We were one of six sites selected to participate in a research cooperative, the Reproductive Medicine Network, that will conduct infertility research on a variety of issues," said Karl Hansen, M.D., Ph.D., principal investigator. "This grant represents an important milestone for our Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility program at the OU Health Sciences Center in recognition of our ability to conduct high-quality clinical trials in the area of reproductive medicine."

The Reproductive Medicine Network was created to carry out important multi-center clinical trials that are too large to be carried out by a single institution.  Currently, the OU Health Sciences Center is the only site in the central United States named to the network.  Other sites are in Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Georgia and California.

"It allows us to bring promising clinical trials research in reproductive health to this part of the country.   In the past, couples in Oklahoma and the Midwest wouldn't have had access to the newest cutting-edge treatments though participation in these large-scale clinical trials." Hansen said.

As part of its grant proposal, the OU team hopes to evaluate the effectiveness of adding progesterone to the latter phase of the menstrual cycle in combination with oral medications and intrauterine insemination on pregnancy rates. Progesterone would be supplemented with a vaginal gel designed to deliver the hormone slowly over a 24-hour period. 

"Multiple studies have suggested that supplemental progesterone may improve the outcomes of these types of treatments.  However, all of these studies have been too small to definitively answer the question," Hansen said.

All six centers selected to participate in the Reproductive Medicine Network have submitted research proposals. Hansen said that means the OU team will have the opportunity to participate in several quality studies over the next five years. 
Rebekah and Charles Swantek of Shawnee know how important those clinical trials can be. They had no trouble conceiving their first child; but five years and several miscarriages later, they began to wonder if they would ever have a second child. A referral to Dr. Hansen and the reproductive health team changed all of that.

"We were patients and also offered the opportunity to participate in a clinical trial," Rebekah Swantek said. "When you are trying to grow your family and you have a problem with that, for whatever reason, it can be consuming and overwhelming.  So, when a clinical trial comes along that you have to qualify for and meet certain parameters, it means there is a scientist somewhere that thinks they can help you, and there is hope in that."
 
Thanks to that clinical trial and the care they received at OU Medicine, the Swanteks were successful in conceiving and delivering a healthy baby girl.  Just 18 months later, they delivered another baby girl.  

"I can't say enough about Dr. Hansen and the entire team," she said. In Dr. Hansen's office you don't just feel like a patient, you honestly feel like they care about you and your end result every step of the way.  
Dr. Hansen said the new grant will bring more promising, new clinical trials to Oklahoma  for the benefit of couples struggling with infertility throughout the state and the region. 

"The network has previously studied important fertility issues including determining the best treatments for unexplained infertility, the best culture conditions for in vitro fertilization and the best method of inducing ovulation in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome, to name a few," Hansen said. 
In addition, Hansen said the grant also brings an important opportunity for the OU Reproductive Medicine team.  

"The knowledge we gain from participation in clinical trials as part of the Reproductive Medicine Network can ultimately help bring even more research grant dollars to the OU Health Sciences Center," Hansen said. 
The $1.5 million grant was awarded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1504Thu, 27 Feb 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Surgeon Joins OU PhysiciansAaron M. Scifres, M.D., has established his surgical practice with OU Physicians. He was also named a clinical associate professor of surgery at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.
      
Scifres specializes in trauma surgery and surgical critical care. He is board certified in surgery and surgical critical care. He completed a fellowship in surgical critical care at Barnes-Jewish Hospital/Washington University in St. Louis. 
      
Scifres completed his general surgery residency at the OU College of Medicine. He completed a research fellowship at the University of Washington Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle. He earned his medical degree at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago.
      
Scifres is a member of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and a fellow of the American College of Surgeons.
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1499Tue, 25 Feb 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Even Slightly Elevated Blood Pressure Negatively Impacts Heart Over TimeIt turns out blood pressure doesn't have to be high enough to meet the clinical definition of hypertension to do damage to your cardiovascular system.

While high blood pressure is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular disease, newly published findings by researchers at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center offer new insights into the impact of even slightly elevated blood pressure over time on one's risk of developing heart disease. 

The research, published this month in the Journal of the American Medical Association, is co-authored by Christina Shay, Ph. D., of the University of Oklahoma College of Public Health. It traces blood pressure trajectories in thousands of patients from young adulthood to middle age. The study specifically looks at the association between these trajectories and the level of heart disease that exists just below the level of clinical detection.

"We actually have a quarter of a century of information collected on many different characteristics of the participants that are related to cardiovascular disease," said Shay. "These include many traditional clinical risk factors – like blood pressure – along with measures of lifestyle, several novel biomarkers, and imaging measures of the level of atherosclerosis in the heart and blood vessels."

Drawing upon blood pressure data collected from more than 4600 participants starting in 1985, Shay and co-researchers tracked changes in the participants' blood pressure over 25 years. 

"Some people start young adulthood with optimal levels of blood pressure, and they stay in that range. Some people start at optimal levels of blood pressure and get higher over time. Some people start in elevated ranges, and their blood pressure gets higher over time," Shay said.

While it is known that 33 percent of adults in the United States have high blood pressure, researchers have never examined blood pressure trajectories in this way.

"What we've never been able to look at is this sort of cumulative exposure to various levels of blood pressures over time," says Shay.

The researchers identified five blood pressure trajectory categories based on where participants' blood pressure started and whether it stayed stable or increased. These categories are:

•    Low-stable: blood pressure that starts low and stays low
•    Moderate-stable: blood pressure that begins only slightly elevated and stays that way
•    Moderate-increasing: blood pressure begins only slightly elevated and increases over time
•    Elevated-stable: blood pressure that starts at elevated levels, but does not increase
•    Elevated-increasing: blood pressure that begins elevated and increases over time

The study found that even slightly elevated blood pressure takes its toll over time. In fact, participants in the moderate-stable group were 44 percent more likely to have coronary artery calcification than those in the low-stable group. 

High blood pressure that increases over time significantly boosts the risk. Those in the elevated-increasing group were more than 300 percent more likely to have coronary artery calcification  than individuals in the low-stable group.

"Having any coronary artery calcification is an important measure of cardiovascular disease risk because those individuals are much more likely to have a heart attack than those who without coronary artery calcification," Shay said.

Shay believes the findings -- that even moderate exposure to elevated levels of blood pressure over time cumulatively increases cardiovascular risk--should dispel a common misconception about high blood pressure.

"It worries me that a lot of people are of the mindset that, ‘Well, I'll just worry about my blood pressure when it gets to the point that I need medication.' This study shows that thinking is dangerously flawed. Our study shows that those whose blood pressure is elevated -- but not enough to warrant medication by current clinical standards -- have an increased risk of heart disease and heart attack," Shay said. 

She added the implications for physicians and patients are clear: conversations about blood pressure cannot wait until blood pressure levels increase above optimal levels. These discussions should begin even before rises in blood pressure occur so that patients understand the importance of keeping blood pressure in healthy ranges starting in young adulthood and continuing throughout life to keep their risk of developing cardiovascular disease as low as possible. 
 
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1493Tue, 25 Feb 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Board-Certified Pediatrician Joins OU Children's PhysiciansMelissa A. Lindenau, M.D., a board-certified pediatrician, has established her practice with OU Children's Physicians. 
      
Lindenau was previously a practicing pediatrician in Yukon. She served as chief resident and completed her pediatrics residency at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where she earned her medical degree with distinction. She earned her undergraduate degree at Oklahoma State University.
      
She is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Breastfeeding.
      
Lindenau is seeing patients at OU Children's Physicians Grand Prairie Pediatrics, located at 7301 N. Comanche Ave., Oklahoma City. For appointments, call (405) 271-4646.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
More than 175 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1486Wed, 12 Feb 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Certified Nurse Midwife Joins OU Physicians Lori S. Edwards , A.P.R.N., C.N.M., has established her practice with OU Physicians. Certified nurse midwives are advanced practice, registered nurses who have received extensive academic and clinical training to manage and care for women during low-risk pregnancies and births. Midwives also offer general women's health services.
      
Edwards earned a master's degree in nurse midwifery from Frontier Nursing University, Hyden, Ky. She completed a nurse midwife clinical residency at the Women's and Newborn Center at The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. She earned her nursing degree from OSU-OKC and Oklahoma City University.
      
Edwards is a member of the American College of Nurse-Midwives and the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.
      
OU Physicians certified nurse midwives see patients in the OU Physicians Building, 825 N.E. 10th St., and deliver babies in the Women's and Newborn Pavilion at The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. For an appointment with a nurse midwife, call (405) 271-9494.                                         
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1479Fri, 07 Feb 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Does Time of Year Impact Heart Patient Outcomes?New research from the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center reveals time of year has no impact on the success of heart catheterization procedures.
For some time, there has been the perception that time of year - especially the time when new doctors are beginning their fellowships at hospitals nationwide - can impact outcomes of a variety of medical procedures. 

"This time period is a perceived vulnerable period when you have new trainees starting who aren't as experienced. It is perceived that this inexperience might adversely impact patient care," said Dr. Beau Hawkins with the OU College of Medicine’s Cardiovascular Section of Internal Medicine.  

A fellowship is a part of medical specialists training. It follows the physician’s completion of a specialty training program, also known as a residency. During this time, the physician is known as a fellow. Fellows may serve as an attending or consulting physician in the general field in which they trained, such as internal medicine. After completing a fellowship in a relevant sub-specialty like cardiology, the physician may practice without direct supervision by other physicians in that sub-specialty.

Hawkins and the team set out to determine if time of year had an impact in interventional cardiology, a field of medicine that includes minimally-invasive heart procedures (Percutaneous Coronary Interventions) like balloon angioplasty to open blocked arteries and the placement of stents to help keep them open.  Several hundred thousand of these procedures are performed each year.  
"We wanted to know if patients who received these stents, especially during the time when new fellows are starting, had higher rates of procedural complications and higher rates of adverse outcomes," Hawkins said. 

Hawkins and his team examined a national data registry from 136 hospitals affiliated with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and its accredited interventional cardiology fellowship programs. These hospitals performed more than 309,000 Percutaneous Coronary Interventions during the 2009-2012 study period. More than 61,000 of those PCIs were performed during the July-August time frame.

After comparing the data from those done at the time when fellows are beginning their training and those done later, Hawkins and fellow researchers discovered welcome and reassuring results.
"Essentially what we found was there was no difference in bleeding complications or death rates," he said.

Hawkins believes the consistency of outcomes is due to several factors, including more rigorous supervision of trainees during PCI procedures.

"I think it's really a win-win for everyone involved," Hawkins said. "It's good news for the public at large and for the patients we treat, and also good news for those of us who are very focused on academic medical education."
Hawkins acknowledges the study had some limitations.  For example, a fourth of the hospitals with interventional cardiology fellowships did not participate in the data registry.

The study, funded by the American College of Cardiology Foundation, is published online. It will appear in print in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology in March.  
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1468Fri, 31 Jan 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Board-Certified Pediatric Endocrinologist Joins OU Children's PhysiciansMonica T. Marin, M.D., a board-certified pediatric endocrinologist, has established her practice with OU Children's Physicians. 
      
Pediatric endocrinologists specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases affecting the endocrine system. These may include: diabetes, growth disorders, disorders of cholesterol and triglycerides, disorders of bone and calcium, disorders of early and late puberty, disorders of the pituitary and adrenal glands, childhood obesity and thyroid disorders. 
      
Marin is board certified in pediatric endocrinology and pediatrics. She completed a pediatric endocrinology fellowship at the OU College of Medicine. She completed a pediatrics residency at SUNY Health Science Center at Brooklyn, N.Y., and in Bucharest, Romania. She also completed an internship and earned her medical degree in Bucharest. 
      
Marin is a member of the Pediatric Endocrine Society. 
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
Nearly 150 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board-certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1455Tue, 28 Jan 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Audiologist Joins OU Children's Physicians Audiologist Andy Lau, Au.D., has established his practice with OU Physicians. He will see both adult and pediatric patients
      
Lau earned a Certificate of Clinical Competence in Audiology from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. He has a specific interest in diagnosing patients with balance issues. He also prescribes and fits hearing aids.
      
Lau earned his doctor of audiology degree from Salus University Osborne College of Audiology, Elkins Park, Penn. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Audiology.
      
Lau will see patients at OU Physicians, 825 N.E. 10th St., and OU Children's Physicians, 1200 Children's Ave., Oklahoma City. For appointments, call 405-271-7559. 
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1454Mon, 27 Jan 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Dermatologist Joins OU Physicians Dermatologist Geeta Patel, D.O., has established her practice with OU Physicians. 
      
Patel provides general dermatology and cosmetic services, including treating acne and hair loss. She completed her dermatology residency, serving as chief resident, at Lewis Gale Montgomery Regional Hospital, Blacksburg, Va. She completed her internship at Nassau University Medical Center, East Meadow, N.Y., and earned her osteopathic degree from New York College of Osteopathic Medicine, Old Westbury, N.Y.          
      
Patel is a member of the American Academy of Dermatology, American Osteopathic Association, American Osteopathic College of Dermatology, American Society of Dermatologic Surgery and Women's Dermatologic Society.
      
She sees patients on the OU Health Sciences Center campus at OU Physicians Dermatology, 619 NE 13th Street. For appointments, call 405-271-6110.
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1453Mon, 27 Jan 2014 00:00:00 GMT
New Researcher Boosts Cancer-fighting Efforts in Oklahoma Finding ways to stop the spread of cancer is the focus of work by a new researcher at the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma.  

Jun Chung, Ph.D. brings with him a total grant portfolio of more than $1.4 million in out-of-state funding to Oklahoma. His work centers on developing a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to the metastasis or spread of cancer cells. 

Recent research in his lab studies a specific protein, which plays an important role in how cells communicate with each other and their surrounding environment. When levels of this protein are elevated, it significantly impacts the molecular processes that lead to tumor metastasis. 

Chung currently is focused on the development of a novel therapeutic strategy to block the function of this protein, with a specific emphasis in breast cancer.               

"We are excited to have Dr. Chung join our outstanding team of cancer researchers at the Stephenson Cancer Center," said Robert Mannel, M.D., director of the Cancer Center. "His expertise will enhance research that is occurring in several areas, and we think he will be a great resource and collaborator."  

Chung's research has been supported by competitively-awarded grants from the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society and the Department of Defense.      

Chung will be appointed an Oklahoma TSET Cancer Research Scholar in recognition of the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust's ongoing efforts to reduce the burden of cancer in the state through supporting research. He is one of eleven new cancer researchers recruited in the past year to the Cancer Center and one of eight with NCI funding. The Cancer Center is working to bring at least 20 new NCI-funded researchers to Oklahoma. 

About the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center

As the state's only comprehensive academic cancer center, the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center is raising the standard of cancer care in Oklahoma through research and education. Clinical services at the Stephenson Cancer Center are provided by more than 50 oncology physicians who specialize in all types of cancer. In partnership with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is decreasing the burden of cancer in Oklahoma by supporting innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research. The Stephenson Cancer Center has over 160 research members who are conducting more than 100 cancer research projects at institutions across the state. This research is supported by more than $25 million in annual funding from sponsors such as the National Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society.  
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1452Fri, 24 Jan 2014 00:00:00 GMT
Newest Mammogram Technology Provides 3-D ImageryThere are 3-D movies, 3-D video games and now, 3-D mammograms. In entertainment, three dimensions add to the viewing or gaming experience. In medicine, adding another dimension helps radiologists spot tumors that might otherwise be missed. It's called breast tomosysthesis, a mammography system that utilizes multiple images and a high-powered, computer software system to build a 3-D view of the breast.

"The first time I saw breast tomosynthesis, I knew we had to have it," said Elizabeth Jett, M.D., director of the OU Breast Institute. "I have not met the radiologist who, once they see this, wouldn't rather read tomosynthesis." 

A breast tomosynthesis exam is similar to a traditional, digital mammogram. However, during tomosynthesis, the x-ray arm sweeps in a slight arc over the breast, taking multiple breast images in seconds. Very low x-ray energy is used. So exposure to the patient is about the same as that of a traditional mammogram.  

"In a typical mammogram, the breast is compressed and all of the tissue is superimposed on the image," Jett said. "What tomosynthesis gives us is the ability to scroll through the mammogram one millimeter slice at a time."

As a result, tumors that might be obscured in a normal mammogram can be seen. Jett said in studies where traditional mammography found four breast cancers in every 1,000 women examined, breast tomosynthesis found seven.

"They aren't even necessarily tiny tumors. Compressed breast tissue can hide big tumors too. In the studies on tomosynthesis, the cancers found that were not seen on mammography ranged from a few millimeters to four centimeters (over 1.5 inches) in diameter," Jett said. 

The other key advantage is for women with dense breast tissue because breast tissue that is superimposed in traditional mammography can mimic a mass. With tomosynthesis, though, the radiologist can scroll through the layers and see that it is just breast tissue, thereby eliminating the need for additional screenings.

"So we are calling back fewer women and having fewer diagnostic workups. That is what is so compelling about this technology. In fact, our call backs have been reduced by about 40 percent with tomosynthesis," Jett said.

She said regular mammography is still great for women who have relatively fatty breast tissue. Fatty breast tissue is easy to see through on a traditional mammogram. However, Jett believes the popularity of tomosynthesis will grow as technology advances and allows for increased sensitivity and a reduction in radiation too. 

The OU Breast Institute is one of several facilities in Oklahoma that are already offering breast tomosynthesis. Although the cost is slightly higher when compared to traditional mammography, Jett said the potential savings are substantial when one considers that tomosynthesis helps eliminate the need for unneeded additional screening tests by reducing the number of false positives. In addition, it can help bring improved outcomes for cancer patients by catching tumors early that might be missed with traditional mammography. 

Jett said there is not a standardized payment schedule yet for breast tomosynthesis with insurance companies. Therefore, some facilities bill for a traditional mammogram, while offering the enhanced technology as an option to patients. Others charge as much as $50 to $100 more for breast tomosynthesis. 

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1450Tue, 21 Jan 2014 00:00:00 GMT
OU Researcher Awarded $1.9 Million Grant to Study Workplace HazardA researcher at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center has been awarded a four-year, $1.9 million grant to study a topic that impacts many workers on the job – skin irritations that arise due to contact with a variety of chemicals.
As we all know, the workplace can be a place with hazards--not just because of falls oraccidents, but also because of contact with industrial chemicals. Those chemicals can produce an acute inflammatory response in the skin called contact dermatitis.
"It's very common and there's very little research that's been done to look at this,” said lead researcher Randy Gallucci, Ph.D., an associate professor in the OU College of Pharmacy. "Contact dermatitis is the second most common reason for lost work, reduced productivity on the job and time away from work. It's that prevalent.”

Contact dermatitis is one of the top 10 reasons for patient visits to their primary care physicians and 8 in 10 of those cases is caused by an irritant as opposed to an allergic reaction.
"Irritant contact dermatitis is a skin reaction that looks a bit like a burn. The skin may appear dry, red and rough. Cuts or cracks may also form on the hands,” said Dr. Pamela Allen, a dermatologist with OU Physicians. "It's triggered by contact with acids, alkaline substances like soaps or detergents, fabric softeners, solvents or other chemicals.”

There are hundreds of substances alleged to cause contact dermatitis. Exposure to these substances can produce contact dermatitis. 
A few of the more commonly used substances are the detergent SLS (found in everything from bathroom cleaners to shampoos) and the disinfectant benzalkonium chloride used in hand wipes. 
Allen said irritant dermatitis usually clears up without complications in 2 or 3 weeks if the offending agent is avoided. However, it may return if the substance or material that caused it cannot be found or avoided. 
With the grant from the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Gallucci and his team will study why susceptibility to this type of dermatitis varies among workers. 

"One of our main aims is to try to figure out what the difference is. For example, why some people have problems with detergents and other people do not," he said.
Gallucci and his team of researchers will focus on the role played by Interleukin 6, an immune protein produced by most cells in the body, which is associated with skin healing and protection. Gallucci calls IL-6 "an immune messenger." 

"When a white blood cell, for example, detects bacteria or damage to the skin, it makes IL-6 to summon help,” he said.
The effects of Interleukin 6 can be unpredictable depending on where it is produced in the body. In the skin, though, it appears to have an anti-inflammatory function.   
The long-term goal of the OU team's research is two-fold. 

"The first goal would be to help identify workers who might be susceptible to these contact irritants so they can take proper or specialized precautions,” Gallucci said. "In addition, we would hope to be able to use what we know about IL-6 to develop a treatment like a lotion or something similar that would help increase the skins' defense against these irritants."

None of this will happen overnight, however, Gallucci emphasized. As with most pharmaceuticals, he estimates the development of a novel protective lotion based upon the team's research might take up to a decade to move from the laboratory through the Food and Drug Administration approval process and finally to market.  
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1436Friday, December 20, 2014
Gift of Hearing for Moore Tornado SurvivorA Moore tornado survivor received the gift of hearing for the holidays this year, thanks to the efforts of audiologists at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and the Starkey Foundation.
 
For many, having the ability to hear is not something given much daily thought. For Moore resident Bunny White, however, that precious channel to human connection and communication was significantly altered after an EF5 tornado ripped through her community, badly damaging her home in May.
 
White runs a child care in a building behind her home, which was in the path of the May 20 tornado. She said she huddled with the children in a back room as it roared by on May 20. In the aftermath, seeing to the needs of the children in her care and reuniting them with their parents took priority. White had little time to think about herself, the damage to her home or all that had been lost. In fact, it was a couple of days before she realized that her hearing aids were gone.
 
"She called the clinic to inquire about being able to replace her hearing aids, which were lost as a result of the tornado," said Christi M. Barbee, Au.D., an audiologist and assistant professor at the OU College of Allied Health. "I wanted to be able to give her the opportunity to hear well again, despite the fact that she did not have the budget to replace her hearing aids."
 
Barbee took the lead, tapping the expertise on her colleagues and coordinating efforts to ensure White would receive the assistance she needed.
 
"I know for Bunny it's been a struggle to communicate with the children ever since that situation – just recovering emotionally and psychologically from the tornado and then to have to struggle with hearing along with that only added to the complications. We knew we wanted to do what we could to help," said Suzanne Kimball, Au.D., assistant professor, OU College of Allied Health.
 
The college's John. W. Keys Speech and Hearing Center found an eager partner in the Starkey Foundation and its Hear Now program. Funded by the foundation, providers and donors across the country, Hear Now assists those who lack the resources to acquire hearing aids. Through their combined efforts, White  was able to get new hearing aids – better than the ones she had lost to the tornado - and the services required to fit them.
 
"When she told me they would be able to help, I didn't believe it at first," White said, explaining that without their help she could never have afforded to replace the aids.
 
It took a few months to get everything lined out, but the gift of hearing for White came just in time for Christmas. Tears of joy welled up in her eyes as they turned on her new hearing aids for the first time at the college's audiology clinic.
 
"It made me cry just them testing the aids because I knew I was going to be able to hear what my son said again – just being able to hear and understand him," White said.
 
It was an emotional day for the team at the OU College of Allied Health too.
 
"It was very emotional for her and initially we thought she was sad until we realized that they were tears of joy that she was shedding in our clinic," Kimball said.
White says they were tears of joy, but also tears of gratitude for the gift she had just been given.

"I didn't really believe it at first. It's one of those things… it's too good to be true. Even when I walked out of the clinic, it was like someone is just going to come up and take them back."
White has been so focused on trying to put everything else back together that she said it was difficult to focus on her own needs.
 
Although it took a few months to pull it all together, OU audiologists knew the gift of new hearing aids couldn't have come at a better time.
 
"It's so important to be able to communicate with family and friends during the holidays," Kimball explained. "So we couldn't be any more happy than to be able to provide this for Bunny in the holiday season so she can enjoy that special time with her family and friends."
For White, the ability to hear her own young son and the voices of the children for whom she cares is the best gift of all this Christmas.
 
"This is the reason I chose a health profession. I love being able to help people, and hearing is a wonderful gift that helps connect people with each other," Barbee said.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1437Tuesday, December 24, 2014
OU Researcher Lands $1.9 Million Grant to Study Workplace HazardHave you ever experienced raw, cracking hands after coming into contact with a certain substance? It happens a lot.

Now, a researcher at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center has been awarded a four-year, $1.9 million grant to study a topic that impacts many workers on the job – skin irritations that arise due to contact with a variety of chemicals.

Industrial chemicals, soaps and detergents, and disinfectants – even long-term exposure to wet diapers - can trigger the acute inflammatory response in the skin called contact dermatitis. Contact dermatitis is one of the top 10 reasons for patient visits to their primary care physicians and 8 in 10 of those cases is caused by an irritant as opposed to an allergic reaction. 

When it happens, it looks a bit like a burn. The skin may appear dry, red and rough. Cuts or cracks may also form on the hands.  If it has happened to you, you know the discomfort it can cause, as well as the lost productivity for you and your employer. Some people have even had to change jobs.

OU researchers hope their work will lead to new ways to prevent or treat the skin condition, and also to develop a way to better predict which workers will be impacted.

What:  Media Briefing
When:  1:00 p.m., Friday – December 20, 2013
Where: Auditorium
             Samis Education Center, 1200 Children’s (formerly Philips) Avenue, 
              south of NE 13th
             (Enter at Children’s Hospital Atrium – Education Center is on right)
 
A live stream of the media briefing can be viewed at: http://www.universityhospitalsauthority.com/streaming/viewer/ 
 
Some support footage is available.
 
(Media may utilize valet parking or park in the lot on the south side of the Atrium – Code is 7600.)
 
For additional information, contact: Theresa Green @ (405) 833-9824 or Theresa-green@ouhsc.edu
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1429Thu, 19 Dec 2013 00:00:00 GMT
OU Medicine Physicians Restore Hope for Oklahoma City Woman Through Unique Surgical Approach to Removing TumorsOklahoma City businesswoman Bonnie Naifeh can finally say she is optimistic about her future after a bout with a tumor that grew in the middle of her head.  
A frustrating battle against a persistent tumor in her pituitary gland now appears to be over thanks to a team of physicians at OU Medical Center who removed it through her nose by using a procedure that is less invasive than traditional approaches. 
The procedure—called endoscopic pituitary surgery—uses an endoscope, or a thin tube that has a built-in microscope, light and camera to reach the tumor through the nose.
Naifeh's surgery was performed in July. It was the third time she'd undergone attempts to remove the tumor, which kept growing back. The side effects got worse, so she came to OU Medical Center. 

"I was terrified. I was thinking this is the third time and I'm out, probably...I'm going to die."  
Fortunately, most pituitary gland tumors are not cancerous, but left untreated, a person could lose their eyesight. Studies show that some tumors can cause more disease, even death.  
Naifeh's endoscopic pituitary surgery was part of a team approach at OU Medical Center, including ear, nose and throat surgeons, neurosurgeons and an endocrinologist. 

The ear, nose and throat surgeon first paved the way to the tumor.  By watching images from the endoscope on a video monitor, the surgeon then passed the scope through the bony back wall of the sinus.  The neurosurgeon stepped in after the scope reached the pituitary area and removed the tumor in tiny pieces. 

Because the pituitary gland is responsible for regulating most of a body's hormones, an endocrinologist who specializes in glands and hormones was also involved throughout the process. The endonasal endoscopic technique provides a better view than other methods which limit a surgeon's vision and flexibility. Surgeons at OU Medical Center use a single nostril technique, which is less invasive than the commonly-used two nostril approach.

"The endoscope allows me to look around the corners of the pituitary area.  In the past, surgeons could only see down a very narrow, straight path—perhaps not seeing the entire tumor.  The endoscope allows for greater accessibility," said Dr. Michael Sughrue, the OU Medical Center neurosurgeon who performed Naifeh's procedure.

Ear, nose and throat surgeon, Dr. Jose Sanclement said he and Sughrue used a unique, single-nostril approach during Naifeh's surgery. The physicians believe it makes the procedure even less invasive than other endoscopic tumor removals.  

"It is a more stealth or less invasive, approach. There's better healing, it's more anatomical and functional—leaving their anatomy essentially unchanged," Sanclement said.  
Before coming to OU Medical Center, Naifeh experienced many complications after a different type of surgery attempted to remove the tumor—which eventually grew back. 

"With my second surgery, it took so long for me to come back.  After this surgery, my sense of smell is working, my sense of taste is working and I feel so blessed. I feel nothing has been altered with this surgery," Naifeh said. 
Post-surgery, endocrinologist, Dr. Jonea Lim manages Naifeh's pituitary hormone production as a key component in the multidisciplinary approach.

"I assess baseline pituitary hormone production before and after surgery and manage them accordingly," Lim said. Naifeh looks forward to a tumor-free future.

"My thoughts overall are that I am so grateful, because if I had not gone to that team, it might not have been done as thoroughly.  I've had minimal down-time. It's been very positive," Naifeh said.   
For more information about endonasal endoscopic surgery (EEA) and other unique types of surgeries, please visit www.oumedicine.com/neurotumor.

OU MEDICINE
OU Medicine is the collective brand for OU Medical Center, OU Physicians and the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. Headquartered at the Oklahoma Health Center campus near downtown Oklahoma City, OU Medicine is the state's largest academic medical complex. Among other things, it provides health care, conducts medical research and educates the physicians of tomorrow.  

OU Medical Center is home to the state's only level one trauma center and The Children's Hospital, Oklahoma's most comprehensive pediatric facility. Members of OU Physicians, the state's largest physicians group, provide care at the hospital facilities and at OU Physicians clinics in Oklahoma City and across the state. The practice includes almost every adult and child specialty, and some of its physicians have pioneered treatments or procedures that are world-firsts. 
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1428Tue, 17 Dec 2013 00:00:00 GMT
A Nose for Brain SurgeryYou think about breathing through your nose, blowing your nose, but removing a tumor through the nose?  

It's a new, less invasive approach utilized by a team of surgeons at the OU Medical Center. An Oklahoma City business woman is now tumor free thanks to the procedure, which removed a tumor from the middle of her head. 

The procedure—called endoscopic pituitary surgery—uses an endoscope, or a thin tube that has a built-in microscope, light and camera to reach the tumor through the nose. The surgery requires the expertise of several specialists - an ear, nose and throat surgeon, a neurosurgeon and an endocrinologist.

The patient and physicians will discuss the procedure with reporters at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, December 17, 2013 at the Samis Education Center.


What:  Media Briefing
When:  10:00 a.m., TOMORROW, Tuesday – December 17, 2013
Where:   Auditorium
              Samis Education Center,
              1200 Children's (formerly Philips) Avenue, south of NE 13th
              (Enter at Children's Hospital Atrium – 
              Education Center is on right)
 
A live stream of the media briefing can be viewed at: http://www.universityhospitalsauthority.com/streaming/viewer/
 
Pool camera footage of the patient's surgery is available - DVDs will be available or contact us for information to Download from FTP.
 
(Media may utilize valet parking or park in the lot on the south side of the Atrium – Code is 7600.)
 
For additional information, contact: Theresa Green @ (405) 833-9824 or Theresa-green@ouhsc.edu
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1420Mon, 16 Dec 2013 00:00:00 GMT
What's in a Meal?What's for lunch?

That question gets asked a lot every day by adults, by children, and by Dr. Susan B. Sisson and graduate student Ashley Frampton at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. Both are especially interested in what's being served to children at Oklahoma's child care centers.

"Kids are spending a substantial amount of time in child care," Sisson said. "They're getting at least lunch, oftentimes breakfast, and one or two snacks per day."

Sisson is an assistant professor in the Department of Nutritional Sciences at the OU College of Allied Health and director of the Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Laboratory. In addition to her graduate studies, Frampton is a dietitian in the Department of Pediatrics at OU Medicine in Tulsa.  

Both know adequate and appropriate nutrition is critical for a child's health and development. Ensuring children eat nutritious meals is important everywhere, but Sisson said especially in Oklahoma where the obesity level among children is higher than the national average. Because so many children between the ages of 2 and 5 spend so much time at day cares, knowing what they are eating while there is important.  

Sisson produced an earlier study of child care practices relating to healthy eating at the state's child care centers, a study that relied upon self-reporting by child care center officials. This latest study goes a step further.

"With this study the difference is, we evaluated what they had on their actual menu -- one full week of lunches -- and we entered that into our nutrient software," Sisson says. "The analysis tells us the number of calories and the percentage of carbohydrates and fact the kids were being served." 

Sisson and Frampton examined lunch menus from 83 child care centers, in both urban and rural areas, across Oklahoma. They calculated the nutrient levels of the foods in those menus and then compared them to a national measure known as Dietary Reference Intakes. The research brought mixed results.

"The child care menus were providing adequate amounts of some nutrients but not enough of other nutrients," Sisson said.

She said the menu nutritional analysis revealed adequate amounts of protein, vitamin C, zinc, magnesium, vitamin A and calcium in the meals served at state child care centers. However, they were lacking when it came to the amount of carbohydrates, fiber, iron, vitamin D and vitamin E.

Overall, Sisson said Oklahoma child cares are making passing grades when it comes to childhood nutrition. In fact, if pressed, she might give them a B minus, but she said the team's research shows there is definitely room for improvement. 

Sisson and her team now plan to take their research on the road. Their newest research involves visiting child care centers across Oklahoma. During those visits, they will personally inspect what's for lunch and then evaluate how it stacks up nutritionally. 

The latest OU child care nutrition research is published in this week's online issue of the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1414Thu, 12 Dec 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Holiday Togetherness Can Be Hazardous to Your HealthTis the season for stores and malls crowded with holiday shoppers, for holiday parties and for family gatherings, but it is also the time when we tend to spread wintertime illnesses along with all of that holiday cheer. 

"This is the time of year when doctor's offices get very busy. If you or your children have been battling sore throats, coughs and the aches and pains that often accompany illness, you are not alone. It seems when people gather, we see more illness," said Dr. Robert Welliver, an infectious disease specialist with OU Physicians. "The good news is that a little prevention can go a long way toward keeping you and your family healthy during the holidays."

Best Shot to Stay Healthy
The flu is miserable and being down with influenza is no way to spend the holidays. A flu shot is valued protection during the winter months and it is not too late to vaccinate. 

"Influenza is serious," Welliver said. "Everyone should get vaccinated—it protects you and keeps you from spreading the virus to other people."

While timing of the flu varies and is sometimes unpredictable, seasonal flu activity usually begins in October, then peaks in January or February and ends as late as May. 

This year, a new quadrivalent -- or four-part -- vaccine is available for the first time in an effort to target even more flu strains. The flu shot is available through your health care provider and at many pharmacies across Oklahoma too. 

Welliver added that it is also important to make sure that all of your child's vaccinations are up to date.

Hand-to-hand Combat Helps Prevent Illness 
"Hand washing is so simple and yet such a powerful weapon when it comes to illness prevention," Welliver said. "Although viruses are sometimes spread through the air, the most common method of transmission is by hand. So the more we wash our hands, the fewer infections we are going to contract."
 
Proper hand washing takes a little effort. Ideally, lather your hands with soap and water and really scrub well for 15 to 30 seconds. Interestingly, though, even a cursory hand washing, if done often, can help prevent the transmission of illness. 

Another tip is to avoid coughing into your hand. Instead, cover your face with your arm and cough into your elbow. This helps keep disease-spreading bugs from getting on your hands and being spread to others.

Don't touch your face and teach your children not to touch their faces either. Welliver explained that bacteria and viruses sometimes can be on the surfaces we touch. If we then touch our eyes, nose or mouth, they have entry into our bodies and can cause infection.

Eat Well, Sleep Well
It's sometimes too easy to put healthy nutrition on the back burner in the hustle and bustle of the holiday season, but good nutrition helps boost the body's own illness-fighting power. So do keep proper nutrition in mind in the midst of your holiday celebrations.

"Family schedules often go out the window during the holiday season. Bedtimes slide to make room for parties and family gatherings, but sleep is really vital to staying healthy,"Welliver  said.

Sticking to regular mealtimes and bedtimes helps ensure better nutrition and adequate rest for our children and for us too. 

Stay Home When Sick
If you aren't feeling well, doctors advise staying home from work or school to feel better sooner. 

"Interestingly, staying home can help prevent the spread of illness, but not eliminate it altogether. That's because often you are contagious days before you experience your first symptoms; but staying home definitely will help you feel a lot better, a lot sooner," Welliver said. 

Some people will till try to keep going by taking medication. Medications can help reduce the fever as well as the aches and pains that go along with many wintertime illnesses; but as the medication wears off, you will start feeling badly again. Ultimately, Welliver said rest is what your body needs most when battling illness. So stay home, rest and drink plenty of fluids.

No Magic Pill
Winter-time illness is common and you may want to check in with your pediatrician or family physician, but remember there is no magic pill that will make you suddenly feel better.

"A lot of parents believe that antibiotics will help, but antibiotics are not effective against viruses. Welliver said. 

Some folks believe that large amounts of vitamin C will ward off illness. Welliver said while it won't hurt you, it probably won't help much either. Zinc is another supplement that has grown more popular in recent years with claims that it can reduce the severity or duration of cold symptoms. However, recent research found no differences between individuals receiving zinc and those receiving a placebo.

For more information about ensuring a healthy holiday for the entire family, visit a special web page with helpful topics ranging from eating healthy to keeping peace during the holidays at www.OUMedicine.com/HolidayHealth.    
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1413Wed, 11 Dec 2013 00:00:00 GMT
OU Medicine Offers New Hearing System for Patients with Single-Sided DeafnessUsing your teeth to hear? It sounds a little crazy, but new technology now available at OU Medicine is helping patients with single-sided deafness hear again. 

It's called the SoundBite™ Hearing System. It is the world's first removable, non-surgical hearing solution that uses the well-established principle of bone conduction along with advanced wireless and sound-processing technology to transmit sound via the teeth to the inner ear. 

"Bone conduction has long been recognized as one of the most effective methods of bringing sound to patients with hearing loss in one ear. With the SoundBite System, we can custom-fit patients with a non-invasive, high-tech solution without surgery, without need for a permanent implant," said Dr. Betty Tsai, board-certified otolaryngologist with OU Physicians. "It's not a hearing aid. A hearing aid simply amplifies sound. SoundBite is a prosthetic hearing system. It replaces the function of the damaged hearing nerve."

Sound waves travel through air to our inner ears, but they can also arrive via bone. For instance, familiar sounds like scratching your scalp, crunching potato chips or chattering your teeth are transmitted to the inner ear through bone conduction. SoundBite takes advantage of a person's natural teeth structures as the bone conductor to transfer sound vibrations to the cochlea of the inner ear thereby restoring hearing to the impaired ear.

An estimated 50,000 people in the United States experience unilateral hearing loss each year, typically caused by viral infections, Menieres disease, head or ear trauma or through surgical intervention to remove acoustic neuruomas or other brain tumors.

Dustin Brown, 27, of Meeker underwent surgery to remove a tumor, leaving him deaf in one ear. Now, thanks to SoundBite, his hearing has been restored. 

"That's awesome," Brown exclaimed shortly after being fitted with SoundBite as the technician whispered in his previously impaired ear.

Unlike bone-anchored hearing aids that use a surgical implant on the skull, the SoundBite system consists of two user-friendly components. The first is an easy-to-insert, easy-to-remove, In-The-Mouth hearing device that's custom made to fit around the upper left or right back molar teeth. The other component is a small, Behind-The-Ear microphone unit that tucks behind and inside the impaired ear. Both components have rechargeable batteries and the system comes with its own charger. 

SoundBite is barely visible when worn. It requires no dental work or modifications to the teeth. 

"SoundBite represents a great new option for patients with single-sided deafness," said Angela Gathers, CCC-A,OU Physicians audiologist. "The entire process takes only a few weeks – from start to finish."

SoundBite is FDA-approved for the treatment of single-sided deafness. It is appropriate for patients 18 years or older who suffer from moderately severe, severe or profound sensorineural hearing loss in one ear and have normal hearing in the other ear. It is intended for patients with sound oral health and tooth structures. 
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1405Thu, 05 Dec 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Breast Surgeon Joins Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer CenterBeverly J. Talbert, M.D., a surgical oncologist, has established her surgical practice with the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center. She is part of the multidisciplinary team that will provide treatment specifically to breast cancer patients. She has also been named a clinical associate professor of surgery with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.
      
Talbert is a board-certified surgeon and has been in practice as a general surgeon with a special interest in breast issues for 22 years. She is a member of the American College of Surgeons. 
      
The Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center building represents the largest public-private biomedical initiative in Oklahoma history. The 210,000 square-foot facility provides patient-center care, offering the most advanced cancer detection and treatment technology, the largest and most experienced group of cancer specialists, a wide array of supportive services and an environment that provides a warm and comforting experience for patients and caregivers. The center is staffed by doctors from OU Physicians, the state's largest physician group working in multidisciplinary teams to provide cancer patients with the highest standard of care while advancing the latest research into the newest treatment options.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1401Mon, 25 Nov 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Pediatric Neurologist Joins OU Children's PhysiciansPediatric neurologist Cherie Herren, M.D., has established her medical practice with OU Children's Physicians. She has also been named an assistant professor with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. Pediatric neurologists diagnose and treat disorders of the central nervous system such as headache, seizures and epilepsy, developmental delay, tics and muscular diseases.
       
Herren is board certified in neurology with a special certification in child neurology. She specializes in the diagnoses and treatment of epilepsy. She completed fellowships in pediatric epilepsy and pediatric neurophysiology at the University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, where she also completed her pediatric neurology residency. She completed a pediatrics residency and earned her medical degree at the OU College of Medicine. 
      
Herren sees patients in the OU Children's Physicians building on the OU Health Sciences Center campus, 1200 Children's Ave. For an appointment with a pediatric neurologist at OU Children's Physicians, call (405) 271-2006.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
Almost 175 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board-certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1400Mon, 25 Nov 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Surgeon Joins OU PhysiciansAllison Murphree, M.D., has established her surgical practice with OU Physicians.  She has also been named a clinical instructor in surgery with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. 
     
 Murphree completed her surgical residency at the OU College of Medicine and earned her medical degree from East Carolina University, Greenville.
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1399Mon, 25 Nov 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Psychologist Joins OU Children's PhysiciansKlanci M. McCabe, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist specializing in pain management, has established her practice with OU Children's Physicians. 
      
McCabe comes to OU Children's Physicians from Tulsa, where she was a practicing pediatric psychologist for the Tulsa Center for Child Psychology and a part-time pediatric psychologist for Saint Francis Children's Hospital.
      
McCabe completed a pediatric psychology postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. She completed a pediatric psychology internship at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. She earned a doctorate and master's degree in clinical psychology from the University of Tulsa. She earned her undergraduate degree in psychology from the University of Oklahoma.
      
McCabe is a member of the American Psychological Association, Society for Pediatric Psychology, American Pain Society and Society for Psychophysiological Research. 
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
More than 175 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1391Wed, 20 Nov 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Anesthesiologist Joins OU Physicians Anesthesiologist Kofi B. Vandyck, M.D., has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. He has also been named an assistant professor of anesthesiology for the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. Anesthesiologists specialize in the use of drugs and other means to avert or reduce pain in patients, especially during surgery. 
      
Vandyck is board certified in anesthesiology. He completed a cardiac anesthesiology fellowship at the Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Richmond, and a clinical anesthesiology fellowship at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston. 
      
Vandyck completed his anesthesiology residency at the University of Maryland College of Medicine, Baltimore. He completed a general surgery internship and earned his medical degree at the University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville.
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1390Wed, 20 Nov 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Adolescent Medicine Chief NamedAmy Middleman, M.D., M.S.Ed., M.P.H., has been named chief of the section of adolescent medicine within the department of pediatrics at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. She will see patients in the OU Children's Physicians Adolescent Medicine Clinic. Adolescent medicine physicians provide comprehensive general health care to adolescents and young adults ages 10 through 23 years of age, including routine wellness checks, sports physicals and immunizations. At OU Children's Physicians, adolescent medicine providers also see patients with more complex issues including eating disorders, young women's health concerns, depression and anxiety and sexuality concerns.
      
Middleman is board certified in pediatrics and adolescent medicine. She came to OU Children's Physicians from Baylor College of Medicine with a goal of establishing an Eating Disorder Program, which will include inpatient and outpatient care.
      
She completed a fellowship in Adolescent Medicine at the Children's Hospital, Harvard University, Boston. She earned a master of public health degree from Harvard School of Public Health and a master of science degree in education at the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education, Philadelphia. 
      
Middleman completed her residency and internship in pediatrics at the Children's Memorial Hospital, Northwestern University, Chicago, after earning a medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.
      
Middleman is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine, North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology and the Society for Pediatric Research. She holds the Children's Medical Research Institute Richard Kasterke/Connie Griggs Chair in Pediatrics.
      
For an appointment with an OU Children's Physicians Adolescent Medicine provider, call (405) 271-6208.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
More than 175 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1389Tue, 19 Nov 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Neurologist Joins OU Physicians Neurologist Shuchi Chaudhary, M.D., has established her medical practice with OU Physicians. Neurologists diagnose and treat disorders of the central nervous system such as headache, seizure, stroke, dementia and Parkinson's disease.
      
Chaudhary specializes in diagnosing and treating stroke patients. She completed a fellowship in vascular neurology at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where she also completed a neurology residency.  She earned her medical degree in New Delhi, India.
      
Chaudhary is a member of the American Heart Association and Huntington Disease Society of America.
      
Chaudhary sees patients on the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center campus as well as at the OU Physicians Edmond clinic. For an appointment in Oklahoma City, call (405) 271-3635. For Edmond appointments, call (405) 340-0551.
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1388Tue, 19 Nov 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Obstetrician-Gynecologist Joins OU Physicians Obstetrician-Gynecologist Gillian Mackay, M.D., has established her practice with OU Physicians. She has also been named an associate professor with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. 
      
Mackay is board certified in obstetrics-gynecology. She has a specific interest in adolescent gynecology, gynecologic surgery and high risk obstetrics. She comes to OU Physicians from Olive View-UCLA Medical Center, Sylmar, Calif., where she was an assistant professor at the David Geffen School of Medicine. Prior to that she was on the staff at Massachusetts General Hospital and a clinical instructor at Harvard Medical School.
      
Mackay completed an obstetrics-gynecology residency at Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston. She earned her medical degree at Royal Free and University College Medical School, London. She also completed a graduate sabbatical at the Institute of Medical Humanities, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston.
      
Mackay is a Fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology.
      
For an appointment with any of the OU Physicians obstetrician-gynecologists, call (405) 271-9494.
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1387Tue, 19 Nov 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Pediatric Dermatologist Joins OU Children's PhysiciansBoard-certified dermatologist Hillary Lawrence, M.D., has established her practice with OU Children's Physicians. She has also been named an assistant professor with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.
      
Lawrence is board certified in dermatology, pediatric dermatology, pediatrics and internal medicine. She completed a fellowship in pediatric dermatology at Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, Mo. She completed her dermatology residency at the University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City and an internal medicine/pediatrics residency at the University of Missouri, Kansas City. She earned her medical degree at the OU College of Medicine.
      
Lawrence is a member of the Society for Pediatric Dermatology and the American Academy of Dermatology.
      
Pediatric dermatology patients are seen at the OU Children's Physicians Building, 1200 Children's Ave., on the OU Health Sciences Center campus. For an appointment, call (405) 271-6110.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
More than 175 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1370Fri, 08 Nov 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Neurosurgeon Joins OU PhysiciansNeurosurgeon Sam Safavi-Abbasi, M.D., has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. Neurosurgeons treat diseases and disorders of the brain, spinal cord and nervous system. 
      
Safavi-Abbasi's clinical interests include diagnosing and treating tumors of the pituitary, facial pain syndromes, cerebrovascular disease, aneurysms and AVMs (when blood vessels in the brain divert blood from the arteries to the veins). 
      
Safavi-Abbasi completed a neurosurgery residency at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and a clinical neurosurgery and skull base surgery residency at the International Neuroscience Institute, Hannover, Germany. He completed a fellowship in skull base anatomy and spinal biomechanics research at Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ, and a graduate research fellowship at the University of Goettingen, Goettingen, Germany.
      
Safavi-Abbasi earned his medical degree at Georg-August University Medical School, Goettingen, Germany.
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1368Fri, 08 Nov 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Unlocking the Mysteries of One of the Deadliest CancersLearning that you have pancreatic cancer is terrible news. It is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, and, for reasons unknown, African-Americans have a 40 to 50 percent increased risk of contracting this cancer. 

Surgery to remove the tumor remains the first line of defense, but the outlook for survival in patients is still bleak. In fact, until recently, chemotherapeutic drugs have had minimal effect on improving patient survival. 

"Only five percent of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer are still living after five years of treatment," said Dr. Courtney Houchen, a physician and researcher with the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.  

Houchen, fellow Cancer Center researcher Sripathi Sureban, Ph.D., and their team of researchers believe their newest discovery my help change that. They have uncovered an important key to unlocking the mysteries surrounding pancreatic cancer, its origin and its spread – a protein called DCLK1 that appears to be an important regulator of the cancer's stem cell biology.

Their latest research shows the protein is involved in the metastasis or spread of cancer to other parts of the body. Previous research had found that DCLK1 also was involved in the genesis of cancer growth.   

"We think this is breakthrough research, because it identifies a potential target molecule that can regulate both the start of the cancer and the spread of the cancer," said Houchen. "We're very excited about this research because it is new. It's a new molecular target; and it may open the door to developing new agents for this terrible disease."

Armed with their findings, Cancer Center researchers hope to develop chemical agents that can "knockdown" the protein. When identified, those agents could ultimately be used in patient clinical trials, but researchers emphasize that much more research must be done first.

Because DCLK1 is a "master regulator" of processes that govern cancer growth, researchers believe knocking it down also may have benefits for patients with colon, prostate, breast and other forms of cancer.

The OUHSC team's work has already captured the attention of other scientific teams, generating new research efforts across the country.

"We are the pioneers. Other researchers are now doing their own work, but they are following our research," Sureban said.

Inspired by the team's research discoveries, Houchen has founded Coare Biotechnology, a company he hopes will develop drugs to successfully combat pancreatic cancer and provide hope to patients diagnosed with it.  

The team's research findings are published online in PLOS One at:

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0073940
 
The research is supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1362Thu, 31 Oct 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Radial Procedure Offers New Options for Oklahoma Heart PatientsImagine having your heart fixed through your wrist. It's not science fiction. It's now a reality at the OU Medical Center in Oklahoma City.

Many heart patients who would traditionally undergo cardiac catheterization or stent procedures through the femoral artery (located in the groin area) are now experiencing shorter recovery times thanks to OU Medicine cardiologists performing the same procedures through the radial (wrist) artery. 

Mazen Abu-Fadel, M.D., director of Interventional Cardiology and the Cardiac Catheterization Lab at OU Medicine, and Beau Hawkins, M.D., an OU Physicians interventional cardiologist are particularly pleased with the results being achieved by procedures utilizing the radial artery. 

Cardiac catheterization is a procedure used to detect and identify cholesterol deposits that block blood flow through the arteries to the heart. Traditional heart catheterizations have relied on use of the femoral artery as a point of entry for the catheter tube. The catheter is inserted, and then guided through the artery to the heart. The procedure is much the same with the radial approach; however, the access point is in the wrist as opposed to the groin.

"While radial artery catheterization has become increasingly utilized in areas around the world, cardiologists in this country continue to use the femoral artery in the overwhelming majority of cases," Hawkins said.

Hawkins said there are benefits to the radial approach. For example, cardiac catheterization from the femoral approach requires the patient to remain stationary for several hours after the procedure in order to minimize the risk of bleeding, while patients who undergo radial artery catheterization are able to move about immediately following the procedure. 

Because the radial artery is only two to three millimeters in size, and due to its location in the wrist, a simple compression wristband can be used after the procedure to avoid bleeding. In contrast, the larger femoral artery in the groin region is more difficult to compress by virtue of its size. The amount of pressure required to avoid bleeding can cause significant discomfort for the patient and bleeding can still occur several hours or days later after an otherwise successful and uncomplicated procedure. 

Hawkins said the advantages of the radial procedure include: 
Shorter recovery time 
Less discomfort 
Less bleeding, thereby minimizing the potential need for blood transfusion and prolonged hospitalization 

New research also suggests using the radial artery may be more cost-effective than the traditional approach. 

"Multiple studies have now demonstrated that radial procedures cost less and consume fewer health care dollars than those performed through the femoral artery. The exact reasons aren't fully understood, but we know that bleeding and vascular complications are expensive to treat and often result in prolonged hospital stays," Hawkins said. "Using the radial artery helps to avoid these events that can drive up health care costs. I think this is especially important, given the heightened financial pressures on our health care system as a whole." 

In addition to identifying blockages in the heart, the radial approach is also an effective technique to open heart blockages using metallic scaffolds called stents. Depending on the clinical circumstances, opening these blockages may alleviate chest pain, improve heart function and prevent future cardiac events from occurring. 

A radial approach is feasible in the vast majority of patients presenting for cardiac catheterization. Its use is especially advantageous in patients who are very obese, as femoral access can be technically challenging and such patients are more prone to bleeding complications. It is also particularly valuable in patients for whom bleeding risk is highest, including patients with bleeding disorders, those with renal dysfunction and those on medications that may promote bleeding. 

OU Medicine is the collective brand for OU Medical Center, OU Physicians and the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. Headquartered at the Oklahoma Health Center campus near downtown Oklahoma City, OU Medicine is the state's largest academic medical complex. Among other things, it provides health care, conducts medical research and educates the physicians of tomorrow.  


About OU Physicians: 
OU Physicians cardiologists see patients on the OU Health Sciences Center campus at 825 N.E. 10th Street, suite 2500, and in Edmond at 14101 N. Eastern. For appointments, call (405) 271-7001 in Oklahoma City or (405) 340-0551 in Edmond.  With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians. 

About OU Medical Center:
OU Medical Center is home to the state's only level one trauma center and The Children's Hospital, Oklahoma's most comprehensive pediatric facility. Members of OU Physicians, the state's largest physicians group, provide care at the hospital facilities and at OU Physicians clinics in Oklahoma City and across the state. The practice includes almost every adult and child specialty, and some of its physicians have pioneered treatments or procedures that are world-firsts.


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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1352Wed, 30 Oct 2013 00:00:00 GMT
OU Pharmacy Team Wins National Competition
A student team representing the University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy earned first place in a national student business plan competition sponsored by the National Community Pharmacists Association.

The OU team bested two other finalists in a live competition this month to win the 2013 Good Neighbor Pharmacy NCPA Pruitt-Schutte Student Business Plan Competition, the first national competition of its kind in the pharmacy profession.

"The impressive performance of the 39 teams that competed in the 2013 contest shows that the future for these prospective independent community pharmacy owners is very bright," said NCPA President Donnie Calhoun, R.Ph., a pharmacy owner in Anniston, Ala. "All of the business plans were well done. The three finalists not only presented excellent written business plans, but followed up with outstanding live presentations. I want to congratulate this year's winning team from the University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy." 

OU College of Pharmacy team includes team captain John Lugafet (Noble); team members Naomi Kozlowski (Tulsa), Renee Andersen (Tulsa) and Tobi Olusola (Tulsa) with college advisers Eric J. Johnson, M.B.A., C.P.A., associate dean for administration and finance, and Justin Wilson, Pharm.D., adjunct professor; and Dean JoLaine R. Draugalis.  

Their chapter received $3,000, and $3,000 was contributed to the school in the dean's name to promote independent pharmacy. The team members, team advisor, and the dean will also receive complimentary registration, travel, and lodging to NCPA's 2014 Multiple Locations Conference.


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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1353Wed, 30 Oct 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Anesthesiologist Joins OU Physicians Anesthesiologist James Brett Hulin, D.O., has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. Anesthesiologists specialize in the use of drugs and other means to avert or reduce pain in patients, especially during surgery.
      
Hulin is board certified in anesthesiology. He served as chief anesthesiology resident at Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine-Scott & White Memorial Hospital. He earned his medical degree at Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Tulsa. He earned a Physician Assistant degree from the University of Oklahoma.
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1351Wed, 30 Oct 2013 00:00:00 GMT
New Facial Aesthetic Services at OU Dentistry - More Than Just a SmileIn addition to helping patients with facial aesthetics by improving smiles, Abbey Onan, D.D.S., is now also offering botulinum toxins and dermal fillers to restore a youthful appearance at OU Dentistry Faculty Practice.

These facial aesthetic procedures are non-surgical treatments that take just minutes, require little to no recovery time and provide noticeable results within hours. The treatments help reduce moderate to severe brow lines and crows feet and smooth wrinkles and folds around the nose and mouth areas. Results may last from four months to up to one year.

OU Dentistry offers a convenient, on-campus location. Appointments are available every Friday afternoon, beginning this week on Oct. 4, and can be scheduled by calling (405) 271-5714.

OU Dentistry is a comprehensive group practice providing dental care for all ages. Services include cleanings, fillings, root canals, crowns, bridges, partials, dentures, implants, veneers and bleaching. OU Dentistry doctors also serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Dentistry. Offices are located on the Health Sciences Center campus in Oklahoma City within the College of Dentistry building, 1201 N. Stonewall Ave.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1326Wed, 09 Oct 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Senator James M. Inhofe Honors Kate C. Arnold, M.D., as an Angel in Adoption™ To Be Recognized at National Event in Washington, D.C.Senator James M. Inhofe has selected Kate C. Arnold, M.D., as a 2013 Angels in Adoption™ awardee for her outstanding advocacy of adoption and foster care issues. The Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute (CCAI), which orchestrates the Angels in Adoption™ program, will honor Dr. Arnold at an awards ceremony on October 8 and gala on October 9 in Washington, D.C. 
 
Dr. Arnold is being honored for adopting three children as a single mom while finishing medical school and starting residency in OBGYN at the University of Oklahoma. 

In 2003, Kate Arnold volunteered at a San Francisco Bay Area home for teenage mothers. While volunteering, Kate met Miriam, a mother to two boys. Over the course of years Kate developed a relationship with Miriam, her boys, and a daughter born during that time. Kate became a constant presence in their lives, frequently taking the children out for the day or overnight. 

In March of 2011, Child Protective Services removed Miriam's children. In October of that year, a social worker asked her to name who her children should go to if she lost them permanently. Miriam named Kate.

At the time Kate was attending Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) in Washington, D.C. However, she immediately petitioned Georgetown for the ability to complete her fourth year of medical school in California so that she could become the children's foster parent and begin adoption proceedings. 

In July 2012, Kate returned to California and by August the children were living with her. This year she graduated from GUMC and the family moved to Oklahoma City, OK, so Kate could begin her residency at the University of Oklahoma.

Kate reflects the goals of CCAI's adoption and foster care work, not only in her decision to foster and adopt but also through her years of prior work and commitment to her surrounding communities, in particular the foster care community. Kate's dedication to her community began in high school and continued during both her undergraduate and medical school years volunteering in both Palo Alto, CA, and Washington, DC, for foster care organizations. Kate is a great example of what one person can do to lift those around her and we believe she will continue to do so.

The Angels in Adoption™ program is CCAI's signature public awareness campaign and provides an opportunity for all members of the U.S. Congress to honor the good work of their constituents who have enriched the lives of foster children and orphans in the United States and abroad.  Each year, more than 140 Angels are honored through the Angels in Adoption™ program.

"The Angels in Adoption™ program is unlike any other program in the Nation's Capital. Because of it, almost 2,000 "Angels' have come to share with Washington their adoption experience and left with a renewed excitement of all that adoption makes possible," said Kathleen Strottman. I learned one simple lesson from my time on Capitol Hill, knowledge is power.  Angels in Adoption™ is meant to give Members of Congress the knowledge they need to use the power they have toward making the dream of a family a reality for every child."  

In addition to the more than 140 local angels from around the country, several "National Angels" will also be recognized at the ceremony and gala for their dedication and commitment nationally and internationally to child welfare on a grand scale.  This year's honorees are Korie and Willie Robertson of the popular A&E reality show Duck Dynasty and internationally acclaimed actress, director and producer Deborra-Lee Furness Jackman. Former National Angels include First Lady Laura Bush, Patti LaBelle, Jane Seymour, Muhammad Ali, the late Dave Thomas, Steven Curtis Chapman, Bruce Willis, Alonzo Mourning, Rhea Perlman and Kristin Chenoweth. 

The Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute (CCAI) is a 501(c)3 nonpartisan organization dedicated to raising awareness about the tens of thousands of orphans and foster children in the United States and the millions of orphans around the world in need of permanent, safe, and loving homes through adoption.  CCAI's goal is the elimination of the barriers that hinder these children from realizing their basic right of a family.  

CCAI was created in 2001 by the active co-chairs of the bicameral, bipartisan Congressional Coalition on Adoption to more effectively raise Congressional and public awareness about adoption.  
The Angels in Adoption™ program was established in 1999 as a Congressional press conference to honor outstanding individuals. Since then, the program has developed into a yearlong public awareness campaign culminating in an extraordinary awards gala and celebration in Washington, DC.  

CCAI does not receive any government funding and relies on the generous support of foundations, corporations, and individuals to accomplish their mission. For more information, visit www.ccainstitute.org or www.angelsinadoption.org.
 

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1322Fri, 04 Oct 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Urology Chair Named at OU College of MedicineMichael S. Cookson, M.D., M.M.H.C., has been named chair of the Department of Urology at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. He has also established a urologic oncology practice working closely with the OU Physicians at the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center. Urology is the surgical specialty dealing with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and disorders of the urinary tract and reproductive organs. 
      
Cookson's practice specializes in the surgical management of urologic cancers including prostate, kidney and bladder cancer. He has specific experience in robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy, open surgery and bladder cancer surgeries including bladder reconstruction.
      
Cookson, who is board certified in urology, comes to OU from Vanderbilt University, Nashville, where he practiced for 15 years and served as vice chairman of the Department of Urologic Surgery. He completed a fellowship in urologic oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York City. He completed a urology residency at the University of Texas at San Antonio.
      
Cookson earned his medical degree at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, after earning a bachelor's degree from OU in Norman. He earned a Master of Management in Health Care degree with honors from Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management.
      
Cookson is a member of the American Urological Association, Society of Urologic Oncology and the Society of Urologic Oncology Fellowship Committee. He is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons and is one of only 75 urologists in the country to be elected to the American Association of Genitourinary Surgeons.
      
Cookson sees urologic cancer patients at the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center, 800 N.E. 10th Street, Oklahoma City. Appointments can be made by calling (405) 271-4088. 
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1319Wed, 02 Oct 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Internal Medicine Specialist Joins OU PhysiciansJason R. Sanders, M.D., M.B.A., an internal medicine specialist, has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. He has also been named Vice Provost for Planning and Administrative Affairs at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.
      
In his internal medicine practice, Sanders provides primary care services for men and women, ages 18 and older. He completed a residency at the Department of Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital. He graduated from Harvard Medical School, and also earned degrees at Harvard Business School, Oxford University and the University of Oklahoma. 
      
For an appointment with an OU Physicians internal medicine specialist, call (405) 271-3445.
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1318Wed, 02 Oct 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Geriatrician Joins OU PhysiciansGeriatrician Bich-Thy Ngo, M.D., has established her medical practice with OU Physicians. Geriatricians provide health care services specific to seniors just as pediatricians specialize in health needs specific to children. 
      
Ngo completed a fellowship in geriatric medicine at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, School of Medicine, Lubbock, where she also completed an internal medicine residency. She earned her medical degree from Texas A&M University, College of Medicine, College Station.
      
Ngo is a member of the American College of Physicians, American Geriatrics Society, American Federation for Medical Research and the American Medical Director Association.
      
In addition to seeing patients, OU Physicians geriatricians at The Donald W. Reynolds Department of Geriatric Medicine at the OU College of Medicine also teach other physicians about specialized care for seniors at the OU College of Medicine. 
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1317Wed, 02 Oct 2013 00:00:00 GMT
New National Leadership Role for OU Public Health Dean The dean of the University of Oklahoma College of Public Health, Gary Raskob, Ph.D., has been selected to chair the National Blood Clot Alliance's Medical and Scientific Advisory Board.

"OU is very fortunate to have Dean Raskob as a leader in our university community," said OU President David L. Boren.

Raskob is a national and international authority in thrombosis. Much of his work includes clinical trials directed at the prevention and treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.  

"The Alliance is fortunate to have this nationally respected research scientist and public health leader at the helm of our Medical and Scientific Advisory Board. He has leadership experience chairing medical and advocacy bodies and will bring great energy and ideas to the work of our advisory body," said NBCA President Joe Isaacs.

"It is my goal to focus on working with Alliance leadership to substantially reduce the number of deaths due to blood clots in America. We have the knowledge and technology. The key to success will be prevention through increased awareness and application among patients, health professionals and the public," said Raskob.

In addition to his role as dean, Raskob is a professor of Epidemiology and Medicine and holds a joint appointment in the OU colleges of Public Health and Medicine. Raskob is also the chair-elect of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health, a national organization of schools and programs accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health. He has authored more than 200 publications on the diagnosis and treatment of thromboembolic disorders.

The National Blood Clot Alliance is a non-profit, voluntary health organization dedicated to advancing the prevention, early diagnosis and successful treatment of life-threatening blood clots such as deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and clot-provoked stroke. 
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1316Wed, 02 Oct 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Developmental/Behavioral Specialist Joins OU Children's PhysiciansAmi B. Bax, M.D. has established her practice with the OU Children's Physicians Child Study Center. She has also been named an assistant professor for the 
Department of Pediatrics Section of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.
      
Bax is board certified in pediatrics and board eligible in developmental and behavioral pediatrics. She sees patients with autism, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), disruptive behaviors and developmental delays.       
        
Bax completed a developmental and behavioral pediatric fellowship at the OU College of Medicine, where she also completed her residency. She earned her medical degree at the OU College of Medicine-Tulsa. She completed her bachelor's degree, graduating summa cum laude from OU in Norman.
      
Bax is a member of the Society of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics and the American Academy of Pediatrics.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
More than 175 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1307Fri, 27 Sep 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Oklahoma Medical Professionals Learn Advanced Hazmat Response and Treatment TechniquesEvery day, hazardous materials are transported by train or truck in Oklahoma and across the country, and the number of these shipments is growing.  According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, 147,760 highway and railway hazardous material (hazmat) incidents occurred nationwide during the past 10 years.  Of those, 1,830 were in Oklahoma.

On Nov. 5 and 6, the Oklahoma Poison Center will offer the Advanced Hazmat Life Support (AHLS™) 
Course to train Oklahoma emergency medical professionals how to provide expert medical care for victims of hazmat incidents and toxic terrorism. This two-day AHLS Provider course, which will be held at the University of Oklahoma-Tulsa Schusterman Center, covers such topics as decontamination, rapid assessment of hazmat-exposed patients, antidotes and drug therapy, and the establishment of response systems in the community.

"Whether from chemical spills or acts of terrorism, the threat of hazmat exposures to people is at an all-time high," says Scott Schaeffer, toxicologist and managing director of the Oklahoma Poison Center.  Medical personnel need specialized knowledge of toxic substances to be able to rapidly assess hazardous materials patients, recognize the symptoms of particular toxic substances and immediately give specific antidotes.

"AHLS not only enables health care professionals to better protect our community, but also to protect our first responders and emergency staff," Schaeffer added.  "This course provides the training needed to be more prepared should a serious incident occur."

AHLS was developed at the Arizona Emergency Medical Research Center, a center of excellence at the University of Arizona College of Medicine, in collaboration with the American Academy of Clinical Toxicology.  More than 13,000 emergency medical professionals are AHLS-verified providers, serving their local communities.  At the completion of this course, 50 new verified providers will be serving Oklahoma.

To register for the course, visit www.ahls.org, and click on "Upcoming Courses" to find the ‘Tulsa, OK' Provider course.

The Oklahoma Poison Control Center, a program of the OU College of Pharmacy at the OU Health Sciences Center, is one of 57 accredited regional poison control centers in the United States.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1308Fri, 27 Sep 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Board-Certified Radiologist Joins OU PhysiciansNatalie McAllister, M.D., a board-certified diagnostic radiologist, has established her medical practice at OU Physicians. Radiologists specialize in administering, supervising and interpreting MRI, CT, x-ray, ultrasound and other types of imaging studies. 
      
McAllister completed a body imaging fellowship at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas. She completed her residency at Integris Baptist Medical Center and an internship at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine where she also earned her medical degree. She also earned a physical therapy degree from the University of Oklahoma College of Allied Health.
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1306Fri, 27 Sep 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Anesthesiologist Joins OU Physicians Anesthesiologist Shawn Vedamani, M.D., has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. Anesthesiologists specialize in the use of drugs and other means to avert or reduce pain in patients, especially during surgery.
      
Vedamani completed an anesthesiology residency at Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, Calif., where he also earned his medical degree.
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1305Fri, 27 Sep 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Neuro-Oncologist Joins Stephenson Cancer Center Neuro-oncologist James D. Battiste, M.D., Ph.D., has established his medical practice with the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center. He has also been named an assistant professor with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. 
      
As a neuro-oncologist, Battiste treats cancers involving the brain and nervous system. 
      
Battiste comes to OU Physicians from the University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, where he was a faculty instructor in the Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics, while completing a neuro-oncology fellowship at the university's Annette Strauss Center for Neuro-Oncology. He also completed a neurology residency and earned his medical degree and a doctorate of philosophy in neuroscience at UT Southwestern. He earned his undergraduate degree from the University of Oklahoma.
      
Neuro-oncology patients are seen at the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center, 800 N.E. 10th Street.
      
The Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center building represents the largest public-private biomedical initiative in Oklahoma history. The 210,000 square-foot facility provides patient-center care, offering the most advanced cancer detection and treatment technology, the largest and most experienced group of cancer specialists, a wide array of supportive services and an environment that provides a warm and comforting experience for patients and caregivers. The center is staffed by doctors from OU Physicians, the state's largest physician group working in multidisciplinary teams to provide cancer patients with the highest standard of care while advancing the latest research into the newest treatment options.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1300Wed, 18 Sep 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Oklahoma Poison Center Cautions Parents to Be On the Lookout for Signs of Drug AbuseWith the start of a new school year comes the promise of new beginnings and adventures.  Unfortunately, for some students, these adventures may include experimentation with drugs.  The Oklahoma Poison Center cautions parents to be on the lookout for changes in their children's behavior or achievement in school that may indicate drug abuse.  Already, the staff at the center is aware of at least one Oklahoma student who experienced life-threatening toxicity from drugs purchased at school.  

Drugs that emerged in 2010 and continue to gain popularity, as well as cause harm, include synthetic marijuana (also known as K2 or Spice) and the stimulants/hallucinogens often referred to as "bath salts."   These drugs often go by other names, and may be packaged in a manner designed to hide the fact that the product is actually a drug.

Synthetic marijuana is often sold labeled as herbal potpourri, when in fact the herbs have been sprayed with a potent chemical intended to mimic the effects of marijuana.  The effects are quite different when compared to marijuana, however; aggression and severe paranoia leading to violent behavior is not uncommon.

The drugs known as "bath salts" are actually stimulants similar to methamphetamine, and they may cause varying degrees of hallucinations.  They may be sold in packaging indicating that the powder inside is an insect repellant, plant food, screen cleaner, toilet deodorizer, or other household product.  As with synthetic marijuana, violent behavior is not unusual, and the user's body temperature may be elevated to a life-threatening degree.

Additionally, these drugs can cause seizures as well as heart problems and severely elevated blood pressure.  Some of the drugs have been known to cause kidney failure as well.  While not every person who abuses them will experience these severe effects, the number of people injured has been so high that medical professionals in Oklahoma and nationwide have raised significant concerns about their continuing popularity.

"I believe we're seeing just the tip of the iceberg," says Scott Schaeffer, Oklahoma Poison Center managing director.  "We continue to receive reports of people abusing these drugs, and there's no end in sight."  Legislation to ban the chemicals has been passed, but the manufacturers attempt to evade the law by making new compounds, which are then released to the public with little or no human testing.

If you have questions about drug abuse or believe a family member is having a reaction to medication, call the Oklahoma Poison Center for more information and treatment advice at 1-800-222-1222. The Poison Help-line is answered 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year by trained specialists. The Oklahoma Poison Center serves as a valuable resource for Oklahomans, providing immediate, free and expert treatment advice, including medication information, when an actual or suspected exposure to poisonous, hazardous or toxic substances occurs.

The Oklahoma Poison Control, a program of the University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy at the OU Health Sciences Center, is one of 57 accredited regional poison control centers in the United States.  

For more information on the Oklahoma Poison Center, to order educational materials or schedule a presentation, please call Shirley Christie at (405) 271-5062.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1299Wed, 18 Sep 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Welcome New Dentists to OU Dentistry Faculty Practice
Christinna Fairchild, DDS, and Curtis Cunningham, DDS, are now providing general dentistry services at OU Dentistry Faculty Practice.

Fairchild earned her Doctor of Dental Surgery from the University of Oklahoma College of Dentistry. Previously, she practiced dentistry for more than 12 years in El Reno. Fairchild has a special interest and experience in prosthodontics: the design, manufacture, and fitting of artificial replacements for teeth. She also sees pediatric patients, ages four and older.

Cunningham earned his Doctor of Dental Surgery from the University of Tennessee. He was in private practice for 39 years before joining OU Dentistry and also has a special interest in prosthodontics and operative dentistry: restoration of parts of the teeth that are defective as a result of disease, trauma or abnormal development. This includes providing fillings, crowns and cosmetic dentistry options.

OU Dentistry is a comprehensive group practice providing dental care for all ages. Services include cleanings, fillings, root canals, crowns (caps), bridges, partials, dentures, implants veneers and bleaching. OU Dentistry doctors also serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Dentistry. Offices are located on the Health Sciences Center campus in Oklahoma City within the College of Dentistry building, 1201 N. Stonewall Avenue.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1298Wed, 18 Sep 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Stephenson Cancer Center Welcomes New Breast Cancer Researcher The Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma welcomes a new breast cancer researcher this month. Takemi Tanaka, Ph.D., will be appointed an Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Cancer Research Scholar at the Center in recognition of the Trust's efforts to reduce the burden of cancer in the state by supporting innovative research. 

Tanaka's work focuses on the development of new and personalized therapeutic approaches for the prevention and treatment breast and other cancers. Her lab is working on development of a novel therapeutic strategy to block the migration of tumor cells in the body. She also has worked on preparing and modifying nanoparticles that can selectively deliver therapeutic agents to cancer cells.

"Dr. Tanaka's focus on developing a personalized medicine approach to inhibit the growth and metastasis of tumor cells in breast and other cancers will greatly enhance our team of drug development researchers. Her expertise in tumor immunology and nanomedicine also will be a tremendous asset to the center," said Dr. Robert Mannel, director of the Stephenson Cancer Center. 

Tanaka will hold an academic appointment in the Department of Pathology at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. Her research has been supported by competitively-awarded grants from the National Cancer Institute, the Department of Defense, the Pennsylvania Breast Cancer Coalition and the American Cancer Society. She brings a grant portfolio of almost $2 million to Oklahoma. 


About the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center

As Oklahoma's only comprehensive academic cancer center, the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma is raising the standard of cancer care in the state through research and education. In partnership with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is decreasing the burden of cancer in Oklahoma by supporting innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research. The Cancer Center has over 150 research members who are conducting more than 100 cancer research projects at institutions across the state. This research is supported by more than $25 million in annual funding from sponsors that include the National Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society.  For additional information, please visit www.StephensonCancerCenter.org.
 
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1289Thu, 12 Sep 2013 00:00:00 GMT
New Research Recruits Bring $7.7 Million to Cancer CenterRecruiting is often critical to building a winning team in sports, and it is the same in research.  While attracting the best athletes usually costs professional sports teams millions, the recruitment of three top scientists by the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center is actually bringing $7.7 million in new research funding to the campus and potentially millions more to the state's economy.

Three scientists – Pryabata Mukherjee, Ph.D., Reshem Bhattacharya, Ph.D., and Takemi Tanaka, Ph.D. – joined the Cancer Center's team of researchers in the past few weeks, bringing with them promising research in the fight against cancer as well as substantial out-of-state funding.

"The recruitment of top researchers to the University in recent years is a tribute to the caliber of our team and of our Cancer Center," OU President David L. Boren said.  "It indicates our cancer scientists are nationally recognized by their peers for superior research. The additional $7.7 million in research support these researchers bring to OU adds significantly to our cancer grant funding." 

OU Health Sciences Center Vice President for Research John Iandolo, Ph.D., said it's estimated that for every dollar in sponsored research another $2.30 is generated in the local economy.  That happens because new, nationally-funded scientists bring their grants with them, which provide salaries for research staff members who accompany them to OU.  In addition, the grants provide new job opportunities locally as researchers hire additional help. 

"The new people coming into the community need places to live. The homes they purchase or lease contribute dollars to the real estate market," Iandolo said. "These new people also spend money in the community for food and daily living necessities, which contributes to the local economy and brings more sales tax revenues to the state."

So $7.7 million in new research funding can translate into $17.7 million in additional money for the state economy. 

"The fact that we can attract top-notch, well-funded researchers to the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center speaks highly of the esteem with which our existing colleagues are held," Iandolo said. "It takes an existing critical mass of well-known and respected investigators to attract new scientists. Moreover, it is important that the facilities available on campus are state-of-the-art, providing the venue to conduct cutting-edge research."

Enhancements in the OUHSC's research and research support facilities and technology over the past decade help make the campus a very desirable place for researchers to advance their work. Iandolo said when you couple all of that with the benefits of the local community, which has all of the advantages and none of the disadvantages of larger cities, the Cancer Center and the entire OU Health Sciences Center are increasingly attractive to top scientists.

Mukherjee, a researcher whose work focuses on nanotechnology applications in cancer drug development, brings with him more than $3 million in National Cancer Institute research funding. He also holds the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Chair in Cancer Laboratory Research, one of four endowed chairs funded by the Stephenson's gift to support the recruitment of outstanding cancer researchers to Oklahoma.   

With funding from the National Cancer Institute and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Bhattacharya brings with her a total research grant portfolio of more than $2.7 million to Oklahoma. Her work focuses on drug development targets for ovarian cancer.

Tanaka, whose work focuses on the development of new and personalized therapeutic approaches for the prevention and treatment of breast and other cancers, brings with her a grant portfolio totaling almost $2 million. 

All three of the researchers will be appointed Oklahoma TSET Cancer Research Scholars in recognition of the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust's efforts to reduce the burden of cancer in the state through support of innovative research.

"These researchers bring with them a wealth of knowledge, innovation and experience to the Stephenson Cancer Center, as well as significant funding," said Dr. Robert Mannel, director of the Cancer Center. "Their work is critical to efforts to find new and innovative ways to treat and prevent cancer but their funding is also important for the Center as we work toward NCI Cancer Center designation. At the same time, their recruitment to Oklahoma provides a potential boost to the state's economy as well. It is truly a win-win for our state."
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1288Tue, 10 Sep 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Board-Certified Neurologist Joins OU PhysiciansBappaditya Ray, M.D., a board-certified neurologist and board-eligible neurointensivist, has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. Neurointensivists diagnose and treat life-threatening disorders of the central nervous system such as stroke, brain hemorrhages, severe seizures, traumatic brain injuries and spinal cord injuries.
      
Ray comes to OU Physicians from the University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, where he completed a fellowship in neurocritical care. He completed a neurology residency at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock. Previously, Ray was a research scholar in anatomy and completed an anatomy residency at All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. He earned his medical degree at the University of Calcutta, India.
      
Ray has published articles in peer-reviewed journals, including Hearing Research, Clinical Anatomy, Annals of Anatomy, Neurocritical Care, Clinical Neurology & Neurosurgery and has pending publications in Critical Care and Journal of Neurosurgery
      
For an appointment with an OU Physicians neurologist, call (405) 271-3635.
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1282Fri, 06 Sep 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Pediatric Surgeon Joins OU Physicians Alejandro Ruiz-Elizalde, M.D., a board-certified surgeon, has established his practice with OU Children's Physicians.  
      
Ruiz-Elizalde completed a pediatric surgery fellowship at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. He completed a residency at Columbia University, New York, N.Y., where he also earned his medical degree. He also completed a research fellowship at Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital of New York. 
      
Ruiz-Elizalde is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Pediatric Surgical Association.
      
He sees patients at the OU Children's Physicians building, 1200 Children's Ave., Suite 2700. For an appointment, call (405) 271-4357.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
More than 175 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1283Fri, 06 Sep 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Pediatric Critical Care Specialist Joins OU Children's PhysiciansOklahoma native Courtney D. Ranallo, M.D., a pediatric critical care specialist, has established her medical practice with OU Children's Physicians.
     
Ranallo is specifically interested in respiratory physiology, mechanical ventilation and ICU-related sleep disturbances. She is board certified in pediatrics and board eligible in pediatric critical care. 
     
Ranallo completed a critical care fellowship at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, where she also completed a pediatric residency. She earned her medical degree from the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, after graduating summa cum laude from OU with a bachelor's degree in zoology.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
More than 175 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1281Fri, 06 Sep 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Pediatrician Joins OU Children's PhysiciansBoard-certified pediatrician Kathleen Combs, M.D., has established her medical practice with OU Children's Physicians. 
      
Combs was previously a practicing pediatrician in Yukon. She completed her pediatric residency at the  University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where she also earned her medical degree.

Combs is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics.
      
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty. 
      
More than 175 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1277Thu, 05 Sep 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Thoracic Surgical Oncologist Joins Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer CenterSubrato J. Deb, M.D., a thoracic surgical oncologist, has established his surgical practice with the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center. He has also been named an associate professor of surgery with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. Thoracic surgeons treat all conditions of the chest affecting the lungs, esophagus, heart, chest wall, mediastinum and diaphragm. 
      
Deb is board certified in general surgery and thoracic surgery. He specializes in the minimally invasive surgical treatment of all benign and malignant conditions of the chest and the surgical treatment of complex cancers of the thorax. 
      
Deb comes to the Cancer Center from Maryland, where he has been practicing for 10 years. He completed his residency in thoracic surgery at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., and his general surgery training at the National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Md. He earned his medical degree with honors from the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, where he was elected to Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society and received the Virchow Research Award in pathology.
      
Deb is a retired Naval surgeon, having served in several conflicts, most recently as a surgeon in Iraq.
      
He is a member of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and a Fellow of the American College of Chest Physicians, American College of Surgeons and the Society of Surgical Oncologists.
      
The Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center building represents the largest public-private biomedical initiative in Oklahoma history. The 210,000 square-foot facility provides patient-center care, offering the most advanced cancer detection and treatment technology, the largest and most experienced group of cancer specialists, a wide array of supportive services and an environment that provides a warm and comforting experience for patients and caregivers. The center is staffed by doctors from OU Physicians, the state's largest physician group working in multidisciplinary teams to provide cancer patients with the highest standard of care while advancing the latest research into the newest treatment options.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1275Thu, 05 Sep 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Rheumatologist Joins OU PhysiciansRheumatologist Samera Vaseer, M.D., has established her medical practice with OU Physicians. Rheumatologists diagnose and treat autoimmune and inflammatory conditions of joints and connective tissues.
      
Vaseer is specifically interested in diagnosing and treating patients with scleroderma, vasculitis, lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. She completed a rheumatology fellowship at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. She completed her internal medicine residency and internship at State University of New York/Long Island College Hospital, Brooklyn and earned her medical degree at King Edward Medical University, Lahore, Pakistan.
      
She is a member of the American College of Rheumatology.
      
Vaseer sees patients in the OU Physicians Building, 825 N.E. 10th Street, Suite 4300. For appointments with an OU Physicians rheumatologist, call (405) 271-8478. 
      
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
      
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1274Thu, 05 Sep 2013 00:00:00 GMT
To Test Or Not To Test Research at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center points to the need for changes in the way children with certain skin infections are tested.

The research focused on blood tests related to skin and soft tissue infections, commonly known by the acronym SSTIs.  These include infections such as cellulitis and abscesses.

Cellulitis is a skin infection caused by bacteria that typically get into the skin through a cut, sore or insect bite and then spread to deeper tissues. Abscesses are caused by an accumulation of white blood cells and other inflammatory cells within the skin, usually in response to a bacterial infection. This can occur when minor breaks or punctures in the skin provide an entry for bacteria. In both instances, the infection can spread to the blood or lymph nodes if not properly treated.

"These infections are very common in children," said Dr. Jay R. Malone of the OU College of Medicine's Department of Pediatrics, one of the study's lead researchers.

In fact, Malone said SSTIs are seen in one in every 150 pediatric emergency room cases. Children with an SSTI are typically found to have red, hot and painful areas on their skin, especially on the arms, legs, and buttocks.

Because the bacterium that causes SSTI in children can spread to the blood and cause serious blood infections, many doctors routinely order a blood sample to test for the bacterium in the blood.

The OU team set out to determine whether those routine blood tests are really necessary.

"We reviewed the medical records of nearly 600 children treated for SSTI to determine if these children really were at risk for a blood stream infection," Malone said. "We found that the majority of children with SSTIs are at extremely low risk for blood stream infection; and  that checking for a blood stream infection may unnecessarily keep children in the hospital longer as clinicians wait for test results."

As a result of their study, Dr. Malone and his team recommend that children with an uncomplicated SSTI not be tested for potential blood stream infection.

However, researchers said blood tests are still warranted for children with SSTIs who also have certain other risk factors. These include children with an infected surgical incision site, a traumatic wound, or an infected ulcer or burn. Malone said these children are at elevated risk for dangerous and potentially fatal infections of the blood streams and should be tested.

Malone believes the OU team's research sheds important light on when to utilize blood tests with children with SSTIs and when they are not necessary.

"The medical community is increasingly interested in identifying ways to deliver the best care in a cost-effective manner," he said, adding their research provides the evidence to help do just that when it comes to SSTIs.

The research findings and the team's recommendations were published this month in the journal Pediatrics.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1269Wed, 04 Sep 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Board-Certified Pediatric Cardiologist Joins OU Children's Physicians Arshid Mir, M.D., a board-certified pediatric cardiologist, has joined the staff of OU Children's Physicians.
     
Mir practices general pediatric cardiology with a specific interest in advanced imaging (transthoracic, trans esophageal and 3D echocardiography). He also performs fetal echocardiogram and cardiac MRI.
     
He completed an advanced imaging fellowship in pediatric cardiology at Children's Medical Center, Dallas, and a pediatric cardiology fellowship at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas. He completed pediatric residencies at St John Hospital and Medical Center, Detroit, and Government Hospital for Children, India.
     
Mir is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics, American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association.
     
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty.
     
More than 175 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts.
     
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1259Tue, 27 Aug 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Women's Health Physical Therapist Joins OU PhysiciansOKLAHOMA CITY – LaTonya P. Mister, D.P.T., a physical therapist specializing in pelvic and bladder health, has established her practice with OU Physicians.

Mister was previously a practicing physical therapist in Georgia. She earned a doctorate in physical therapy from the University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, after graduating magna cum laude with a bachelor of science degree in education from Mississippi State University.

Mister is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA)and a member of the APTA's section on women's health.

For an appointment with an OU Physicians&rsquo Women&rsquos Health physical therapist, call (405) 271-9493.

With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state&rsquos largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts.

OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region&rsquos future physicians.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1258Fri, 23 Aug 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Neurologist Joins OU PhysiciansOklahoma City Neurologist J. Vaughn, M.D., has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. He has also been named an assistant professor with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.

Neurologists diagnose and treat disorders of the central nervous system such as headache, seizure, stroke, dementia and Parkinson’s disease. Vaughn has a specific interest in diagnosing and treating cerebrovascular disease, multiple sclerosis and demyelinating disorders.

Vaughn completed a neurology residency and internship at the OU College of Medicine and served as administrative chief resident of neurology. He also earned his medical degree from the OU College of Medicine after earning a bachelor of science degree in microbiology at OU in Norman.

Vaughn is a member of the American Academy of Neurology.

For an appointment with an OU Physicians neurologist, call (405) 271-3635.

With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state’s largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts.

OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region’s future physicians.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1257Thu, 22 Aug 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Pelvic and Bladder Health Specialist Joins OU PhysiciansDena White, M.D., a pelvic and bladder health specialist (urogynecologist), has established her practice with OU Physicians.
    
White specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders affecting the female pelvic floor (bladder, bowel and reproductive organs). She has specific experience diagnosing and treating pelvic organ prolapse (weakness of female reproductive organs), pelvic floor reconstruction, urinary incontinence and voiding dysfunction (difficulty emptying the bladder).
     
White completed a fellowship in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. She completed residency in obstetrics and gynecology at John Peter Smith Hospital, Fort Worth. She earned her medical degree at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston and earned a master's degree in clinical and translational sciences at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.
     
White is a member of the American Urogynecologic Society and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.
     
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts.
     
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1256Thu, 22 Aug 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Clinical trial at Stephenson Cancer Center to test OMRF brain cancer drugScientists at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation have developed an experimental treatment for glioblastoma, a deadly form of brain cancer, and beginning this month, the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center will be conducting a clinical trial to test the novel therapy in eligible patients who suffer from the disease.

This marks the first time OMRF and the new Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma have collaborated on a Phase I Clinical Trial.

"The new joint project is an exciting example of what we can accomplish when we pool the efforts of experts of great stature who live in Oklahoma," said OU President David L. Boren.

Glioblastoma is the most common form of primary brain tumor and one of the most aggressive. As the tumors expand, wrapping around critical nerves and blood vessels, they cause a number of symptoms—headache, seizures, nausea, memory loss and more. Eventually, the tumors grow so large they cause massive pressure within the skull or accumulations of water on the brain called edemas. Both can be fatal.

According to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 23,130 people in the United States will be diagnosed with brain and other nervous system cancers in 2013, and more than 14,000 people will die from these forms of cancer. Glioblastoma accounts for about 15 percent of these incidence and mortality statistics.  Standard treatment for the illness usually includes surgery to remove as much of the tumor as possible, followed by radiation and chemotherapy to shrink the portions of the tumor that remain.

"Currently, there's no cure for glioblastoma," said OMRF scientist Rheal Towner, Ph.D. "Without the usual treatments, patients live about three months after diagnosis. Even with treatment, most live little more than a year."

Working with fellow OMRF researcher Robert Floyd, Ph.D., Towner developed an experimental treatment for the cancer. In laboratory studies, Floyd and Towner administered the drug, known as OKN-007, to laboratory models with glioblastomas. Tumor size was reduced and lifespan was longer with the treatment.

Using this experimental data, as well as safety data obtained when the compound was previously tested in people who had suffered strokes, OMRF has received approval from the Food and Drug Administration to begin testing OKN-007 in glioblastoma patients.

The clinical trial is designed for glioblastoma patients who have recurring tumors following standard therapies. The initial phase of the trial is focused on assessing the safety and dosage levels of OKN-007. If successful, the trial would progress to subsequent stages to study the efficacy and safety of the investigational drug in larger patient populations.

"The Stephenson Cancer Center is proud to work with OMRF to bring this promising experimental drug to patients with this deadly form of cancer," said SCC Director Robert Mannel, M.D., "This represents a unique collaboration that unites local innovation and our Phase I Clinical Trials Program. Through participation in this clinical trial, patients can take an active role in fighting their cancer and hopefully improving outcomes for patients everywhere."

In the past five years, more than 500 cancer patients have participated in early-stage experimental drug trials through the Oklahoma TSET Phase I Program at the Stephenson Cancer Center.  The program currently ranks among the top 10 early-stage clinical trials programs nationally for patient enrollment.

"The current treatments for glioblastoma have substantial side effects and complications, and they don't provide ideal outcomes for patients," said OMRF President Stephen Prescott, M.D. "There is a desperate need for more effective therapies, and we're excited to see our investigational drug entering human trials. The ultimate goal is to save lives."

To find out more about this clinical trial, including the eligibility criteria for participation, please call the Stephenson Cancer Center toll free 1-855-750-CARE (2273)

In addition to the Stephenson Cancer Center, the investigational drug OKN-007 also is being tested in patients receiving treatment at the University of Utah's Huntsman Cancer Institute.


About OMRF
OMRF (omrf.org) is an independent, nonprofit biomedical research institute dedicated to understanding and developing more effective treatments for human diseases. Its scientists focus on such critical research areas as cancer, lupus and cardiovascular disease.


About the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center
As Oklahoma's only comprehensive academic cancer center, the Stephenson Cancer Center (StephensonCancerCenter.org) at the University of Oklahoma is raising the standard of cancer care in the state through research and education. In partnership with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is decreasing the burden of cancer in Oklahoma by supporting innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research. The Cancer Center has over 150 research members who are conducting more than 100 cancer research projects at institutions across the state. This research is supported by more than $25 million in annual funding from sponsors that include the National Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1244Thursday, August 14, 2013
Young Cancer Patients Hope to Brighten the World of Artist Who Brightened TheirsElijah Watson, 5, presents a gift of art from him and fellow cancer patients to Oklahoma artist Bob Palmer.  
Palmer donated his time and talents to create the beautiful 35-foot-long mural seen behind the pair. The mural adorns an entire wall within the infusion center at the Jimmy Everest Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders in Children at OU Medicine.  

Children from the Center decorated the mat that surrounds a photo of Palmer's mural. Their fingerprints are featured in that artwork.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1238Wed, 14 Aug 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Clinical trial at OU's Stephenson Cancer Center to test OMRF drug that targets deadly cancerIt is a common and aggressive form of brain cancer – glioblastoma. Even with standard treatment, most patients live little more than a year. Now, researchers hope a new treatment developed right here in Oklahoma may help more patients survive this deadly cancer.
 
An experimental treatment for glioblastoma, developed by scientists at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, will be the focus of a new clinical trial at the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma starting this month.
 
This Wednesday, August 7th at 11 a.m., physician-researchers from the Stephenson Cancer Center and scientists from OMRF will share details about this important new Phase I clinical trial, the investigational drug it tests and how patients can learn more about participating
 
What: Media Briefing
 
When: 11 a.m., Wednesday, August 7, 2013
 
Where: Stephenson Cancer Center, 5th Floor
 
Who:  Rheal Towner, Ph.D.
          OMRF Scientist

          Scott McMeekin, M.D.
          Deputy Director of Clinical Research, Stephenson Cancer Center

          Stephen Prescott, M.D.
          President, OMRF
 
Pool camera footage of the OMRF labs where the treatment was developed is available here.
 
Also, a live stream of the media briefing can be viewed at: http://www.universityhospitalsauthority.com/streaming/viewer/
 
Media Parking is available in the Cancer Center garage or you may use valet parking available at the front of the Cancer Center.
 
Questions, contact: Theresa Green at (405) 833-9824 or theresa-green@ouhsc.edu
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1229Wed, 07 Aug 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Ovarian Cancer Researcher Joins Cancer CenterResham Bhattacharya, Ph.D., a researcher whose work focuses on drug development targets for ovarian cancer, has joined the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center. She brings a total grant portfolio of more than $2 million in out-of-state funding to Oklahoma.
 
Ovarian cancer claims the lives of more than 15,000 women annually in the United States, according to the American Cancer Society. Its overall survival rate is just 43 percent because it is typically not diagnosed until the disease is at an advanced stage.
 
Bhattacharya's research focuses on oncogenes, a class of genes linked to the development of tumors. Normal tissue cells are genetically programmed to divide, develop and die in a regular cycle. Active oncogenes can disrupt this normal cycle by causing cells to survive and proliferate, leading to the development and spread of tumor cells.
 
Bhattacharya's work aims to learn exactly how oncogenes function in the development of ovarian cancer. She also is working to identify molecular mechanisms that can silence these oncogenes, leading to possible targets for drug development. Additionally, her lab is evaluating the potential use of nanoparticles to target and kill ovarian cancer cells in conjunction with more traditional forms of chemotherapy.   
 
"Dr. Bhattacharya is a great addition to the Stephenson Cancer Center, and we are very pleased to welcome her to Oklahoma. Her expertise significantly enhances a number of research projects currently underway, and she will be a terrific colleague and collaborator," said Dr. Robert Mannel, director of the Cancer Center.  
 
Bhattacharya will be appointed an Oklahoma TSET Cancer Research Scholar in recognition of the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust's efforts to reduce the burden of cancer in the state by supporting innovative research. She joins a team of cancer investigators who are already nationally recognized for conducting outstanding clinical research in the area of gynecologic cancers.  

Bhattacharya comes to Oklahoma from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. At the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, she will hold appointments in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and in the cancer center's Gynecologic Cancers Research Program.     
 
Bhattacharya's research is currently funded by grants from the National Cancer Institute and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.
 

About the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center
As Oklahoma's only comprehensive academic cancer center, the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma is raising the standard of cancer care in the state through research and education. In partnership with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is decreasing the burden of cancer in Oklahoma by supporting innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research. The Cancer Center has over 150 research members who are conducting more than 100 cancer research projects at institutions across the state. This research is supported by more than $25 million in annual funding from sponsors that include the National Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society. 
For additional information, please visit
www.StephensonCancerCenter.org.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1228Tue, 06 Aug 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Otolaryngologist Joins OU Children's Physicians Christopher F. Barañano, M.D., F.A.A.P., a board-certified and fellowship-trained otolaryngologist, has established his practice with OU Children's Physicians.
     
Otolaryngologists/head and neck surgeons treat patients for conditions relating to the ear, nose and throat. Barañano specializes in cochlear implantation and the surgical management of chronic ear disease in children. He also treats vascular malformation and other head and neck tumors in children.
     
Barañano completed a pediatric fellowship at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinic, Iowa City. He completed his residency in otolaryngology/head and neck surgery and earned his medical degree at the University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham. He has presented research at national meetings on the management of cochlear implant candidates with recurrent ear infections.
     
Barañano is a member of the American Academy of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, American College of Surgeons, American Academy of Pediatrics, American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology and Interamerican Association of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology.   
       
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty.
     
More than 175 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts.
     
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1227Tue, 06 Aug 2013 00:00:00 GMT
How Healthy is Your Day Care?What role can day cares play in improving the health of children in Oklahoma? How healthy are the meals they serve? Are children getting enough physical activity while in day care?

Research out of the University of Oklahoma College of Allied Health provides some important insights to these and other questions.

All state-licensed child care centers are required to meet existing regulations related to the safety of the food they serve and play equipment, but few regulations exist regarding health and obesity prevention, said Susan Sisson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the college's Department of Nutritional Sciences at the OU Health Sciences Center.

"Understanding what regulations do exist and where those can be improved can likely help reduce and prevent the high levels of overweight and obesity in preschool children in our state," she said.

Sisson said 31 percent of low-income preschoolers in Oklahoma are overweight or obese, and many of these children spend at least a part of their days in child care.

It's estimated that about six in ten children in this country spend time in child care facilities from infancy to six years of age.

To learn more about existing nutritional and physical activity policies and practices at state-licensed child care centers in Oklahoma, Sisson surveyed hundreds of child care directors seeking insights and information. Surveys were mailed to the directors of 703 child care centers; 314 of those were completed and mailed back.

The survey asked 57 questions in all. About two-thirds of those questions focused on nutrition and the other third on physical activity.

"We wanted to find out what was occurring in their facility," Sisson said. "How often were the kids going outside? What kinds of foods were they served?"

Overall, researchers found the centers reported some good practices when it came to nutrition. Fruit was served daily by 76 percent of the centers responding; 71 percent served non-fried vegetables daily; and virtually all (92%) rarely or never served sugary drinks to the children for whom they cared.

While those statistics are encouraging, Sisson said there is still room for improvement.

"I think centers can certainly improve in decreasing the amount of fruit juice that's served, and increasing the amount of vegetables, other than potatoes and corn, served," she said.

To boost the nutrition in the meals served, Sisson would like to see centers add nutrient-rich vegetables like asparagus, peppers, broccoli and cauliflower to their menus.

Responses about physical activity also revealed room for improvement. For example, 95 percent of the centers responding to the survey reported providing outdoor play opportunities at least once a day. However, Sisson said the overall amount of time spent outdoors and in active play was inadequate.

In addition, and perhaps most important of all, Sisson said the survey reveals that it is vital for childcare centers and their teachers to create an environment that supports healthy weight in children.

Because the surveys provide only self-reported information from childcare directors in Oklahoma, Sisson points out there is an ongoing need for on-site observation to truly know how Oklahoma daycares rate when it comes to exercise and nutrition. Sisson and her team have already visited about 20 Oklahoma centers to make onsite assessments.

The survey results were published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Although Sisson has no specific recommendations at this time, noting that further research is needed, she said the survey results are already stimulating discussion among daycare providers and policy makers.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1226Mon, 05 Aug 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Pediatrician Joins OU Children's PhysiciansPediatrician Mary Ellen Stockett, M.D., has established her medical practice with OU Children's Physicians.
     
Stockett is board certified in pediatrics and child abuse pediatrics. She comes to OU Children's Physicians after practicing community pediatrics in Melbourne, Fla., for the past 15 years. She completed her pediatric residency at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where she also earned her medical degree. She earned her undergraduate degree from Oklahoma State University.
     
Stockett is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children.
     
Stockett is seeing patients at OU Children's Physicians Grand Prairie Pediatrics, located at 7301 N. Comanche Ave., Oklahoma City. For appointments, call (405) 271-4646. She will also be seeing patients at OU Children's Physicians Southwest Pediatrics, 1601 S.W. 89th St., Oklahoma City. For appointments at this location, call (405) 682-4489.
     
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty.
     
More than 175 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts.
     
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1225Mon, 05 Aug 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Another Diabetes? Yes, there is!Once, there were two types of diabetes. Most are familiar with type 1, formerly known as juvenile diabetes; and with type 2, which until recently generally only occurred in adults. However, a Norman man is getting a real life lesson about a form of diabetes that is neither type 1 nor type 2, but instead a little of both.
 
It's called Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults or LADA. People with LADA show signs of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and it is often misdiagnosed as type 2.
 
Nathan Mobley, 35, of Norman doesn't look like the typical adult who might get diabetes. Quite thin and very health conscious, he first attributed his constant thirst and frequent urination to the dry weather.
 
"Also, I was feeling really tired a lot," said Mobley, "even though I was making a point of getting more sleep. I was so tired that I was taking naps during the weekend."
 
When the symptoms persisted, he decided to see his doctor.
 
"My general practitioner, at first, thought it was type 2. I think because of my age, but then later thought it might be type 1. Even then, though, he wasn't sure. So he referred me to the Harold Hamm Diabetes Center," Mobley said.
 
Dr. James Lane, an endocrinologist with the Harold Hamm Diabetes Center at the University of Oklahoma, ordered blood tests to measure both autoantibodies and insulin production. The results were convincing. Mobley had, not type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but instead type 1.5 - LADA.
 
Some believe LADA is actually a slower developing form of type 1 diabetes because patients like Mobley have the same antibodies that target and destroy the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas.
 
"Most people with LADA still produce their own insulin when first diagnosed, like those with type 2 diabetes. However, as LADA progresses, the beta cells of the patient's pancreas may no longer make insulin because their own immune system has destroyed them as in type 1 diabetes," said Lane.
 
In the early stages, patients with LADA do not typically require insulin. Instead, they control their blood glucose (sugar) levels with meal planning, physical activity and oral diabetes medication.
 
"I was always careful to make sure I didn't get too much sugar, didn't eat candy or sweets or drink soda. But now, I am much more aware of my overall nutrition – carbs, fats and protein," Mobley said. "Also, I was always pretty active, but now I do more focused exercise."
 
In addition, Mobley takes the oral medication metformin.  The decision to take medication was not easy for Mobley because of his religious beliefs. He didn't even like to take pain medication, but he has learned that because of LADA, his body can't do it alone. He now uses the oral medication only when absolutely necessary.
 
Lane said that for most with LADA, insulin generally becomes essential to control blood glucose levels. Usually, this is several years after diagnosis.
 
Interestingly, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases reports researchers estimate that as many as 10 percent of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes have LADA.  However, it may not be necessary to test all individuals with type 2 diabetes for LADA.
 
"It really depends upon each patient," Lane said. "For instance, it may not make sense to test in an extremely obese individual because the treatment for LADA would be much the same as the treatment for type 2 diabetes. However, in someone who is very lean and physically active like Mr. Mobley, the testing can help us better tailor treatment."
 
A 2008 Japanese study found that early treatment with insulin for patients with LADA may help them avoid total dependence on insulin longer better than oral medications.  Mobley hopes to delay taking insulin as long as possible.
 
"Apparently, there will be a day when my insulin production cells have all been destroyed and I will have to take artificial insulin, but I am waiting as long as I can," he said.
 
The NIDDK points out another possible benefit to testing all patients for LADA is that medicines that are currently being developed to prevent or cure type 1 diabetes may also be effective against LADA.
 
"The ultimate goal would be to have a medication that would alter the underlying disease process," Lane said. "If we could do that – find a way to halt the destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells or to simply protect them – that would really be something. Of course, because there is some insulin-resistance as well with LADA, it provides unique challenges when aiming for a cure."
 
 
The Harold Hamm Diabetes Center at the University of Oklahoma is a world leader in eradicating diabetes through innovative research focused on progress toward a cure, dramatically improved patient care, and strategies aimed at the prevention of diabetes.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1222Fri, 02 Aug 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Nano-Medicine Researcher Joins Cancer CenterPriyabrata Mukherjee, PhD, a researcher whose work focuses on nanotechnology applications in cancer drug development, has joined the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center.
 
Mukherjee brings with him more than $3 million in National Cancer Institute research funding. He will collaborate with biomedical researchers at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and nanotechnology investigators at OU Norman to develop nano-based applications for cancer drug development and delivery. 
 
Mukherjee will be appointed an Oklahoma TSET Cancer Research Scholar in recognition of the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust's efforts to reduce the burden of cancer in the state by supporting innovative research. He will also hold the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Chair in Cancer Laboratory Research, one of four endowed chairs funded by the Stephenson's gift to support the recruitment of outstanding cancer researchers to Oklahoma.  
 
Mukherjee's research focuses on several related areas. His lab has done important work in developing and optimizing gold nanoparticle-based targeted drug delivery systems for the treatment of lung, pancreas and ovarian cancers. Some inorganic nano-materials also display properties that can inhibit the growth of tumor cells, and Mukherjee's lab is working to better understand these properties and how they might be used to stop tumor cells from growing. His lab also focuses on developing nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems that can overcome the drug resistance that can result from the use of traditional chemotherapy agents.   
 
"Dr. Mukherjee's focus on nanoparticles and their potential applications in cancer drug delivery will be a welcome addition to the Stephenson Cancer Center," said Dr. Robert Mannel, director of the Cancer Center. "He will be a key collaborator for OU Health Sciences Center researchers and a great resource for OU Norman nanotechnology researchers seeking to extend their research to biomedical applications." 
 
Mukherjee will hold appointments in the OU College of Medicine's Department of Pathology and in the Cancer Center's Experimental Therapeutics Research Program. He comes to Oklahoma from the Mayo Clinic, where he was an associate professor of Biomedical Engineering.
 

About the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center
As Oklahoma's only comprehensive academic cancer center, the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma is raising the standard of cancer care in the state through research and education. In partnership with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is decreasing the burden of cancer in Oklahoma by supporting innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research. The Cancer Center has over 150 research members who are conducting more than 100 cancer research projects at institutions across the state. This research is supported by more than $25 million in annual funding from sponsors that include the National Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society. 
 
For additional information, please visit www.StephensonCancerCenter.org.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1224Fri, 02 Aug 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Pathologist Joins OU PhysiciansPathologist Mark Laudenschlager, M.D., has established his practice with OU Physicians. He is also a clinical instructor with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.
     
Laudenschlager completed a breast pathology fellowship at the University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville. He completed a surgical pathology fellowship at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. He completed his residency in anatomic/clinical pathology at Sanford School of Medicine, at the University of South Dakota, Sioux Falls, where he also served as chief resident and earned his medical degree.
     
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts.
     
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1221Fri, 02 Aug 2013 00:00:00 GMT
OU Medicine Live Chat: Kids Summer Shape Up

Exercise physiologist and Associate Professor of Medicine at OU Children's and Harold Hamm Diabetes Center, Dr. Kevin Short addresses the impact of exercise on diabetes prevention and treatment in children and young adults by researching the role of physical activity and diet in the metabolism of glucose and protein and the function of skeletal muscle in insulin resistance.  Dr. Short's webchat will focus on how children and adults can continue to stay active even during the summer months. He'll discuss why it's important to keep moving to prevent diabetes and why exercise acts as medicine for those at risk of developing diabetes.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1220Wed, 31 Jul 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Audiologist Joins OU PhysiciansAudiologist Cynthia See, Au.D., has established her practice with OU Physicians.
     
See comes to OU Children's Physicians from Marshfield, WI, where she was in private practice as an audiologist. She earned her doctorate in audiology at Arizona School of Health Sciences, Mesa, and a master of science in audiology at the University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh.
     
See is a member of the American Academy of Audiology and the American Speech Language Hearing Association.
     
See will see patients at OU Children's Physicians, 1200 Children's Ave., Oklahoma City. For appointments, call 405-271-2662.
     
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty.
     
More than 175 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts.
     
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1218Wed, 31 Jul 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Cardiologist Joins OU Physicians Cardiologist Beau Hawkins, M.D., has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. 
     
Hawkins, a native of Midwest City, is board certified in internal medicine, cardiovascular disease and interventional cardiology. He has specific training in vascular medicine and peripheral vascular intervention – removing blockages in the arteries of the legs or arms through non-surgical techniques. His clinical interests include transradial coronary intervention (performing angioplasty/stenting through the wrist artery), critical limb ischemia (advanced, limb-threatening form of peripheral artery disease) and endovascular venous interventions (angioplasty and thrombolytic procedures for blockages in veins).
     
Hawkins completed clinical and research fellowships in vascular medicine and intervention and interventional cardiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. He completed a fellowship in cardiovascular diseases at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where he also completed his residency and earned his medical degree.
     
Hawkins is a member of the American Heart Association and Fellow in Training of the American College of Cardiology. 
 
Hawkins sees patients on the OU Health Sciences Center campus at 825 N.E. 10th Street, suite 2500. For appointments, call (405) 271-7001.
     
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts.
     
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1219Wed, 31 Jul 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Internist Joins Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer CenterSteven Orwig, M.D., an internal medicine provider, has established his medical practice with the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center. He will be seeing patients in the Survivorship and Supportive Care Clinic.
     
Orwig is board certified in internal medicine. He comes to the Stephenson Cancer Center from the VA Medical Center in Oklahoma City. He completed his internal medicine residency at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. He earned his medical degree from the University of Texas Medical School at San Antonio.
     
Orwig sees patients at the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center, 800 N.E. 10th Street. For an appointment, call (405) 271-8001.
     
The Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center building represents the largest public-private biomedical initiative in Oklahoma history. The 210,000 square-foot facility provides patient-center care, offering the most advanced cancer detection and treatment technology, the largest and most experienced group of cancer specialists, a wide array of supportive services and an environment that provides a warm and comforting experience for patients and caregivers. The center is staffed by doctors from OU Physicians, the state's largest physician group working in multidisciplinary teams to provide cancer patients with the highest standard of care while advancing the latest research into the newest treatment options.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1217Wed, 31 Jul 2013 00:00:00 GMT
OU Pharmacy Team Named Finalist in National CompetitionA student team representing the University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy has been named a finalist in a national student business plan competition, the National Community Pharmacists Association announced this week.
 
The OU team next will square off against two other finalists in the 2013 Good Neighbor Pharmacy NCPA Pruitt-Schutte Student Business Plan Competition. They will present their business plan, "Wellness Integrative Pharmacy," in a live competition at the NCPA's annual convention this fall.
 
OU College of Pharmacy team members include John Lugafet (Nobel), Naomi Kozlowski (Tulsa), Renee Andersen (Tulsa) and Tobi Olusola (Tulsa) with college advisers Eric J. Johnson, M.B.A., C.P.A., associate dean for administration and finance, and Justin Wilson, Pharm.D., adjunct professor.
 
The competition, the first national competition of its kind in the pharmacy profession, drew submissions from 39 schools and colleges of pharmacy across the nation.
 
As finalists, members of the team will receive complimentary registration, travel and lodging to NCPA's 115th Annual Convention and Trade Exposition in Orlando, Fla.
 
A second student team from the OU College of Pharmacy placed in the top ten of the competition with their Tulsa-centered business plan, "Empire Health Pharmacy & Wellness."  That team included students Lance Lugafet (Norman), Philip Looper (Owasso), Kevin Emesiani (Edmond) and Allison Osborne (Tahlequah) with college advisers Katherine O'Neal, Pharm.D., M.B.A., and Robin Milton, D.Ph.
 
The Business Plan Competition honors two champions of independent community pharmacy – the late Neil Pruitt, Sr. and the late H. Joseph Schutte. It is supported by Good Neighbor Pharmacy, Pharmacists Mutual Companies and the NCPA Foundation.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1216Thu, 25 Jul 2013 00:00:00 GMT
CDC Director Shares Insights on Improved Public HealthThe factors impacting public health the most in this country are often hiding in plain sight.
 
That was a key message shared by the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as he addressed a packed auditorium at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City.
 
Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H., shared his insights as he delivered the Edward N. Brandt Memorial Lecture. The lecture is part of Public Health Grand Rounds sponsored by the OU College of Public Health and OU Medicine.
 
"There are so many things that are hiding in plain sight and it is the job of those of us who work in health and public health to bring those things to the fore in ways that will promote health," Frieden said. "Promoting health is not particularly complicated. It is about maximizing health, reducing preventable suffering - reducing preventable illness, injury, disability and death."
 
He pointed out that many answers to the health problems facing Americans are literally staring us in the face if we will just examine the data. 
 
"Often, we don't see what is most apparent or most striking in front of us because we almost take it for granted, but we are living in the midst of a huge increase in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality," he said. "If you look over the scope of time, even if you correct for age, there's been a big increase in heart disease and stroke. It is by far the leading cause of death in this country. It is by far the leading cause of preventable death in this country; and it is by far the leading cause of health disparities in this country."
 
Frieden said that is why the CDC, with a range of public and private partners, launched The Million Hearts campaign 18 months ago.  It is a campaign aimed at preventing a million heart attacks and strokes over the next five years through community prevention in the form of better tobacco control, sodium reduction and trans fat elimination, as well as through clinical prevention measures including a focus by clinicians on what he termed the ‘ABCS' – aspirin, blood pressure, cholesterol and smoking cessation.
 
"Those four areas can save more lives than any other areas in health care," Frieden said. "That doesn't mean we don't improve all over; but in those four areas, we can make a huge difference."
 
The problems are clearly evident when one examines the various facts and figures related to preventable illness, injury, disability and death; but Frieden said so too are the solutions. For example, when evaluating health systems that show the greatest improvements, one often finds similarities.
 
Frieden offered blood pressure as an example.  While it is estimated that some 67 million people in this country have high blood pressure, it is controlled in fewer than half (47%) of those. Yet, some systems have been able to achieve much higher levels of control. In examining health systems with blood pressure control in 80 to 90 percent of patients, Frieden said some common denominators emerge. First, they had focused quality measures.
 
"Providing quality feedback monthly improves outcomes in a year," he said.
 
Next, they had solid health information systems.  Frieden noted that electronic medical records may not be a solution alone but they are definitely an important component. 
 
Finally, team-based care was another common factor in successful blood pressure control among patients.
 
"We know it is not only important to have information, it is important to have people who can act on it," Frieden said.
 
Smoking cessation is one area where the data shows intervention is making a difference. With a new tobacco tax, expanded smoke-free laws, hard-hitting anti-smoking ad campaigns, Frieden said the numbers on smoking are beginning to move. He pointed to preliminary national data just out that shows a rapid decrease in smoking over the past four years with about 4.5 million fewer smokers today than in 2009.
 
To view Frieden's presentation in its entirety, visit:
http://www.uhatok.com/news/media-briefings/447-cdc-director-visits
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1215Thu, 18 Jul 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Geriatrician Joins OU PhysiciansGeriatrician Eugene Steinberg, M.D., has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. Geriatricians provide health care services specific to seniors just as pediatricians specialize in health needs specific to children.
     
Steinberg is board certified in family medicine, geriatric medicine, hospice and palliative medicine. He completed a fellowship in geriatric medicine at the VA Medical Center in Buffalo, N.Y., and completed a family medicine residency at State University of New York (SUNY), Buffalo. He earned his medical degree at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.
     
Steinberg is a member of the American Academy of Home Care Physicians, American Academy of Family Medicine and the American Geriatrics Society.
     
In addition to seeing patients, OU Physicians geriatricians at The Donald W. Reynolds Department of Geriatric Medicine at the OU College of Medicine also teach other physicians about specialized care for seniors at the OU College of Medicine.
     
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts.
     
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region’s future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1214Thu, 18 Jul 2013 00:00:00 GMT
CDC Director in Oklahoma City Today What will it take to turn around the health care crisis in this country? And most importantly, what will it take in Oklahoma where we rank among the worst in the nation with regard to several important health measures?

CDC director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H., will share his insights during a visit to Oklahoma City TODAY – Thursday, July 11, 2013.  Frieden will be the featured speaker for the Edward N. Brant, Jr. Memorial Lecture, part of the Public Health Grand Rounds sponsored by the University of Oklahoma College of Public Health and OU Medicine.  Following his lecture – "Hiding in Plain Sight:  What the data tell us about improving public health and health care in the U.S.," Frieden will address questions from the media and the public.
 
Who: Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H., director, CDC
 
When: 11:45 a.m. *Formal presentation begins at noon sharp*
TODAY - Thursday, July 11, 2013
(A light lunch will be provided starting at 11:30 a.m., quantities limited so arrive early)

Where:  Rainbolt Auditorium
              Samis Education Center (Level 2 – this is the entrance off the Children’s Atrium)

Media parking is available in the lot on the south side of the Atrium.  Event will be streamed at: http://bit.ly/frieden-at-ou

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1213Thu, 11 Jul 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Champion Child Spencer Flies High with Delta SkyEach year Children's Miracle Network Hospitals selects a child who has been treated by a Children's Miracle Network Hospital to be featured in the Delta Sky Magazine. Spencer, 2012 Oklahoma Champion Child, has been selected by CMN Hospitals to appear in July's issue of Delta Sky Magazine due to his captivating smile and amazing life story.

"We thought that Spencer was a great representative of all the kids that were helped with the Champions program and great to represent all the kids who are helped by Children's Miracle Network Hospitals," said Miranda Barnard, Vice President of Communications for Children's Miracle Network Hospitals.

As the 2012 Oklahoma Champion Child of Oklahoma, Spencer took to the skies and joined other Champions from around the country to spread the word that children's hospitals need your support. Spencer's journey took him to Washington, D.C., where he visited the White House and even shook President Barack Obama's hand.  He then flew to Orlando, Fla., for the CMN Hospitals Celebration event at Walt Disney World Resort where he got to interact with Disney characters. The program brings attention to the important work being done at children's hospitals by honoring remarkable children like Spencer.

Spencer was diagnosed with Achondroplasia, a type of dwarfism. Doctors discovered he was deaf when he was only six months old. At eleven months old, he went into a coma after extensive surgery. Physicians soon discovered Spencer's blood sugar was extremely low and they didn't expect him to make it through the night.

"Spencer is a completely unique child. He's so energetic and so positive," said Dr. Terrence Stull, CMRI Patricia Price Browne Distinguished Chair and Chairman for the Department of Pediatrics. "Because of his uniqueness, he requires a host of specialists. We're very blessed to have the whole variety of pediatric specialists in Oklahoma City to care for Spencer."

Spencer has undergone several genetic testing attempts and biopsies, yet answers to these problems are still unknown. Spencer sees Children's Hospital Foundation supported physician-scientists at the Children's Hospital who are working to come up with answers.

For more information on how to support Children's Hospital Foundation, visit www.okchf.org.

Children's Miracle Network Hospitals is an international non-profit organization dedicated to helping children by raising funds and awareness while keeping 100 percent of donations in the community where they are raised.  Children's Hospital Foundation is a proud affiliate of CMN Hospitals and is dedicated to providing funding for pediatric programs in research, education and clinical care for Oklahoma's children. 

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ABOUT US:             
Since its inception in 1983, Children's Hospital Foundation, through its volunteer board and vast community support, has funded pediatric research, education and clinical programs including collaborative projects with the OU Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center, OU Children's Physicians and the University Hospitals Authority and Trust.  For more information, contact Executive Director, Kathy McCracken at 405.650.1718 or visit our website: www.okchf.org.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1210Tue, 09 Jul 2013 00:00:00 GMT
OU Medicine Live Chat: Women's Health Screenings

Most women know about the Pap test, which has helped dramatically reduced cervical cancer rates in the last fifty years.  Still, cervical cancer remains the second most common type of cancer and the third leading cause of cancer deaths among women, with many cases linked to genital infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

New screening guidelines from the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecologists recommend that cervical screenings begin at age 21 and can be done every other year for women until the age of 30. After 30, the test can be done every three years if a woman has had three consecutive Pap tests with normal results. Of course, women at high risk will need for frequent screenings. Women older than 65 years of age should discuss with their doctor whether they continue to need to be screened.

Further reducing both incidence and mortality from cervical cancer has led to technologies that offer new screening techniques for cervical cancer, including high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing and liquid-based cytology (LBC).  The HPV test is done on a sample of cells collected from the cervix, just like a Pap test, but checks for genetic material (DNA) of the human papillomavirus. Liquid-based cytology is a technique for preserving and preparing cells collected from the cervix for laboratory evaluation. Instead of being spread on a slide, the cells are suspended in a vial of liquid preservative. In the laboratory, processing removes debris and place a thin layer of cells onto slides that are stained and read similar to conventional cytology.

Because many young women have HPV and some forms can lead to cervical cancer, the American Cancer Society and other groups recommend HPV testing along with the Pap test as important screening tools for cervical cancer in women over 30. The U.S. Preventive Task Force (USPSTF), on the other hand, recommends the Pap test as the best screening tool for cervical cancer and against the routine use of HPV testing. And the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists supports the use of all three techniques to increase early detection of cervical cancer. 

Experts with OU Medicine say each woman should arm herself with information and then discuss this important issue with her doctor to determine the best screening for her.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1211Tue, 09 Jul 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Pediatric Anesthesiologist Joins OU Children's PhysiciansPediatric anesthesiologist Sri Smitha Kanaparthy, M.D., has established her medical practice with OU Children's Physicians. Anesthesiologists specialize in maintaining airway, managing physiology and the use of drugs and other techniques avert or reduce pain in patients during surgery.           
 
Kanaparthy is board certified in anesthesiology. She completed a pediatric anesthesiology fellowship at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. She completed her anesthesiology residency at Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia. She also completed an anesthesiology residency, as well as earning her medical degree at Jawaharlal Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research in Pondicherry, India .     
     
She is a member of the American Society of Anesthesiologists and the Society of Pediatric Anesthesia.
       
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty.
     
More than 175 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts.
     
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1209Tue, 09 Jul 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Pediatrician Joins OU Children's PhysiciansPediatrician Julia Reza, M.D., has established her medical practice with OU Children's Physicians.
     
Reza is board certified in pediatrics. She was previously in practice in Yukon.  She completed a pediatric residency at Children's Medical Center, Dallas, and earned her medical degree from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas.
     
Reza is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics and a member of the Oklahoma Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics.
     
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty.
     
More than 175 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts.
     
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1208Tue, 09 Jul 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Financial Gift Advances Collaborative Ovarian Cancer Research A $500,000 gift from the Mary K. Chapman Foundation of Tulsa will advance research at the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center with the goal of finding new ways to diagnose and treat ovarian cancer, one of the deadliest cancers for women.

The gift supports collaborative research between the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma and MD Anderson Cancer Center, bringing together expertise in gynecologic cancers at both institutions.

"The University is deeply grateful for this gift which makes a great contribution to the health and well being of women in our state," said OU President David L. Boren.

According to the American Cancer Society, ovarian cancer claims the lives of more than 15,000 women annually in the United States. Its overall five year survival rate is just 43 percent.

"Ovarian cancer often is not diagnosed until it is in an advanced stage. That's because the early warning signs are often subtle and can be missed. That's why this gift is so important. It helps further research at two top cancer centers, where we hope to find new ways to treat this deadly cancer and to identify ovarian cancer early when it is most treatable," said Robert Mannel, M.D., director of the Stephenson Cancer Center.

The gift funds two collaborative research projects. The first targets the tumor microenvironment, the process in which tumor cells interact with surrounding cells. The tumor microenvironment plays an important role in the progression of ovarian cancer. By better defining this process, researchers hope to identify novel therapeutic targets.

Participating Stephenson Cancer Center researchers include Xin Zhang, MD, PhD, Danny Dhanasekaran, PhD, and Doris Benbrook, PhD.

Participating MD Anderson researchers include Sam Mok, PhD, Kwong Wok, PhD, Bulent Ozpolat, MD, PhD and Liu Jinsong, MD, PhD.

The second project funded by the gift focuses on innovative detection methods and molecular profiling of ovarian cancer. It aims to improve ovarian cancer detection through a unique diagnostic test that detects circulating tumor cells. In addition, the project profiles ovarian cancer at the micro-RNA level in an effort to better predict which patients will respond to treatment.

Participating Stephenson Cancer Center researchers include Rajagopal Ramesh, PhD, Scott McMeekin, MD, Katherine Moxley, MD and Kathleen Moore, MD.

Participating MD Anderson researchers include Anil Sood, MD, Alpa Nick, MD and Robert Coleman, MD.  

The Stephenson Cancer Center leads the nation in advancing the treatment of women with ovarian cancer through clinical trials research. Its investigators have been instrumental in evaluating new therapies and raising the standard of care for women with this deadly disease.

Ovarian cancer also is one of MD Anderson's six "Moon Shot" programs – programs focused on fighting specific cancers by combining the latest treatment technology and genetic knowledge.

"We are very grateful to the trustees of the Chapman Foundation for this significant gift. It will help accelerate multidisciplinary, team-oriented cancer research at both institutions," Mannel said.


Leadership of the Stephenson Cancer Center and MD Anderson Cancer Center began discussions in 2009 about how to promote research collaborations between the two institutions. A Memorandum defining a joint Steering Committee to oversee collaborative research was signed in 2009 and renewed in 2012. The Chapman Foundation gift is the first of an anticipated $2 million to be raised from private donors in support of collaborative projects with MD Anderson Cancer Center focused on a number of different types of cancer.      

For more information about the Stephenson Cancer Center, visit www.StephensonCancerCenter.org.  Additional information about the MD Anderson Cancer Center can be found at www.mdanderson.org.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1203Thu, 27 Jun 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Anesthesiologists Join OU Physicians Anesthesiologists Daniel Skelly, M.D., and Casey Windrix, M.D., have established their medical practices with OU Physicians. Anesthesiologists specialize in the use of drugs and other means to avert or reduce pain in patients, especially during surgery.
     
Both doctors completed their anesthesiology residencies at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine where they also earned their medical degrees.
     
They are members of the American Society of Anesthesiologists.
     
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts.
     
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1202Wed, 26 Jun 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Neonatal-perinatal Specialist Joins OU Children's PhysiciansCourtney Atchley, D.O., has established her practice with OU Children's Physicians.
     
Atchley is board certified in pediatrics and board eligible in neonatology. She completed a fellowship in neonatal-perinatal medicine at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and completed a pediatric residency at the University of Missouri-Child Health, Columbia, Mo. She earned her doctor of osteopathic medicine degree at Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Tulsa, and an undergraduate degree at the University of Oklahoma.
     
Atchley is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Southern Society for Pediatric Research.
     
OU Children's Physicians practice as part of OU Physicians, Oklahoma's largest physician group. The group encompasses nearly every child and adult medical specialty.
     
More than 175 of these specialists committed their practices to the care of children. The majority of OU Children's Physicians are board certified in children's specialties. Many provide pediatric-specific services unavailable elsewhere in the state. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts.
     
OU Children's Physicians see patients in their offices at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center. Many children with birth defects, critical injuries or serious diseases who can't be helped elsewhere come to OU Children's Physicians. Oklahoma doctors and parents rely on OU Children's Physicians depth of experience, nationally renowned expertise and sensitivity to children's emotional needs.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1201Wed, 26 Jun 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Crest Fresh Market Campaign a Success for Oklahoma's Kids 

Through the efforts of energized and driven employees and customers, Crest Fresh Market's inaugural three-week fundraising campaign raised more than $41,000 for Children's Miracle Network Hospitals benefiting Children's Hospital Foundation.

Crest Fresh Market's management led the way by encouraging customers and associates to join together in raising funds for pediatric research, education and clinical care to ensure Oklahoma's children have a chance to live happy, healthy lives.

This family-owned grocery chain was founded by Nick Harroz in 1946. Today, Nick's son, Bruce Harroz, is the new generation of leadership and is continuing to follow his father's teachings with more stores and larger variety. Bruce and his wife, Tina, have brought growth and development to the company expanding to seven different store locations in the OKC metro area with store number eight under construction in Norman.

"With one visit to Children's Hospital, we instantly knew we needed to do our part for the Children's Hospital Foundation," said Tina Harroz. "What the Foundation is doing is vital for the children of Oklahoma."

The funds raised through the campaign will go to help miracle children like, Maddison. Maddison was born with four major heart defects and severe lung defects, causing pulmonary hypertension. She has undergone multiple procedures to repair her heart and provide blood to her lungs. Several more procedures will be necessary to increase the size of her lung arteries and lower the pressure in her lungs. Because of fundraising efforts like Crest Fresh Markets campaign, Maddison is able to receive top-notch care from world renowned physician-scientists right here in Oklahoma at the Children's Hospital.

For more information on how to support Children's Hospital Foundation, visit www.okchf.org.

Children's Miracle Network Hospitals is an international non-profit organization dedicated to helping children by raising funds and awareness while keeping 100 percent of donations in the community where they are raised.  Children's Hospital Foundation is a proud affiliate of CMN Hospitals and is dedicated to providing funding for pediatric programs in research, education and clinical care for Oklahoma's children. 

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ABOUT US: 
Children's Hospital Foundation, proud affiliate of Children's Miracle Network Hospitals, is a nonprofit 501c (3) organization in Oklahoma improving the health of children. Since its inception in 1983, Children's Hospital Foundation, through its volunteer board and vast community support, has funded pediatric research, education and clinical programs including collaborative projects with the OU Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center, OU Children's Physicians and the University Hospitals Authority and Trust.  For more information, contact Executive Director, Kathy McCracken at 405.650.1718 or visit our website: www.okchf.org.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1197Tue, 18 Jun 2013 00:00:00 GMT
OU College of Pharmacy Immunization Efforts Receive National AwardThe National Adult and Influenza Immunization Summit has honored immunization efforts by the University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy as part of its 2013 Immunization Excellence Awards.

The college's immunization initiative began three years ago, led by Tracy Hagemann, Pharm.D., F.C.C.P., and Susan Conway, Pharm.D., B.C.P.S., C.A.C.P. It focused on the development and implementation of free influenza vaccination clinics at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. The program also provided a setting for the education of pharmacy students in an effort to improve their skills and knowledge of vaccinations.  

Last year, the program provided 12 immunization clinics and eight traveling immunization pods, vaccinating 3292 people and resulting in a 42 percent increase in influenza vaccination rates among OUHSC employees since 2010.

It's planning and success earned it a Summit Honorable Mention Award in the Healthcare Personnel Campaign category at the National Adult and Influenza Immunization Summit held in Atlanta, Ga.

The awards recognize the value and extraordinary contributions of individuals and organizations towards improved adult, adolescent and childhood vaccination rates within their communities.

The National Adult and Influenza Immunization Summit was started in 2000 and has more than 400 members representing more than 100 public and private organizations with an interest in addressing and resolving  influenza and adult vaccine issues.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1196Mon, 17 Jun 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Don't Get Burned This SummerSummer is full of outdoor activities, but dermatologists with OU Medicine warn there's nothing worse than the sting of serious sunburn to ruin what should be a day of fun in the sun. 

Dr. Pamela Allen of OU Physicians Dermatology said proper protection from the sun is your family's best defense. Sunscreen should be applied every time a child older than six-months goes outside, and should be reapplied frequently.

Here are  a few  quick sun safety tips from OU Physicians Dermatology:
Strength (SPF) matters – Choose products with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 or higher.  The American Academy of Dermatology recommends at least a 30 SPF.

Broad Spectrum Protection is best - Use broad spectrum sunscreens that protect against both the sun' s UVA and UVB rays.  Under the new rules, products labeled as “broad spectrum” will have to pass a test to prove they offer enough protection from both types of rays.  However, most products now claiming both UVA and UVB protection already pass the test.

Reapply - Sunscreen should be reapplied at least every two hours, and more often if you're sweating or jumping in and out of the water.

Sunscreen Alone Is Not Enough -  Sunscreen is not a license to spend more time in the sun. Allen and fellow dermatologists recommend limiting your time in the sun, especially between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., when the sun's rays are most intense. Cover up with broad-brimmed hats, sunglasses and clothing.

Have questions about sun safety? Wonder how to catch the early warning signs of skin cancer? Dr. Allen will field questions from the public in a live chat Friday, June 7th at 10 a.m. at www.oumedicine.com/chat. The chat is offered as a free public service by OU Medicine. 

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1195Fri, 14 Jun 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Tornado Victims Receive Top Care Thanks to DonorsFollowing the devastating tornadoes in the month of May, 65 children were transported to The Children's Hospital to receive quality care just a few miles away from home. 
 
The donations made to Children's Hospital Foundation help fund the nation's best physician-scientists to practice at The Children's Hospital, like David Tuggle, M.D., CMRI Paula Milburn Miller Chair for Pediatric Surgery. After seeing the aftermath of May 3rd, 1999, Dr. Tuggle aided in the efforts of establishing OU Medical Center's Level One Trauma Center.
 
"OU Medical Center is the only hospital in Oklahoma that is an American College of Surgeons Verified Level One Trauma Center for both adults and children," said Dr. Robert Letton, M.D., Pediatric Trauma Medical Director and a Children's Hospital Foundation supported physician. "Verified trauma centers must meet essential criteria to ensure trauma care capability and institutional performance, and provides confirmation that OU Medical Center has demonstrated its commitment to providing the highest quality trauma care for all injured patients regardless of age."
 
The Children's Hospital has grown tremendously in staff and resources, therefore allowing outstanding treatment for children in our state. Donations made to the foundation directly impact Oklahoma's children by funding programs including emergency medicine and a host of research programs in the quest to combat pediatric illnesses and injury. To further prepare our state to accept tomorrow's challenges for sick and injured children, the Foundation continues to raise funds to enhance critical care for Oklahoma's children.
 
To support Children's Hospital Foundation, visit www.okchf.org. Text CMN4Kids to 50555 to donate $5 to Children's Hospital Foundation.

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ABOUT US:             
Children's Hospital Foundation, proud affiliate of Children's Miracle Network Hospitals, is a nonprofit 501c (3) organization in Oklahoma striving to improve the health of children. Since its inception in 1983, Children's Hospital Foundation, through its volunteer board and vast community support, has funded pediatric research and education programs including collaborative projects with the OU Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center, OU Children's Physicians and the University Hospitals Authority and Trust.  For more information, contact Executive Director, Kathy McCracken at 405.650.1718 or visit our website: www.okchf.org.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1194Wed, 12 Jun 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Cancer Center Receives Big DeliveryWith the delivery of a 40-ton piece of high-tech equipment today, the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center welcomed the newest FDA-approved proton therapy system to Oklahoma.

Mevion Medical Systems delivered the Proton Therapy System as part of the final phase of installation at the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.

"We are pleased to receive this revolutionary technology and to add this innovative proton therapy system to the expansive list of cancer services available at the Stephenson Cancer Center," said OU President David L. Boren.

Proton therapy is a form of targeted radiation therapy. It uses beams of extremely fast-moving protons to treat cancer.

"Typical radiation uses X-ray beams which go through the tumor but can impact healthy tissue along the path of the beam to the tumor and beyond it, too," said Terence Herman, M.D., chair of the Radiation Oncology Department at the OU College of Medicine. "With proton therapy, we are able to focus the proton beam within the tumor, resulting in less damage to normal tissue."

The MEVION S250 Proton Therapy System is unique in that it was developed to provide the same precise, non-invasive treatment advantages and capabilities of complex, large and costly proton therapy systems but with improved reliability, and lower implementation and operational costs.

"The arrival of this superconducting synchrocyclotron signals an important milestone for the Stephenson Cancer Center and for our patients," said Robert Mannel, M.D., director of the Cancer Center. "This system adds yet another tool to the many available at a comprehensive cancer center like ours as we work to provide the highest quality of care to our patients and toward continued excellence in cancer research."

Until the recent FDA approval of the MEVION S250 proton therapy system, the broad adoption of proton therapy has been greatly limited by the enormous cost, large footprint, and technical complexity of traditional proton therapy systems.  The new system brings the management and operation of proton therapy to levels similar to modern X-ray radiation therapy devices.

"Mevion is proud to bring the most advanced form of radiation treatment to Oklahoma," said Mevion Medical Systems Chief Executive Officer Joseph Jachinowski.  "The installation of this groundbreaking technology at the Stephenson Cancer Center is a prime example of practical proton therapy deployment; delivering modern and advanced radiation therapy treatments in a fiscally responsible way, all within a fully integrated cancer center and with the ability to grow when patient demand requires it."

At six feet in diameter, the accelerator is large, but still it is a fraction of the size of previous proton systems in use around the country.

"An academic-based, comprehensive cancer center, like ours, is the perfect venue for this new technology," said M. Dewayne Andrews, M.D., MACP, senior vice president and provost of the OU Health Sciences Center and executive dean of the OU College of Medicine. "Through our treatment protocols and our clinical trials, it will allow us to help evaluate the best use of proton therapy in the treatment of cancer in adults and in children."

The Stephenson Cancer Center is one of only three sites nationwide to acquire the new proton therapy system.

"Clinical innovation is an integral part of the commitment to excellence in medical care, education and research at OU Medicine and the OU Health Sciences Center," said Mike Samis, chairman of the University Hospitals Authority and Trust. "The addition of this first-of-its-kind proton therapy system will enhance and expand the comprehensive list of services available to Oklahoma cancer patients of all ages."

The third and final phase of installation, setup and then testing of the MEVION S250 proton therapy system at the Stephenson Cancer Center is expected to take several months.

As one of only 35 primary sites nationally in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, the Stephenson Cancer Center already conducts many trials with traditional radiation therapy.  The addition of the MEVION S250 Proton Therapy System will provide new opportunities to conduct research aimed at determining how and in what cancers proton therapy can be most effective.

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As Oklahoma's only comprehensive academic cancer center, the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma is raising the standard of cancer treatment in the state and region through patient-centered care, research and education. In association with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is decreasing the burden of cancer in Oklahoma through innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research. Cancer Center scientists are conducting more than 100 cancer research projects supported by more than $20 million in peer-reviewed annual funding from sponsors, including the National Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society. The Stephenson Cancer Center is located in a state-of-the-art, 210,000-square-foot facility on the campus of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City. For additional information, visit www.StephensonCancerCenter.org.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1189Mon, 03 Jun 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Post-Tornado Infectious Disease Prevention Proper Health Precautions are an Important Part of RecoveryAs families, friends and volunteers begin to return to pick up the pieces following this week's deadly tornadoes, it is important to take certain precautions to prevent infections.

Dr. Robert Welliver, an infectious disease specialist with OU Medicine, said that infections following natural disasters may stem from the disaster itself, from temporary living conditions for those displaced by it or from exposure to insects and animals that can transmit unique infectious agents.

After disasters like this week's tornadoes, the environment itself can sometimes pose a risk.

"A surprising result of the horrific Joplin, Missouri tornado was the appearance of the fungus Apophysomyces trapeziformis in wounds of victims, particularly penetrating wounds in which wood or decaying vegetative matter was present," Welliver said.

He added it is not clear, however, if the fungus will be recovered from wounds of victims of disasters in other geographic regions, like those here in Oklahoma.

Organisms that can be present in dirt and debris include bacteria like streptococci, staphylococci, pseudomonas, tetanus and nontuberculous mycobacteria. Appropriate protective clothing can help reduce exposure in the aftermath of a disaster. Proper decontamination of hands before eating is vital. It is also critical to properly clean and care for all wounds.  Even a minor cut or scrape can be an entry point for infection.

"Wounds occurring in survivors of natural disasters should be cultured for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, fungi and mycobacteria if signs of infection are present," Welliver said.

He added anyone working amidst the debris should ensure that they are current on their tetanus and other vaccinations.

With damp conditions and warmer temperatures, any pools of standing water amidst the debris can be a breeding ground for mosquitoes, which can be carriers of West Nile virus and other illnesses.

"There is currently no vaccine for West Nile virus so the best protection is to avoid mosquito bites," Welliver said. "That means avoid being outdoors at dawn or dusk when the mosquitoes are most active. Wear socks and shoes, long-sleeved shirts and long pant; and apply mosquito repellant to exposed skin."

Illness prevention is also important when large numbers of individuals are temporarily housed together following a natural disaster.

"It is important to avoid crowded conditions as much as possible, to ensure access to clean water and adequate sanitation and to maintain proper nutrition and personal cleanliness to avoid both viral and bacterial infections," Welliver said.

Individuals crowded together for prolonged periods are more likely to contract tuberculosis, influenza and upper respiratory infections from members of the group who previously had these infections before the disaster occurred.

Welliver added that while many believe victims of natural disasters become unusually susceptible to infectious disease. In most instances, the disaster itself does not lead to infection.

"In other words, victims removed from the rubble will probably not develop infections unless other circumstances prevail. That's why prevention is so important," he said.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1183Thu, 23 May 2013 00:00:00 GMT
New Tinnitus Clinic at OU College of Allied HealthRing… Ring…

No, it's not the phone. It's your ears.

One in 10 adults in Oklahoma and across the nation experiences tinnitus, often referred to as "ringing in the ears," but a new clinic at the University of Oklahoma College of Allied Health now offers a treatment to help silence it.

"Tinnitus is a condition in which a person perceives sound that is not actually present in the environment. It can be a ringing sound in the ears, but also can be a whooshing, chirping, a cricket-like sound, hissing or whistling," said Suzanne Kimball, AuD, assistant professor, Communication Sciences and Disorders, OU College of Allied Health.

She said it can be particularly bothersome at night when trying to fall asleep and can worsen during times of stress.

While there are many possible reasons for tinnitus, it most often is associated with damage to the auditory system. Interestingly, someone can have damage in the ear without realizing it because it may be in an area of hearing that is not important for understanding speech. That's where the new Tinnitus and Hypercusis Clinic at the college's John W. Keys Speech and Hearing Center comes in.

"With the tinnitus evaluation, we have the capability of testing these extremely high pitches to see if there is any damage in the auditory system," Kimball said.

Tinnitus can also be brought on by noise exposure, medications and medical conditions.  It can't be cured; and for many years, patients were told there was nothing that could be done.  However, thanks to years of research, there now is help. Kimball said many evidence-based studies show treatment can help patients effectively manage their tinnitus.

"If a patient has hearing loss, he or she may be a good candidate for hearing aids which not only aids with communication abilities, but can also help relieve their tinnitus symptoms," Kimball said. "Several hearing aids have special tinnitus programs that use sound generators to provide relief."

Kimball said more than 70 percent of the tinnitus patients fitted with hearing aids report at least some degree of relief. 

For those who have tinnitus without hearing loss, there also are ways to help quiet the ringing in the ears.  Often these individuals are good candidates for something known as sound therapy devices.

"We fit them with a sound therapy device. That's a device that uses a variety of different methods, including filtered music, rain shower sounds or modulated tones, to provide relief," Kimball said.

The devices are similar to an iPod in size and use high-fidelity earphones. They are custom fit for each individual based on the tinnitus evaluation results.  Then utilizing a set protocol for usage, the individual listens to the stimulus at times of the day when the tinnitus is most bothersome.  This helps mask the annoying sounds and help the brain learn to ignore the "ringing" which helps eliminate the aggravation tinnitus causes for those who suffer from it.

"Research shows that tinnitus treatments can be very effective. At our new clinic, we look forward to helping those who have this condition find relief," Kimball said.

The clinic, which just opened this month, will host two educational sessions for those interested in learning more about tinnitus or hearing loss.  Those seminars are scheduled for noon or 6 p.m. on Tuesday, May 21st at the OU College of Allied Health, 1200 N. Stonewall in Oklahoma City.  The sessions are geared toward health care providers and the public and are offered at no cost to participants.  To reserve a spot, call (405) 212-4169, ext. 46086. 

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1182Thu, 23 May 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Sammy Mayfield Receives Regents' Award for Superior Staff at OUHSCOKLAHOMA CITY – Sammy Mayfield, assistant controller in the Office of Financial Services, is the 2013 recipient of the Regents’ Award for Superior Staff at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.

The OU Board of Regents established the award in 1988 to recognize outstanding contributions made by OU staff members whose job performance, service activities and dedication have enhanced the mission of the university. The award was presented at the OU Health Sciences Center Employee Recognition Luncheon April 24.

In his nomination letter, Mayfield’s supervisor, Brad Avery, assistant vice president for administration and finance and controller, noted that Mayfield has worked in "most every aspect of Financial Services, from general accounting to grants and contracts," as well as serving as a "’team lead’ in every campus IT system implementation over the past 20 years. "When the campus implemented PeopleSoft Financials a number of years ago," he added, "Sammy was the glue that kept the project together."

Avery, who also worked with Mayfield prior to his time in Financial Services, additionally praised Mayfield for his numerous contributions to the Health Sciences Center during Mayfield’s 38-year tenure at the university and referred to him as "the definition of a model employee and supervisor" who "does not seek out attention or toot his own horn, but is rather the grand man behind the scenes who keeps everything working as it should."

"There are so many superlatives that I could mention to describe Sammy, and while all would be true, the list still might fall short of measuring his contributions over 38 years of dedicated service to the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences," wrote Terry Henson, associate vice president for administration and finance and chief financial officer at the Health Sciences Center, in his letter of support.

"Not only is he competent in the technical sense, Sammy is sought out to assist in crafting solutions when the issues are complex and the answers are not precise," Henson added. "Sammy understands the power of empathy when working with faculty and staff ‘customers’ as they navigate the layers of statutes, regulations, policies and procedures applicable to a particular situation."

Henson also pointed out that Mayfield "is an effective leader who has successfully led a variety of core accounting units through several major system implementations" and that his advice and counsel is valued as a member of campus-wide and institutional task force or policy review initiatives.

"Sammy embodies a unique combination of wisdom and humility," she concluded, adding, "He has never sought the spotlight, yet has applauded others whose accomplishments would not be possible without his contributions. He is truly deserving of this recognition for a body of work that has and continues to contribute to the success of the OU Health Sciences Center."

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1173Tuesday, May 1, 2013
Drug Offers Precious Months to Patients with Advanced Cervical CancerA National Cancer Institute clinical trial conducted at the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center and other sites in the U.S. and Spain brings new hope to patients with advanced cervical cancer in the form of a life-extending treatment option.

The Stephenson Cancer Center was one of the top two enrolling sites for the clinical trial that involved 452 patients.

The study evaluated the drug Avastin (bevacizumab) in women with recurrent, persistent or metastatic cervical cancer that was not curable with standard treatments. The research showed Avastin significantly improved overall survival when added to either of two chemotherapy regimens.

"Cervical cancer patients who got the standard chemotherapy had a median survival of 13.3 months," said Dr. Lisa M. Landrum, a gynecologic oncologist and researchers with the Stephenson Cancer Center. "Those who had standard chemotherapy with the Avastin lived almost four months longer - with a median survival of 17 months."

In fact, the NCI decided to announce interim findings from the study because they were considered so statistically significant.

"Four months, when you are talking about 17 months, is a very big statistical increase. This might be a chance to see a wedding or a graduation - to share one of the pivotal events a person has in their lifetime," Landrum said.

Avastin works by blocking the blood supply that feeds cancer tumors.  Although already FDA approved for use in the treatment of some types of cancer, it is not yet approved for cervical cancer.  Avastin is also expensive and without FDA approval, insurance companies may not cover the cost. So it remains mainly available to cervical cancer patients who are willing to participate in clinical trials.

"Patients who are interested should always ask their doctors for the opportunity to participate in clinical trials in which the drug and related care is typically provided free of charge to participants," Landrum said.

Side effects of Avastin typically relate to impeding the blood supply, said Landrum.  For example, wound healing might be poor or patients might tend to form blood clots.  Some might also be more prone to hypertensive events.

Future research will likely determine if the addition of Avastin to other chemotherapeutic therapies can further lengthen survival.

To learn more about clinical trials at the Stephenson Cancer Center, visit www.oumedicine.com/cancer.

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About the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center:
As Oklahoma's only comprehensive academic cancer center, the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma is raising the standard of cancer treatment in the state and region through patient-centered care, research and education. In association with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is decreasing the burden of cancer in Oklahoma through innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research. Cancer Center scientists are conducting more than 100 cancer research projects supported by more than $20 million in peer-reviewed annual funding from sponsors, including the National Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society. The Stephenson Cancer Center is located in a state-of-the-art, 210,000-square-foot facility on the campus of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City. For additional information, visit www.StephensonCancerCenter.org.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1169Mon, 13 May 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Grant Advances OU Research into a New Bladder Cancer TreatmentA $528,000 grant will help researchers with the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma explore a promising, new treatment for bladder cancer, the fourth most common cancer in men.

The Research Scholar Grant was awarded by the American Cancer Society to Youngjae You, Ph.D., a Cancer Center member and associate professor in the OU College of Pharmacy's Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences.

"Bladder cancer may be the fourth most common cancer in men, but it is the most expensive cancer to treat," You said, adding the reason it is so costly to treat is because current treatment requires frequent, follow-up exams utilizing cystoscopy.

Cystoscopy utilizes a slender, cylindrical instrument equipped with a small camera to examine the interior of the urinary bladder and also to introduce treatments there. However, current cystoscopy has some limitations, including difficulty in detecting small tumors.

You said the best way to reduce bladder cancer recurrence is sensitive detection and complete eradication at an early stage. He believes accomplishing this will require a therapy that combines fluorescence cystoscopic detection with photodynamic therapy.

Fluorescence cystoscopy, unlike conventional cystoscopy, involves injecting dyes into cells, and illuminating them under the appropriate light to make it easier to detect those that are cancerous.
 
Photodynamic therapy uses a combination of special light rays and drugs to destroy cancer cells.
 
You said the goal of combining the two is a more targeted, more effective bladder cancer treatment.
 
"This could reduce the need for cystoscopy, saving the health care system a lot of money while also helping reduce patients' risk of recurrence and progression," You said.

If successful, the research would result in the development of improved options for the diagnosis and treatment of non-muscle, invasive bladder cancers.

You's principal OU Health Sciences Center collaborators in the research project are fellow Cancer Center members Dr. Sukyung Woo, also of the OU College of Pharmacy, and Dr. Robert Hurst, with the OU College of Medicine's Department of Urology.

"I am excited and honored to receive the Research Scholar Grant and grateful to the American Cancer Society for its generous support of our research," You said.

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About the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center:
As Oklahoma's only comprehensive academic cancer center, the Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma is raising the standard of cancer treatment in the state and region through patient-centered care, research and education. In association with the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, the Stephenson Cancer Center is decreasing the burden of cancer in Oklahoma through innovative laboratory, clinical and populations-based research. Cancer Center scientists are conducting more than 100 cancer research projects supported by more than $20 million in peer-reviewed annual funding from sponsors, including the National Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society. The Stephenson Cancer Center is located in a state-of-the-art, 210,000-square-foot facility on the campus of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City. For additional information, visit www.StephensonCancerCenter.org.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1168Mon, 13 May 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Podiatrist Joins OU PhysiciansPodiatrist Kiersten B. Weber, D.P.M., has established her practice with OU Physicians. She will see patients in the Harold Hamm Diabetes Center.
     
Weber has been in private practice as a podiatrist in Edmond since 2000. She earned her doctorate in podiatric medicine at Des Moines University College of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery, Iowa. She completed a podiatric surgical residency at The Cambridge Hospital, Boston.
     
Weber is a member of the Oklahoma Podiatric Medical Association, the American Podiatric Medical Association and the International Aesthetic Foot Society.
     
The Harold Hamm Diabetes Center is located at 1000 N. Lincoln Blvd., Suite 3400. For appointments, call (405) 271-1000.
     
The Harold Hamm Diabetes Center is an OU Medicine Center of Excellence and a world leader in eradicating diabetes through innovative research, dramatically improved patient care, and strategies aimed at the prevention of diabetes. OU Medicine combines the research, education and health care expertise of OU Medical Center, The Children's Hospital, OU Physicians and the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine to establish Oklahoma's largest and most comprehensive health care system. With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group, encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1160Wed, 01 May 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Dr. Steve Blevins honored as Master TeacherThe 2013 winner of the Stanton L. Young Master Teacher Award, Steve Blevins, M.D., is lauded by his peers as a skilled educator, excellent clinician and a major contributor to curriculum development at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.
 
Blevins received the honor during a ceremony Tuesday night, April 16. The Stanton L. Young Master Teacher Award is the OU College of Medicine's most important and prestigious honor in recognition of excellence in teaching. It was begun in 1983 through the generosity and commitment of Stanton L. and Barbara Young. The award honors OU College of Medicine faculty members who go beyond excellence in the classroom or on clinical rounds and touch lives and change attitudes. Blevins joins an exemplary group of Master Teachers who inspire by the example of their commitment as physicians or scientists, often both.
 
"Dr. Blevins is a skilled bedside teacher, always demonstrating compassion and professionalism," M. Dewayne Andrews, M.D., executive dean of the OU College of Medicine, said during his introduction of Dr. Blevins. "He exhibits excellent patient rapport, and his love of medicine is contagious."
 
Blevins joined the faculty of the OU College of Medicine in 1994. He earned his doctor of medicine degree from Baylor College of Medicine, and took his residency training in internal medicine at the OU Health Sciences Center. Upon completion of his residency, he joined the Department of Medicine, where he is now associate professor of medicine and an assistant dean for curriculum development in the OU College of Medicine.
 
Blevins played a key role in the development of a new curriculum structure, launched in 2010, for the first two years of coursework at the OU College of Medicine. He was chosen to develop a "capstone course" that concludes students' second year of medical school. The course requires students to encompass all of the preceding organ-system courses into a final review course to demonstrate their understanding and mastery through their ability to work through clinical cases.
 
"Because of his knowledge of medicine, his collaborative approach with other faculty and his skill in writing, Dr. Blevins was chosen to take on this task," Andrews said. "The results were astounding, and the course was a successful culmination of the new curriculum. During the course reviews, more than 90 percent of students gave Dr. Blevins a perfect evaluation score in his role as course director."
 
Outside of medicine, Blevins enjoys broad interests, including music, literature and creative writing. For many years, he has held leadership positions with the Civic Music Association of Oklahoma City and the Chamber Music Society of Oklahoma City. He also writes a blog that has attracted a national following for his musings that range from humorous parody to poignant personal stories.
 
Blevins also received the Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine award in 2009, and in spring 2012, he was nominated for an Aesculapian Award given by students for excellence in teaching.
 
As recipient of the Master Teacher Award, Blevins receives a $15,000 cash prize, one of the largest awards in the nation for excellence in medical teaching.
 
The guest speaker for the ceremony was Arthur Ross, M.D., professor of surgery and pediatrics, and dean of the School of Medicine at West Virginia University.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1152Wed, 24 Apr 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Teens, Vaccines and Other Adolescent Health MattersA teenagers' world can be fraught with challenges, both physical and emotional; and helping your teen stay healthy starts with knowledge.

"Parents often look to their pediatricians for advice to help keep their children healthy when they are young, but as children become teens, those visits to the doctor's office can become less frequent. Yet, they are still just as important," said Dr. Philip Rettig, an adolescent medicine specialist with OU Children's Physicians.

Annual Health Checks
Rettig pointed out that there are many health issues that can crop up in the teen years, everything from acne to high blood pressure, from concerns about normal puberty to new emotional and behavioral issues, from athletic injuries to menstrual disorders. That's why continued, regular visits to the doctor's office can be so beneficial.

Rettig pointed out that as youth mature and assert more independence, they are sometimes more reluctant to share health concerns with parents. So having a physician in whom they can confide is helpful.

Adolescence also is a good time to help teens begin to take more control of their health. For instance, you can encourage them to start scheduling their own doctors' appointments and to ask their own questions at those visits. It's also important to help them learn to take their medications as directed.

Vaccines
Rettig said that just as in earlier childhood, vaccinations are important in the teen years.  Having all the vaccines required to enter school is no longer equal to being "up to date" for preteens and teens. Several new vaccines which provide safe and effective protection  against infections that are significant threats to teens are now recommended starting at ages 11 to 12 years

However, recent research by Dr. Paul Darden, a colleague at OU Medicine, looked at why many teens are still not getting the recommended vaccinations.

"Since 2005, three new vaccines recommended for adolescents have been licensed and approved for use but we are not achieving our national goals," said study author Dr. Paul Darden of the Department of Pediatrics, OU College of Medicine. 
?The three vaccines are Tdap (tetanus toxoid, diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccine), a vaccine for meningitis - MCV4 (quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine), and the vaccine for HPV (human papilloma virus).

A third or more of teens have not received the Tdap or MCV4 vaccines. About two thirds have not been vaccinated against HPV, which has also been recommended for adolescent boys for the past two years. Researchers found the low rate of HPV immunization particularly concerning.

"HPV is a vaccine that prevents cervical cancer, a serious health condition in women. So it's worrisome that adolescents are not getting the HPV vaccine," Rettig said.

Currently, in Oklahoma, only the Tdap vaccination is required for all seventh and eighth grade students as of the fall of 2012.  The meningitis and HPV vaccines, though recommended, are not mandatory.

Darden and his colleagues believe the study points to the importance of better educating families, teens and health care providers about the safety and effectiveness of vaccines.

Acne
Acne is a frustrating reality in the teen years for most. In fact, eight in every ten teens experiences some degree of acne.

"Acne is not caused by eating chocolate or fried foods," Rettig said. "It's actually caused by increased levels of certain hormones and so is a common occurrence in adolescence."

When those levels increase fat glands in the skin are stimulated and begin producing more sebum, an oily secretion that lubricates and protects the skin. With acne, sebum combines with dead skin cells and other debris, blocking follicles in the skin and causing blackheads and pimples.

The good news is there are a growing number of treatments, both over-the-counter and prescription, available to help teens with acne issues. Your health care provider can help you find the right treatment for you.

Menstrual Disorders
Up to two-thirds of teen-age girls will consult a physician during their teen years with a concern about their periods: not yet having them, having them infrequently, having them excessively, or having severe cramps or other menstrual symptoms.  Consultation with a physician familiar with normal adolescent development and these issues will help the adolescent female and her parent(s) deal with the frequent "normal" variations,  and treat and diagnose the uncommon medical problems that can lead to these symptoms.

Substance Abuse
It is during the teen years when many first experiment with illicit drugs or alcohol. That's why the American Academy of Pediatrics now recommends that pediatricians provide both substance abuse education and screening during routine clinical care.

Sadly one-fourth of those who use illicit drugs between the ages of 12 and 17 will develop dependency. It's still unclear why some teens can flirt with alcohol or drug use and then just stop, while others become addicted.

What is known is that family history increases a child's risk.  Other risk factors include:
- Untreated psychological conditions such as depression or anxiety
- Thrill-seeking behavior
- An eating disorder
- Associating with known drug users
- Lack of parental supervision
- Physical or verbal abuse in the home

The greater the number of risk factors, the greater the risk for alcohol or substance abuse.  If you have concerns, talk to your teen, but come to the conversation well informed.  The U.S. Department of Education recommends that parents know the following facts:
- The different types of drugs and their street names
- What each drug and any associated paraphernalia look like
- The physical and behavioral signs of drug abuse
- How to get your child help if you suspect a substance abuse problem

To have questions about your teen's health answered, Dr. Rettig will be available for a live chat on Friday, April 26th at noon at www.oumedicine.com/chat

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1151Wed, 24 Apr 2013 00:00:00 GMT
OKC Cancer Center to be Site for Landmark Cancer Genome AtlasThe Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center has been selected as a Tissue Source Site for The Cancer Genome Atlas, a landmark research initiative supported by the National Institutes of Health. 

The goal of the Cancer Genome Atlas is to understand why the cells in 20 specific types of cancer grow out of control and lead to tumor formation and metastasis. Begun in 2006 as a pilot project, the Cancer Genome Atlas has grown into an international research initiative involving hundreds of medical centers and laboratories worldwide involved in collecting, sequencing, analyzing and ultimately utilizing the genomic data generated by the project.      

"The Cancer Genome Atlas project will reveal a great deal about why tumors develop, and the Stephenson Cancer Center is proud to be able to contribute to this effort," said Dr. Robert Mannel, director of the Cancer Center. "As a Tissue Source Site in this initiative, Stephenson Cancer Center patients will have the opportunity to participate in a major research project that will hopefully lead to more effective cancer drugs and better strategies to prevent this dreadful disease."

Every cell contains a complete set of instructions encoded in its DNA – collectively known as the genome. Those instructions tell the cell how to develop. When the instructions have mistakes, cells may not function normally. In some instances these mistakes can lead cells to multiply out of control and cause cancer. 

By looking at the genomic information in thousands of samples from many different patients, Cancer Genome Atlas researchers will gain a better understanding of what makes one cancer different from another. Even two patients with the same type of cancer may experience very different outcomes or respond very differently to treatments.  By connecting specific genomic changes with specific outcomes, researchers will be able to develop more effective, individualized ways of helping each cancer patient.

"This is a landmark study in the fight against cancer that includes the leading national and international cancer research institutions. Our patients who donate tumor tissue will be contributing to our understanding of the most basic differences between normal cells and cancer," said Dr. Rosemary Zuna, lead pathologist for the project at the Stephenson Cancer Center. "This project promises to revolutionize our understanding of cancer biology and lead to more effective, less toxic treatments."

As a designated Tissue Source Site for the Cancer Genome Atlas, the Stephenson Cancer Center will be contributing samples of normal and cancer tissue from patients, along with treatment and outcome information. 

Eligible patients at the Stephenson Cancer Center will have the opportunity to participate in the study by donating tissue, typically collected during routine surgical procedures. All patient information is de-identified to maintain confidentiality.    

For more information about research at the Stephenson Cancer Center please visit www.StephensonCancerCenter.org

This project has been funded in whole or in part with federal funds from the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, under Contract No. HHSN261200800001E. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views of policies of the Department of Health and Human Services, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1141Tue, 16 Apr 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Babies: What to Expect When They Are BornDuring the seemingly long pregnancy months, you long to bring your new baby into the world. You plan and prepare, but most new parents still find themselves somewhat overwhelmed when they first arrive home with their newborn baby boy or girl.

Pediatricians with OU Children's Physicians offer some simple tips to help you through those first few months.

"Before you and your baby leave the hospital, doctors will look for some key factors to ensure he or she is healthy and ready for home," said Casey Hester, M.D., a pediatrician with OU Children's Physicians. "We want to know that your baby is breathing well and able to maintain an appropriate body temperature.  We also want to be sure he or she is feeding well."

Hester said it is important not to let your baby get dehydrated. Whether breastfed or bottle-fed, your baby should be eating every two to three hours and should have at least three or four wet diapers every 24 hours. Hester said some new parents find it helpful to keep a journal tracking the baby's feedings and diaper changes in those first few days.

Jaundice can be an issue for some children and is often evaluated before your baby leaves the hospital, but sometimes it shows up after your baby is home. It usually appears as a yellowish tint to the skin.

"Jaundice is not uncommon in newborns. Often their bodies have not yet acquired the ability to excrete the yellow pigment called bilirubin in their stools.  The bilirubin level generally peaks by about 5 days for full term babies and about a week for those born prematurely.  However, if your baby continues to have very yellowish skin and eyes after about four days, talk to your pediatrician," Hester said.

New parents also need to be aware of warning signs of infection, she said. Infections may be picked up during birth or from people handling the baby.  While you don't have to hole up at home like a hermit,  it is important to use some common sense when going out in public. 

"Try to avoid crowded, enclosed spaces," Hester said, "and teach visitors and siblings to wash their hands before touching the baby. You might also encourage them to touch the baby on his or her feet as opposed to hands or face."

Warning signs of infection can include fever or low temperature, poor sucking during breastfeeding, rapid breathing, a lack of appetite, poor weight gain, weak crying and increased irritability.  Hester said if you notice changes in your baby that concern you, call your pediatrician's office right away.

Here are a few other helpful tips from OU Children's Physicians:

- Begin to establish a routine
When you first bring a newborn home, life can seem a bit chaotic. Your baby may have her days and nights mixed up, may have an erratic eating and sleeping schedule, which means you also find it difficult to eat, sleep or even shower.  But it's never too soon to begin trying to establish some routine. In fact, babies thrive on routine.  Because newborns will need to nurse on demand, it is nearly impossible to establish a mealtime routine.  Instead, begin to work on a simple bedtime routine. Pick a reasonable time – perhaps 7p.m. – and then choose just a few things you'd like to do every night. Put baby in pajamas, read or sing to baby, say a prayer or rock in the rocking chair. Keep the activity, your voice and the lights low. Soon your baby will begin to understand that nighttime is for sleeping and not playing.
 
- Realize that babies cry a lot
It's sometimes trying when you are faced with what may feel like non-stop crying at times, but remember crying is your baby's only way to communicate to you that he or she is hungry, cold, has a dirty diaper or simply wants to be held. If you find yourself getting frustrated, ask a family member or friend to give you a break. 
 
- Dry skin and other skin problems are not unusual
Many babies will have a bout of dry, flaky skin. Don't panic. It usually will be short lived. However, if it really bothers you, you can use some hypoallergenic, fragrance-free baby lotion. Other skin issues that can crop up in newborns include little pink bumps, diaper rash and baby acne. Most of these will also clear up on their own with time; but if you are concerned, talk to your pediatrician.

Bringing up baby can leave you feeling exhausted, emotional and a bit lonely, but remember those difficult early days will soon be behind you.

"Most first time moms and dads worry a lot. I think we all do a little better when the second child comes along," Hester said. "So try to enjoy those early days as much as you can. They will be gone before you know it."

If you have questions about caring for your newborn child or grandchild, Dr. Hester will be available for a live webchat at www.OUMedicine.com/chat this Friday,  April 5th at 10 a.m.

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QUICK NEWBORN TIPS
Time to Call the Doctor
Watch for these signs that it's time to call your pediatrician:
- Your newborn's breathing is faster or irregular
- You notice blueness or a darkness on the lips or face 
- Your newborn has a fever 
- Your newborn's body temperature has dropped
- You see signs of dehydration (less than 3 to 4 wet diapers in a 24-hour period)
- Your baby's belly button or circumcision area looks infected
- Your newborn's jaundice does not decrease by the fifth day 
- Your baby is crying a lot or appears sluggish
- You think your baby is not looking or feeling well

Choosing a Pediatrician
The following are a few questions to help you select a pediatrician:
- What are the office hours? Is emergency coverage available 24/7?
- Which hospital does the pediatrician use?
- Do they accept your insurance plan and how does the office process billing and claims?
- What are the qualifications of the pediatrician? Is he or she an AAP member (i.e., "FAAP," a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics)?

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1123Thu, 04 Apr 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Occupational Medicine Provider Joins OU Physicians Jon Petersen, M.D., M.P.H., has established his medical practice with OU Physicians.
     
Petersen is board certified in preventative medicine (occupational medicine) and family medicine. He works with organizations to manage and reduce work-related injuries and illness. He also performs pre-employment physical examinations, pulmonary function tests, hearing tests, lift testing and more.
     
Petersen completed a residency in occupational medicine at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore. He earned a master's degree in public health at Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. He completed a family practice residency at Eglin Hospital, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., and earned his medical degree from Marshall University, Huntington, W.V.
     
Petersen is a member of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, American Public Health Association and Aerospace Medical Association. He is also a member of the Oklahoma City Downtown Rotary Club.
     
OU Physicians Occupational Medicine is located on the OU Health Sciences Center campus at 825 N.E. 10th Street, Suite 2350, Oklahoma City. For more information, call (405) 271-WORK (9675).
     
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts.
     
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1118Tue, 02 Apr 2013 00:00:00 GMT
OU Researcher Finds Worrisome Trends in Teen Lifestyle ChoicesHeart disease and other cardiovascular issues are no longer only an issue for older Americans. New research reveals teens in this country are affected too.

The study was undertaken by a team of researchers headed by Christina Shay, Ph.D., of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.  They evaluated the health of America's teenagers, especially when it comes to their cardiovascular health.  "Almost all children are born in the state of ideal cardiovascular health," said Shay, a faculty member with the OU College of Public Health's Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology. 

However, she said the study reveals that during the teenage years those children frequently make unhealthy choices that negatively impact their cardiovascular health, including smoking, poor diet choices and a lack of physical activity.

The researchers combed through data found in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. The 2005-2010 surveys produced a "snapshot" of cardiovascular health among about 4600 children between the ages of 12 and 19. Shay said seven health behaviors and health factors define cardiovascular health.  These are:

- Smoking
- Body mass index (BMI)
- Healthy diet
- Physical activity
- Blood pressure
- Blood glucose
- Total cholesterol

Each of the children is rated on all seven factors as poor, intermediate or ideal.

The research found that virtually all teens fall short in the area of diet. In fact, none of the male teens had ideal healthy diet scores and only 0.1 percent of female teens had an ideal score.  In addition fewer than 50 percent of the teens achieved the ideal rating in five or more of the seven cardiovascular health measures.

Some of the results were less discouraging. Ideal blood pressure was generally high – 77.7 percent for male teens and 90.2 percent for females. About two-thirds of the teens had an ideal BMI and ideal smoking status too.  "Smoking rates are decreasing among teenage groups," says Dr. Shay, "but as we know there are higher rates of obesity, higher rates of sedentary activity and diets are becoming more unfavorable."  Overall, Shay's study reaches a gloomy conclusion. She said the low prevalence of ideal cardiovascular health behaviors in U.S. adolescents, particularly physical activity and dietary intake, will likely lead to worsening prevalence of obesity, hypertension, high cholesterol and high blood glucose levels as the current U.S. adolescent population reaches adulthood.

"If habits and behaviors don't change, these teens may develop cardiovascular disease at younger ages than previous generations," she said.

Advancing medical technology will likely mean that these teenagers who go on to develop cardiovascular disease will be able to live longer with the disease than previous generations.

"They could potentially still live as long or longer than their parents," Shay says, "but they'll likely experience a lower health-related quality of life as they age."  Shay says two things are needed to improve the bleak health outlook for teenagers today.  First, medical providers need to more strongly emphasize the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle to teenagers and their parents.  Second, a major shift in social and cultural concepts of disease prevention will be necessary.

"It's going to require support from parents, from families, from healthcare professionals--and even more complicated -- from industry, government and schools to truly affect change."

The research appears today in the online issue of the journal Circulation, a publication of the American Heart Association.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1117Tue, 02 Apr 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Diabetes Center Psychologist Selected as National Advisor for Native American InitiativeDr. Steve Sternlof, licensed psychologist with the Harold Hamm Diabetes Center at the University of Oklahoma, was recently nominated and selected as one of five national advisors for the Native American Centers for Excellence Service to Science Initiative.  The initiative matches health experts with tribal communities to help evaluate and implement programs that address community health concerns such as obesity and diabetes.

"The prevalence of diabetes in Native American tribal communities is alarming, and we have worked with them to identify the cause and to create sustainable programs to address this epidemic," said Blake Rambo, Chief Operating Officer of Harold Hamm Diabetes Center.  "Dr. Sternlof's presence on this advisory board is an example of an effective relationship between the Diabetes Center and communities that need urgent diabetes care."

When Dr. Sternlof is matched with a tribe, he will work with key tribal leaders to evaluate the health disparities of that tribe and to develop practical solutions that will generate healthy outcomes to the identified problem.  "A large part of my responsibility as an advisor is to not only implement programs focused on making people more healthy but to also work with the tribe to evaluate the effectiveness of programs already in place," Dr. Sternlof said.  "Through this program, tribal communities learn how to identify health concerns, address the issue in a meaningful way, and develop effective long-term strategies for maintaining a healthy and active community."

Harold Hamm's team of psychologists works with patients to cope with the difficulties associated with managing diabetes so they can make positive changes to their lives. For an appointment, call (405) 271-1000.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1108Thu, 28 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Cardiologist Joins OU Physicians Cardiologist Tarun W. Dasari, M.D., M.P.H., has established his medical practice with OU Physicians.
     
Dasari is board certified in internal medicine, cardiovascular diseases and nuclear cardiology. He sees patients with general heart conditions, advanced heart failure, atherosclerotic diseases and more. He performs transthoracic, trans-esophageal echocardiography and nuclear and echocardiographic stress tests (cardiac imaging studies).
     
Dasari completed a fellowship in heart transplantation and advanced heart failure at Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Ill., and in cardiovascular disease from the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where he also completed his residency and internship. He earned a master's degree in public health from the OU College of Public Health, and earned his medical degree from Osmania Medical College, Hyderabad, India.
     
Dasari sees patients on the OU Health Sciences Center campus at 825 N.E. 10th Street, suite 2500. For appointments, call (405) 271-7001.
     
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts.
     
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1109Wed, 27 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Plastic Surgeon Joins OU PhysiciansPlastic and Reconstructive Surgeon Joseph W. Michienzi, M.D., D.M.D., has established his practice with OU Physicians. He has also been named an assistant professor of surgery for the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.
     
Michienzi is board certified in plastic and reconstructive surgery and oral and maxillofacial surgery. He has a specific interest in craniofacial surgery, craniomaxillofacial reconstructive surgery and aesthetic facial plastic surgery.
     
Michienzi completed a fellowship in plastic surgery at the University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio. He completed fellowships in craniofacial surgery at the World Craniofacial Foundation, Dallas and Hôpital Necker – Enfants Malades, Paris, France. He served as chief resident for plastic and reconstructive surgery at the University of Texas Health Science Center and chief resident for oral and maxillofacial surgery at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, N.Y., N.Y.
     
Michienzi earned his medical degree at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Va., and a doctor of dental medicine from the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, Pittsburgh.
     
He is a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, World Craniofacial Foundation, Operation Smile and Small World Foundation.
     
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts.
     
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1100Tue, 26 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Pediatric Cancer Patients' Moms Shave Their Heads for Their KidsWorldwide, 175,000 children are diagnosed with cancer each year. In the U.S., more children die of childhood cancer than any other disease – more than AIDS, asthma, cystic fibrosis, congenital anomalies and diabetes combined.
     
A group of Oklahoma City women have joined together as "10 Strong" to help put a stop to this devastating disease by helping raise awareness and money for pediatric cancer research. Each of the women is the mother of a child who was diagnosed with cancer. The name "10 Strong" stems from the time spent on the 10th floor of OU Children's Physicians and The Children's Hospital, where the children's cancer clinic and hospital rooms are located.
     
On Sunday, March 24, each of these women will shave their heads during the St. Baldrick's Oklahoma City celebration. St. Baldrick's Foundation is a national fundraising organization for childhood cancer research. The women have a goal of raising $50,000 for the event.
     
On Friday, March 22, two of the women, shaved half their heads during a special event held at The Children's Hospital.
     
Rene McNall-Knapp, M.D., a pediatric cancer specialist at OU Children's Physicians, had her long brown hair shaved into a Mohawk and sprayed with bright temporary hair color. McNall is the mother of Jordan McNall-Knapp, a young cancer survivor whom she adopted. McNall-Knapp will donate her hair to an organization that makes wigs for cancer patients, including children.
     
The second mother is Teneil Spaeth, who is shaving her hair in memory of her daughter, Eden.
     
The two women will shave the rest of their heads on Sunday during the St. Baldrick's event.
     
Other members of 10 Strong and their children attending the media briefing included:
• Beth McDowell, team captain and daughter Mia
• Vanessa Hart and son Brock
• Jessica Garrett-Maynard and daughter Branagh Garrett
• Misshay Smith, mother of Shane, who could not attend the media briefing
• Trisha Adair and daughter Molly
• Jordan Keith and son Charlie
• Stephanie Butler and son Nathan
     
One other participating mom was not able to make it to the media briefing.
     
OU Medicine combines the research, education and health care expertise of OU Medical Center, The Children's Hospital, OU Physicians and the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine to establish Oklahoma's largest and most comprehensive health care system. With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group,  encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1099Tue, 26 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Luncheon Focuses on Making Children's Health Care a Priority in OklahomaChildren's Hospital Foundation hosted its annual legislative luncheon at the State Capitol on Tuesday, March 5th. The educational luncheon focused on the importance of legislative support for children's medical research and treatment in Oklahoma.  The luncheon demonstrated what Children's Hospital Foundation is doing to raise the bar for the health of our state's children.

Attendees of the luncheon included Chip Keating, CHF Board member-Public Affairs Chairman; Laurie Givens, CHF Board President; Lieutenant Governor, Todd Lamb; State Representative, Jason Nelson and many other Oklahoma legislators eager to aide in the improvement of Oklahoma's pediatric healthcare. Dr. Terrence Stull, Scientific Director and Chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at OU Medical Center spoke about legislature power in the lives of Oklahoma's children.

Miracle child Martina, who is dedicated to speaking and raising awareness for Children's Hospital Foundation, attended the luncheon and met with her county's representative, Senator Tom Ivester. The amazing story of hope, that is Martina's life, inspired all who were in attendance.

"By engaging legislators, we help raise awareness on a much larger scale," said Kathy McCracken, Children's Hospital Foundation Executive Director. "With their help we can create and promote the growth and development of Oklahoma pediatrics."

Children's Hospital Foundation has gone from ten million dollars in endowed programs in 1999 to over sixty million today because of The Oklahoma State Matching Funds Program. These funds created the opportunity for the recruitment of thirty-six pediatric research specialty positions. With the continued support from our state legislators, Children's Hospital Foundation will be able to continue to raise the bar for the care of Oklahoma's children.
               
Children's Hospital Foundation helps to fund pediatric research, education and clinical care, ultimately supporting The Children's Hospital in serving every county in Oklahoma with more than 162,000 annual patient visits.  All funds raised through Children's Hospital Foundation stay in Oklahoma so children will have access to exceptional pediatric specialists without having to leave the state.  Despite dedicated and steady progress, there are still obstacles in the quest to combat pediatric illness and disability. Children's Hospital Foundation continues to raise funds to aide in the advancement of treatment and care for the children of our state.

For more information about Children's Hospital Foundation visit www.okchf.org.

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ABOUT US:             
Children's Hospital Foundation, proud affiliate of Children's Miracle Network Hospitals, is a nonprofit 501c (3) organization in Oklahoma improving the health of children. Since its inception in 1983, Children's Hospital Foundation, through its volunteer board and vast community support, has funded pediatric research, education and clinical programs including collaborative projects with the OU Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center, OU Children's Physicians and the University Hospitals Authority and Trust.  For more information, contact Executive Director, Kathy McCracken at 405.650.1718 or visit our website: www.okchf.org.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1098Mon, 25 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Teens and VaccinesWith several new vaccines known to be a safe and effective way to protect against a number of adolescent diseases, why are many teens still not getting the recommended vaccinations?  New research out of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center provides important answers.

"Since 2005, three new vaccines recommended for adolescents have been licensed and approved for use, but we are not achieving our national goals," said study author Dr. Paul Darden of the Department of Pediatrics, OU College of Medicine. 

The three vaccines are Tdap (tetanus toxoid, diptheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccine), a vaccine for meningitis - MCV4 (quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine), and the vaccine for HPV (human papilloma virus).

The research analyzed data from the 2008-2010 National Immunization Survey of Teens by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The goal was to determine why parents did not have their teens up to date on recommended vaccinations, and how these reasons have changed over the years.  "One of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Healthy People 2020 goals is to attain vaccination rates of 90 percent, but the reality falls short of that goal," Darden said.

Some increases in vaccination rates were noted. For instance, Tdap vaccination rates improved from 72.2 percent in 2008 to 81.2 percent in 2010 and MCV4 vaccination rates over the same period rose from 41.8 percent to 62.7 percent. However, the percentage of adolescent females immunized with the HPV vaccine remains much lower, climbing from 17.9 percent to only 32 percent during the same three years. "While we're seeing increases, those increases are uneven with some vaccines more widely accepted than others," Darden said, adding the low rate of HPV immunization (which is now recommended for adolescent boys too) is especially concerning.

"HPV is a vaccine that prevents cervical cancer, a serious health condition in women. So it's worrisome that adolescents are not getting the HPV vaccine."  To find out why adolescents are not receiving these vaccinations, even though physicians commonly recommend them,  Darden and six fellow researchers analyzed parent survey data.  "Our goal was to understand how adolescents and their parents make decisions around adolescent vaccines, to gain better insights into parents' concerns and to discover how doctors should best approach adolescents and their parents to help them make these decisions," Darden said.  Researchers learned that when it comes to the Tdap and MCV4 vaccines, parents generally gave several reasons for not having their teenaged children immunized. These include:
1) The vaccination was "not recommended" by their physician
2) They believed it was "not necessary" to have the vaccination
3) They didn't know enough about the vaccine
 
In the case of the HPV vaccine, parents gave the same reasons for failing to vaccinate their teens, but they added some additional reasons as well. One of those was that their child was not yet sexually active and therefore did not need the vaccine. Darden said that reveals that some parents are laboring under a misapprehension about the vaccine. "Getting the infection is related to having sex," he said. "The problem is, of course, once a person is having sex, they may become infected with HPV and the vaccine is only effective when given before infection. This vaccine is most effective if given prior to initiation of sexual activity."

Another reason parents gave for not having their child receive the HPV vaccine related to concerns about the vaccine's safety and potential side effects. The study found that concern had increased almost four-fold in three years.

"In addition, despite their doctors increasingly recommending the HPV vaccine, parents' intent to not vaccinate for HPV also increased," Darden said.

In 2008, 39.8 percent of parents were intent on not vaccinating their teens for HPV. In 2010, that number rose to 43.9.

Currently, in Oklahoma, only the Tdap vaccination is required for entry into middle school.  The meningitis and HPV vaccines, though recommended, are not mandatory.

Darden said that despite the clear health benefits of these vaccines, it is unlikely the HPV vaccine would be made mandatory. Darden and his colleagues believe the study points to the importance of better educating families and health care providers about the safety and effectiveness of vaccines. Researchers said such a campaign might also directly target teens with education through social media.

The study, "Reasons for Not Vaccinating Adolescents: National Survey of Teens, 2008-2010," was published online today and also will appear in the April issue of Pediatrics.

This study was funded by grant R40 MC 21522 through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Research Program.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1097Mon, 25 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Roundup Shindig Raises More Than $145,000 for Oklahoma's ChildrenOn Saturday, February 9 hundreds of Oklahomans came together to help fight life-threatening pediatric illnesses. The 3rd Annual Roundup Shindig was held at Riverwind Casino Showplace Theatre where over $145,000 was raised to benefit Children's Hospital Foundation.

"The 2013 Roundup Shindig was a great event and will be remembered by all who attended," said Kathy McCracken, Children's Hospital Foundation Executive Director. "The funds raised by the event support research, education and clinical care for Oklahoma's children."

This year guests enjoyed a live and silent auction, appearances from Miracle Children, a succulent western dinner, dancing and live music from The Jason Savory Band.

Roundup Shindig is well-known for its enticing western items featured in the auctions. A night of exuberant auction bidding resulted in several thousand dollars being raised. Two commemorative George Washington Flintlock dueling pistols, an antique western saddle, custom cowboy hat from Shorty's Caboy Hattery, a round of golf at Oak Tree National with Brandon Weeden and a complete 2013 embryo transfer donated by Royal Vista Southwest were just some of the most wanted auction items.

Roundup Shindig is truly a reflection of the devotion, talent and compassion of Oklahoma's equine and agriculture industry. Led by Event Chair Vicki Tebow, this year's Roundup Shindig was a night to remember.

"To see a room full of horseman from every discipline and breed, come together for such a great cause is the most heartwarming thing," said Vicki Tebow, event chair. "The children of Oklahoma are our future and we are lucky to have a state-of-the-art hospital right here in Oklahoma for them!"

The 2013 Roundup Shindig was sponsored by Riverwind Casino, OU Medicine, Betting On A Cure, Eventures, Silver Wind Stables, Neff Hogue Farm, Royal Vista Southwest, Teners, Future Fortunes, Blue Dolphin Energy, James Ranch, L.L.C., Thoroughbred Racing Association of Oklahoma, Heritage Place, Jud Little Ranch, Oklahoma Quarter Horse Racing Association, Keating Investments, Hayes Legal Group P.C., Row & Hays Quarter Horses, Oklahoma Quarter Horse Association, QuikPrint, Speedhorse Magazine, Santa Fe Tag, Cleveland Hospital, Kings Worldwide Transportation, Newcastle Gaming, Chirping Frog Farms, L.L.C and Bobby Joe and Renee Jane Cudd Quarter Horses, L.L.C.

Children's Hospital Foundation helps to fund pediatric research, education and clinical care, ultimately supporting The Children's Hospital in serving every county in Oklahoma with more than 162,000 annual patient visits.  All funds raised through Children's Hospital Foundation stay in Oklahoma so children will have access to exceptional pediatric specialists without having to leave the state.  Despite dedicated and steady progress, there are still obstacles in the quest to combat pediatric illness and disability. 
To support the Roundup Shindig and Children's Hospital Foundation, contact Kati at 405.271.2550 or visit www.okchf.org.

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ABOUT US:             
Children's Hospital Foundation, proud affiliate of Children's Miracle Network Hospitals, is a nonprofit 501c (3) organization in Oklahoma improving the health of children. Since its inception in 1983, Children's Hospital Foundation, through its volunteer board and vast community support, has funded pediatric research, education and clinical programs including collaborative projects with the OU Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center, OU Children's Physicians and the University Hospitals Authority and Trust.  For more information, contact Executive Director, Kathy McCracken at 405.650.1718 or visit our website: www.okchf.org.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1096Mon, 25 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Children's Hospital Foundation Announces New Board MembersChildren's Hospital Foundation announces the appointment of five new board members to their 2013 Board of Directors. Comprised of leading executives, attorneys and community leaders, to name a few, these new members will guide Children's Hospital Foundation into its next phase of growth and development.

"The staff and current board of CHF are happy to welcome our new board members from all over the Oklahoma City metro," said Kathy McCracken, Children's Hospital Foundation Executive Director. "By engaging new leaders, we can create and promote new ideas for the growth and development of Oklahoma pediatrics. The new members bring us a wealth of expertise in business and community involvement."

The new members of the 2013 Board of Directors are Dan Boren, David Elder, Liz McLaughlin, Jenny Love Meyer and Ross Plourde.

Dan Boren, president of corporate development with the Chickasaw Nation, will serve on the finance committee for the CHF Board of Directors. As a retired politician who served as the U.S. Representative for Oklahoma's 2nd congressional district, Boren brings a tremendous amount of experience with him to the Foundation.

David Elder, attorney at Hartzog, Conger, Cason & Neville will contribute to the leadership role of implementing the development plan for the Foundation. His strength in leadership will benefit his role on the development committee.

Liz McLaughlin is a distinguished community volunteer who will serve on the Foundation's development committee. The McLaughlin Family Foundation recently gave a generous donation to CHF to endow the CMRI McLaughlin Family Chair in genetics. The support, devotion and benevolence of Liz and her family will make large strides in the development of the Foundation.

Jenny Love Meyer, vice president of communications for Love's Travel Stops, oversees public and media relations, internal communications, community relations and charitable giving for the Love's family of companies. Jenny spearheads the annual Love's fundraising campaign for Children's Miracle Network Hospitals and will be a strong leader on the Children's Hospital Foundation development committee.

Ross Plourde, attorney at McAfee & Taft will serve on the CHF Development Committee. Plourde practices primarily in the areas of commercial litigation and arbitration, commercial law and bankruptcy. His dedication to the community is strong and he will no doubt be a great asset to the Foundation.

The five new board members join a twenty-member board that oversees Children's Hospital Foundation's finances, grant marketing policies and practices and statewide outreach.
                               
Children's Hospital Foundation helps to fund pediatric research, education and clinical care, ultimately supporting The Children's Hospital in serving every county in Oklahoma with more than 162,000 annual patient visits.  All funds raised through Children's Hospital Foundation stay in Oklahoma so children will have access to exceptional pediatric specialists without having to leave the state.  Despite dedicated and steady progress, there are still obstacles in the quest to combat pediatric illness and disability. Children's Hospital Foundation will continue to raise funds to aide in the advancement of treatment and care for the children of our state.

For more information about Children's Hospital Foundation visit www.okchf.org.

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ABOUT US:             
Children's Hospital Foundation, proud affiliate of Children's Miracle Network Hospitals, is a nonprofit 501c (3) organization in Oklahoma improving the health of children. Since its inception in 1983, Children's Hospital Foundation, through its volunteer board and vast community support, has funded pediatric research, education and clinical programs including collaborative projects with the OU Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center, OU Children's Physicians and the University Hospitals Authority and Trust.  For more information, contact Executive Director, Kathy McCracken at 405.650.1718 or visit our website: www.okchf.org.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1094Fri, 22 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Geriatrician Joins OU PhysiciansGeriatrician Andrew Dentino, M.D., has established his medical practice with OU Physicians. Geriatricians provide health care services specific to seniors just as pediatricians specialize in health needs specific to children.
     
Dentino is board certified in internal medicine, geriatric medicine, hospice and palliative medicine, general psychiatry and geriatric psychiatry. He comes to OU Physicians from Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, where he was chief of the division of geriatric and palliative medicine for the College of Medicine and director of clinical geriatrics for the Institute on Aging. He was also executive medical director of the Mildred and Shirley L. Garrison Center for Geriatric Education and Care in Lubbock.
     
Dentino completed a fellowship in geriatric medicine at Duke University Medical Center, Durham, N.C. He completed an internship and residency in internal medicine and psychiatry and served as chief resident in psychiatry at West Virginia University Hospitals, Morgantown. He earned his medical degree at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, N.Y., N.Y.
     
He is a member of the American Board of Hospice & Palliative Medicine, the American Board of Forensic Medicine and the American Medical Directors Association.
     
In addition to seeing patients, OU Physicians geriatricians at The Donald W. Reynolds Department of Geriatric Medicine at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine also teach other physicians about specialized care for seniors at the OU College of Medicine.
     
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts.
     
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1093Fri, 22 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMT
OU Students Go Above and Beyond for Oklahoma's KidsThe 17th Annual Soonerthon, held on Saturday, March 9th, raised a record-breaking $196,034 to benefit Children's Hospital Foundation. Over 1,500 University of Oklahoma Students came together ‘For the Kids' and almost doubled the amount of funds raised by the event in 2012. 

"Soonerthon is fast becoming one of the top Dance Marathons in the nation, pushing into the top 15 of over 150 nationwide," said John Fraser, Soonerthon Overall Chair. "We hope to continue improving our event and consistently developing all of our students to help raise money for the kids."

While nonstop dancing kept the students entertained, interaction and activities with Miracle Children kept them inspired. For twelve straight hours, students participated in color wars, a miracle kids talent show, line dances and a children's carnival just to name a few.

While the participants of Soonerthon strive to set record breaking totals, they never lose sight of the true purpose of the event, which is to stand for kids who can't. Soonerthon is able to raise wide-spread awareness for Children's Miracle Network Hospitals and all the families with children that are impacted by life-threatening illnesses.

Soonerthon is Oklahoma's largest student-run philanthropic event and is the culmination of year-round fundraising efforts to benefit Oklahoma's children. To continue to support Soonerthon, text CMN4KIDS to 50555 and a $5 donation will be charged to your next phone bill.

Soonerthon is sponsored by Love's Travel Stops, American Fidelity, BancFirst, Coca-Cola, Student Alumni Association, Sanicola Family, Louie's Bar & Grill, Fuzzy's Taco's, President's Office, Office of Provost, Seven47 and Housing and Food.

For more information on Soonerthon, visit www.okchf.org or contact Linzy Hall, CMN Hospitals Senior Development Officer, at 405-271-2208 or linzy-hall@ouhsc.edu

Children's Miracle Network Hospitals is an international non-profit organization dedicated to helping children by raising funds and awareness while keeping 100 percent of donations in the community where they are raised.  Children's Hospital Foundation is a proud affiliate of CMN Hospitals and is dedicated to providing funding for pediatric programs in research, education and clinical care for Oklahoma's children. 

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ABOUT US:             
Children's Hospital Foundation, proud affiliate of Children's Miracle Network Hospitals, is a nonprofit 501c (3) organization in Oklahoma improving the health of children. Since its inception in 1983, Children's Hospital Foundation, through its volunteer board and vast community support, has funded pediatric research, education and clinical programs including collaborative projects with the OU Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center, OU Children's Physicians and the University Hospitals Authority and Trust.  For more information, contact Executive Director, Kathy McCracken at 405.650.1718 or visit our website: www.okchf.org.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1095Fri, 22 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Sun Safety Tips for Spring Break https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1084Thu, 14 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMTOKState Dance Marathon Raises $45,583 for Oklahoma's KidsFrom choreographed dances and date auctions to limbo, many moments defined the 2nd Annual OKState Dance Marathon, a Children's Miracle Network Hospitals event benefiting Children's Hospital Foundation. On Saturday, February 23, more than 700 Oklahoma State University students threw on their favorite flair and danced for twelve straight hours to raise $45,583 for Oklahoma's children.

"When a group of energetic, enthusiastic, creative, motivated, vision minded and competitive Oklahoma State University students join together it is amazing what they can accomplish," said Jan Dunham, CMN Hospitals Director. "We appreciate the dedicated hard work of the Committee and are grateful to the valued sponsors and everyone that was involved with this event. OSU students are making a huge impact in the health of Oklahoma children."

Dancers stayed energized with dodge ball and basketball championships, a photo booth, a silent auction and a date auction, to name a few. While nonstop dancing kept the students entertained, interaction and activities with Miracle Children kept them inspired.

Although the Marathon was a twelve-hour celebration, it is actually the culmination of year-round fundraising efforts to benefit Oklahoma's sick children. To continue to support OSU Dance Marathon, text CMN4KIDS to 50555 and a $5 donation will be charged to your next phone bill. All Mobile Giving donations will be added to the grand total.

OKState Dance Marathon is sponsored by Kicker, Daddy O's Music, Orange Tech, Fuzzy's and Jimmy John's.

For more information on OKState Dance Marathon, visit www.okchf.org or contact Linzy Hall, CMN Hospitals Senior Development Officer, at 405-271-2208 or linzy-hall@ouhsc.edu

Children's Miracle Network Hospitals is an international non-profit organization dedicated to helping children by raising funds and awareness while keeping 100 percent of donations in the community where they are raised.  Children's Hospital Foundation is a proud affiliate of CMN Hospitals and is dedicated to providing funding for pediatric programs in research, education and clinical care for Oklahoma's children. 

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ABOUT US:             
Children's Hospital Foundation, proud affiliate of Children's Miracle Network Hospitals, is a nonprofit 501c (3) organization in Oklahoma improving the health of children. Since its inception in 1983, Children's Hospital Foundation, through its volunteer board and vast community support, has funded pediatric research, education and clinical programs including collaborative projects with the OU Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center, OU Children's Physicians and the University Hospitals Authority and Trust.  For more information, contact Executive Director, Kathy McCracken at 405.650.1718 or visit our website: www.okchf.org.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1078Mon, 11 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Credit Unions for Kids Sign Installed in Children's HospitalOklahoma City Credit Unions for Kids-Boomer Sooner Chapter has pledged a gift of $1 million over the next five years to help transform the health of Oklahoma's children by funding pediatric research, clinical care and education.

In honor of their $1 million gift to Children's Hospital Foundation, the second floor, home to pediatric cardiology, in the OU Children's Physicians Building, owned and operated by University Hospitals Authority and Trust, will permanently and proudly bear the Credit Unions for Kids name.

"We have been dedicated to raising funds for Children's Miracle Network Hospitals since 1997," said Steve Rasmussen, CEO and President of FAA Credit Union. "Since that time, the area credit unions have raised over two million dollars for this worthwhile cause, ranking us tenth in the nation. Naming the floor gives us a great opportunity to demonstrate our long term commitment to the children of Oklahoma."

The generosity of Oklahoma City Credit Unions for Kids is laying the foundation for the next generation and their donation will make large strides in improving the health of Oklahoma's children. To celebrate this gift, a floor dedication and check presentation ceremony will be held on Friday, March 15th at noon on the second floor of the Children's Atrium in the Children's Hospital.

Because of funds raised by Oklahoma partners like Credit Unions, kids like Parker have the best in specialty care. Parker was born with numerous heart issues including Tetralogy of Fallot, an absent pulmonary valve, pulmonary stenosis and pulmonary regurgitation. He had his first heart surgery to repair branches of the heart when he was four weeks old and developed an infection soon after. He endured a six hour open heart surgery at six weeks old where he was placed on the heart bypass machine twice. At eight years old, Parker underwent a second open heart surgery. Today he is a happy ten year old with an infectious personality.

"Credit Unions for Kids has made such a long term contribution and created such a sustaining impact on the well-being of the children of our community," said Dr. Terrence Stull, CMRI Patricia Price Browne Distinguished Chair. "I am very pleased to be able to recognize their contribution."

Credit Unions for Kids is a nonprofit collaboration of Credit Unions, chapters and business partners, engaged in fundraising activities to benefit 170 Children's Miracle Network Hospitals across the nation and Canada. One hundred percent of every dollar donated by members of the credit unions movement in our community benefits Children's Hospital Foundation to ensure that Oklahoma's children receive the best pediatric care in their home state.

In 2012, Oklahoma City Credit Unions collectively raised over $191,000 for Credit Unions for Kids. The volunteer committee coordinates a variety of fundraisers including the Tinker Federal Credit Union Miracle Car Show, Boomer Sooner Golf Classic, the FAA Credit Union Fall Open Charity Golf Tournament, branch fundraisers and custom fundraising events such as Oklahoma Employees Credit Union's Sugar & Spurs and a Courage Cruise motorcycle poker run hosted by University and Community Federal Credit Union.
               
Children's Hospital Foundation helps to fund pediatric research, education and clinical care, ultimately supporting The Children's Hospital in serving every county in Oklahoma with more than 162,000 annual patient visits.  All funds raised through Children's Hospital Foundation stay in Oklahoma so children will have access to exceptional pediatric specialists without having to leave the state.  Despite dedicated and steady progress, there are still obstacles in the quest to combat pediatric illness and disability. 

To support Children's Hospital Foundation visit www.okchf.org. For more information about Credit Unions for Kids please contact Jeremy Daggs, Director of Marketing for University and Community Federal Credit Unions and Oklahoma CU4Kids Chairperson at 405-533-5171 or jdaggs@cuintouch.com

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ABOUT US:       
Children's Hospital Foundation, proud affiliate of Children's Miracle Network Hospitals, is a nonprofit 501c (3) organization in Oklahoma improving the health of children. Since its inception in 1983, Children's Hospital Foundation, through its volunteer board and vast community support, has funded pediatric research, education and clinical programs including collaborative projects with the OU Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center, OU Children's Physicians and the University Hospitals Authority and Trust.  For more information, contact Executive Director, Kathy McCracken at 405.650.1718 or visit our website: www.okchf.org.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1077Mon, 11 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Teenagers at RiskThe teenage years are fraught with peril and risk, and just about everyone--parents, teachers, community leaders--would like to know how best to discourage teens from engaging in risky behavior. Now, results of a decade-long study by researchers at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center may point the way.

Roy Oman, Ph.D., and fellow researchers at the OU College of Public Health have just completed the Youth Asset Study, a 10-year research project aimed at learning what assets help teens avoid risky behavior.
 
Risky behavior in teens comes in many forms, including alcohol use, drug use, violence, weapon carrying, gang affiliations. However, Oman said the study found the most worrisome example of high risk behavior among teens is sexual activity resulting in pregnancy.

"Of the industrialized nations in the world, the United States has by far the highest teen pregnancy and teen birth rates," Oman said. "And then when you look at the states, Oklahoma has the fifth highest teen birth rate in the country."

To establish scientifically what factors or "assets" can help teens avoid engaging in risky behavior, the researchers conducted interviews with more than 1000 teens in their homes, as well as with their parents.

An analysis of the data found strong associations between certain assets and risk avoidance. "The strongest factor of all to avoid teen pregnancy was school connectedness," Oman said. By that he means teenage girls felt safe, happy, close to others and that they were treated fairly at their school.

"Among girls who felt connected to their school and trusted someone at school, they had almost a 50 percent lesser chance of becoming pregnant compared to those girls who did not have that particular asset," he said.

In addition, the Youth Asset Study discovered other assets that deterred teens from sexual activity, pregnancy and non-use of birth control. These included a youth's ability to make responsible choices and the presence of a non-parental role model in the teen's life.

"If they had any of those two assets, they were protected from all three risk behaviors," Oman said. Oman pointed out that the study found family assets are important too.  These include parental monitoring, mother and father relationships with the teen and open lines of communication. Interestingly, the study also discovered that while underlying family values are no doubt present among these assets, they need not be made explicit.

"A child can have a strong asset like parent-child communication and it protects them from all these risk behaviors. And yet, none of the communication is about not doing these risk behaviors," he said.

The research found religion also can play a role in avoidance of high risk behaviors. "Religiosity" (strongly held personal religious beliefs) is an asset highly associated with non-initiation of sexual activity. So is investment of time in religious activities, though only for non-Hispanic white youth.  Prior to the Youth Asset Study, most efforts at risk prevention focused solely on the individual teen. But Dr. Oman believes the survey shows a need for a broader-based approach.

"We need to focus at least as much on parents and on the community environment as we do on youth when we try to prevent risk behaviors and promote positive behaviors," Oman said, adding that it's time to begin the "hard work" of getting parents, even reluctant parents, more involved in their child's life. "I would never give up on the family," Oman said, "but even if the family is not fully functional, you could still then work at the community level, especially at schools, to try to improve the outcomes there."

The findings of the Youth Asset Study have just been published online by the Journal of Adolescent Health. Other OU College of Public Health researchers involved in the study include Sara Vesely, Ph.D., Cheryl Aspy, Ph.D., and Eleni Tolma, Ph.D.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1067Wed, 06 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Psychiatrist Joins OU PhysiciansHennessey native Vincel "Ray" Cordry, Jr., D.O., a board-certified psychiatrist, has established his practice with OU Physicians. He has also been named an associate professor with the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. Psychiatrists are medical doctors specifically trained in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mental, emotional and behavioral disorders.
 
Cordry is board certified in psychiatry. He has practiced psychiatry in several Oklahoma cities, including Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Enid, Lawton, Woodward and others. He has worked with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services and served as psychiatry department chairman at Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Tulsa.
     
Cordry completed his residency at the University of Kansas School of Medicine, Wichita. He earned his doctor of osteopathic medicine from the Kansas City College of Osteopathic Medicine, Kansas City. He earned his bachelor's degree at Phillips University in Enid.
     
Cordry is a member of the American Osteopathic Association, Oklahoma Osteopathic Association, American Psychiatric Association, Oklahoma Psychiatric Physicians Association and the American College of Osteopathic Neurologists and Psychiatrists.
     
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts.
     
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center and in Edmond, Enid and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1066Mon, 04 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Soonerthon Hosts Top-notch Celebration for Oklahoma's KidsMore than 1,500 University of Oklahoma students will come together on Saturday, March 9 at the 17th Annual Campus Activities Council Soonerthon. Participants will create a dynamic 12-hour experience that will change lives and raise money to benefit Children's Hospital Foundation through Children's Miracle Network Hospitals.  The celebration will be held at the Huston Huffman Fitness Center from 10 a.m. to 7:45 p.m. then will move to the Jim Thorpe Multicultural Center where the event will end at 10 p.m.

A children's carnival, miracle kids talent show, color wars, Crimson Chaos, line dances and dare wars will be included in the twelve-hour Marathon. The evening will conclude with the exciting announcement of the total funds raised by the students throughout the year.

"Last year, Soonerthon raised over $105,000 for Children's Hospital Foundation," said John Fraser, Soonerthon Overall Chair. "Soonerthon is fast becoming one of the top Dance Marathons in the nation, pushing into the top 15 out of over 150 nationwide. We pride ourselves on never forgetting what our true purpose is, and who it is we serve. Everything we do is FTK, 'For The Kids'!"

In 2012, Children's Hospital had over 162,000 patient visits, 13,335 of which were from Cleveland County. Soonerthon helps raise awareness about the importance of research, education and clinical care for children like Maddison, a Cleveland County resident.

Maddison was born with four major heart defects and severe lung defects, causing pulmonary hypertension. She has undergone multiple procedures to repair her heart and provide blood to her lungs. Several more procedures will be necessary to increase the size of her lung arteries and lower the pressure in her lungs.
Because of donations like Soonerthon, Maddison is able to receive top-notch care from world renowned physician-scientists right here in Oklahoma at The Children's Hospital. Maddison loves to sing and play her guitar and will be performing in the miracle kid talent show at Soonerthon.

Soonerthon is sponsored by Love's Travel Stops, American Fidelity, BancFirst, Coca-Cola, Student Alumni Association, Sanicola Family, Louie's Bar & Grill, Fuzzy's Taco's, President's Office, Office of Provost, Seven47 and Housing and Food.

To continue to support Soonerthon, text CMN4KIDS to 50555 and a $5 donation will be charged to your next phone bill. All Mobile Giving donations will be added to the grand total.

For more information on Soonerthon, visit www.okchf.org or contact Linzy Hall, CMN Hospitals Senior Development Officer, at 405-271-2208 or linzy-hall@ouhsc.edu

Children's Miracle Network Hospitals is an international non-profit organization dedicated to helping children by raising funds and awareness while keeping 100 percent of donations in the community where they are raised.  Children's Hospital Foundation is a proud affiliate of CMN Hospitals and is dedicated to providing funding for pediatric programs in research, education and clinical care for Oklahoma's children. 

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ABOUT US:             
Children's Hospital Foundation, proud affiliate of Children's Miracle Network Hospitals, is a nonprofit 501c (3) organization in Oklahoma improving the health of children. Since its inception in 1983, Children's Hospital Foundation, through its volunteer board and vast community support, has funded pediatric research, education and clinical programs including collaborative projects with the OU Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center, OU Children's Physicians and the University Hospitals Authority and Trust.  For more information, contact Executive Director, Kathy McCracken at 405.650.1718 or visit our website: www.okchf.org.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1064Mon, 04 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMT
February Employee of the MonthThe OUHSC Staff Senate is pleased to announce the February 2013 Employee of the Month.

Leah R. Lewis

Accountant
Peggy & Charles Stephenson Cancer Center

 

Here are a few excerpts from her nomination letters:

“She is trustworthy, dependable, and always willing to fill in and assist the whole administrative team even if the task isn’t ‘her job’”

“She comes to work every day with a smile on her face."

“She is patient, extremely knowledgeable, detailed, and just downright pleasant.”

“She is the epitome of integrity and loyalty in her personal life and career.”

“Leah will go above and beyond what is needed to ensure the job is done with as much accuracy as possible, and not afraid to ask questions along the way to better the project.”

“She is patient and an excellent listener but mainly she is an extremely hard worker and very dedicated to what she does.”


Leah’s reception will be
Friday, March 1st at 3:00 p.m.
Cancer Center, 5th Floor Lobby

Congratulations Leah!

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1028Mon, 11 Feb 2013 00:00:00 GMT
OU Dean of Pharmacy Earns National Leadership AwardJoLaine R. Draugalis, dean of the University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy, is the 2013 recipient of a national leadership award presented by The Pharmacy Leadership Society.

"The University family congratulates Dean Draugalis on this well-deserved recognition," said OU President David L. Boren.  "Her leadership has focused national attention on the excellence of OU’s pharmacy program."

The annual award is bestowed on an individual who exemplifies leadership qualities in support of the pharmacy profession and has demonstrated "servant leadership" in areas such as education, associated work, community service, professional practice or mentoring.
 
Draugalis, who also is a David Ross Boyd Professor, will be presented the society’s highest individual award, the 2013 Phi Lambda Sigma – Proctor & Gamble National Leadership Award on March 2 at a ceremony in Los Angeles, Calif. 
 
"I cannot think of a more worthy individual," said M. Dewayne Andrews, M.D., MACP, senior vice president and provost of the OU Health Sciences Center and executive dean of the OU College of Medicine.   "Dean Draugalis exemplifies what it is to be a servant leader. She is devoted to advancing the field through the education of tomorrow’s pharmacists."
 
Draugalis was selected for the award by the Pharmacy Leadership Society executive committee. Her own faculty members led the effort to nominate her.
 
"I am honored and surprised, because I didn't even know I was nominated," said Draugalis of the award. "It just inspires me to keep contributing to the profession and to encourage others to do so as well."

Draugalis has been dean of the OU College of Pharmacy since 2007 and is a Fellow of the American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Pharmaceutical Research and Science. 

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1053Fri, 22 Feb 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Delta Dental of Oklahoma Oral Health Foundation Makes Largest Single Gift Ever to OU College of DentistryUniversity of Oklahoma President David L. Boren announced today that Delta Dental of Oklahoma Oral Health Foundation has made the largest single gift ever to the OU College of Dentistry – a $3.2 million lead gift toward the renovation of the college's building.

The gift is part of the $20 million Legacy Project capital campaign, the largest private fundraising effort in the college's history, to create a state-of-the-art facility to train tomorrow's dental professionals.  The Delta Dental gift increases to $9.6 million the funding raised to date toward the first phase of renovating the dentistry building.

"The entire University is deeply grateful for the exceptional gifts by Delta Dental of Oklahoma to the College of Dentistry," said OU President David L. Boren.  "It is truly a transformative gift which will help keep our college among the very best in the nation."

Boren noted that in appreciation of the gift, he is recommending that the OU Board of Regents name the dentistry building's Comprehensive Care Clinics Floor for Delta Dental of Oklahoma Oral Health Foundation.

 "Our business and our Oral Health Foundation depend on having a supply of the best trained dentists throughout the state," said John Gladden, president and CEO of Delta Dental of Oklahoma. "Having a dental school in our state means we have more dentists across the state, which positively impacts the oral health of our population. Our gift – which is the largest in our history and will be disbursed over a 10-year period – is both an endorsement of the quality of education provided by the OU College of Dentistry, as well as support of new technologies and the teamwork approach for better oral care in the future."

The College of Dentistry building, located on Stonewall Avenue in Oklahoma City, has been home to OU's dentistry students, faculty, and staff since 1976.  During that time, only minor renovations and technology upgrades have been made to the facility.

"These significant renovations will ensure the college remains competitive with other national dental schools in technology and contribute to further enhancing the overall quality of oral health care in this region," said Stephen K. Young, DDS, dean of the OU College of Dentistry. "These renovations will help to meet the growing and evolving needs of our students and ensure that the College of Dentistry continues its tradition of providing an outstanding, challenging education and state-of-the-art training environment."

The Comprehensive Care Clinics Floor will be a cornerstone of the renovation project and will support the College of Dentistry's comprehensive care clinical approach to dental education by giving students a real-world professional environment in which to work and learn.

The Comprehensive Care Clinics Floor will be composed of three clinics, which will be remodeled into nine comprehensive group practices. These practices will consist of a group of students led by faculty mentors, with students spending an entire semester in a single practice, coordinating each aspect of a patient's oral health care as they would in a practice setting. Because patients will be assigned to a group practice, seeing the same student practitioners, they will be able to complete treatment more quickly and efficiently.

Architectural firm Bockus Payne Associates Architects will oversee the renovation.

Other areas to undergo extensive refurbishment during the first phase include the first-floor commons, reception area and foyer, student locker rooms and lounge. A new grand atrium also will be added to the first floor and will open onto the existing courtyard.

Planned future construction phases will include renovation to various specialty clinic areas, including those supporting periodontics, orthodontics, endodontic and pedodontic training.

Headquartered in Oklahoma City, Delta Dental of Oklahoma serves more than 700,000 eligible members in more than 3,000 companies. Delta Dental of Oklahoma has contributed millions of dollars to dental health- and education-related programs through its foundation.  In addition to the $3.2 million for capital support, Delta Dental has provided more than $1.6 million to the College of Dentistry for scholarships, equipment and technology needs, and community service opportunities, including providing care for uninsured and underinsured populations.

The OU College of Dentistry is home to the state's only doctor of dental surgery program and baccalaureate degree program in dental hygiene. More than 60 percent of Oklahoma's dentists are graduates of the OU College of Dentistry. The college provides general dental care and specialty care to Oklahomans through student, resident and faculty practice clinics.

Since the first class of dentistry students began their studies in 1972, the OU College of Dentistry has established a reputation of training its students to provide the highest quality of clinical care available. The training program provides students with extensive opportunities to learn and develop proficiency through practice in both simulation and patient clinic settings.  The OU College of Dentistry has graduated more than 2,000 dentists with an estimated 65% who went on to practice in Oklahoma.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1052Thu, 21 Feb 2013 00:00:00 GMT
OKState Dance Marathon 'Busts a Move' for Oklahoma's KidsOklahoma State University students will host the 2nd Annual OKState Dance Marathon on Saturday, February 23rd from 12 p.m. to 12 a.m. to raise money and change lives. Students will create a dynamic 12-hour experience that will benefit Children's Hospital Foundation through Children's Miracle Network Hospitals.

In 2012, Children's Hospital had over 162,000 patient visits, 4,707 of which were from Payne County and the surrounding area. OKState Dance Marathon helps raise awareness about the importance of research, education and clinical care for children in Oklahoma like Emily, a Stillwater native.

Emily was born weighing only two pounds, eight ounces, and spent five weeks on a ventilator before returning home. Doctors later discovered that Emily was missing the top of her left femur, requiring three major surgeries and months of physical therapy. At age four, Emily was diagnosed with Portal Vein Hypertension and Esophageal Varices. Doctors performed a banding procedure on Emily to prevent the stomach problems; it was the first endoscopic procedure of its kind at The Children's Hospital. Because of the world renowned physician-scientists at The Children's Hospital, Emily doesn't have to leave Oklahoma to receive top-notch care.

"On behalf of all students involved with Dance Marathon here at Oklahoma State University, we are excited to organize an event to help raise money for the children of Oklahoma," said Jeremiah Lane, Overall OKState Dance Marathon Director.

During the twelve-hour Marathon, the Colvin Recreation Center Annex, located on the OSU campus in Stillwater, will be filled with activities such as silent auctions, a date auction, dodge ball and basketball championships and a photo booth. The total amount of funds raised by the students throughout the year will be announced at the end of the night.

Participants will be inspired by interactions and activities with Miracle Children, along with special appearances by OSU athletics and OKC Thunder Dancers.

OKState Dance Marathon is sponsored by Kicker, Daddy O's Music, Orange Tech, Fuzzy's and Jimmy John's.

To continue to support OSU Dance Marathon, text CMN4KIDS to 50555 and a $5 donation will be charged to your next phone bill. All Mobile Giving donations will be added to the grand total.

For more information on Dance Marathon, visit www.okchf.org or contact Linzy Hall, CMN Hospitals Senior Development Officer, at 405-271-2208 or linzy-hall@ouhsc.edu

Children's Miracle Network Hospitals is an international non-profit organization dedicated to helping children by raising funds and awareness while keeping 100 percent of donations in the community where they are raised.  Children's Hospital Foundation is a proud affiliate of CMN Hospitals and is dedicated to providing funding for pediatric programs in research, education and clinical care for Oklahoma's children. 

###
 
ABOUT US:             
Children's Hospital Foundation, proud affiliate of Children's Miracle Network Hospitals, is a nonprofit 501c (3) organization in Oklahoma improving the health of children. Since its inception in 1983, Children's Hospital Foundation, through its volunteer board and vast community support, has funded pediatric research, education and clinical programs including collaborative projects with the OU Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center, OU Children's Physicians and the University Hospitals Authority and Trust.  For more information, contact Executive Director, Kathy McCracken at 405.650.1718 or visit our website: www.okchf.org.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1032Tue, 12 Feb 2013 00:00:00 GMT
OU Genetic Discovery Points to Diabetes Susceptibility GeneA University of Oklahoma researcher is among a team of scholars that has identified a gene that may predispose people to Type 2 Diabetes.

"Diabetes is not a simple disease," said Dr. Dharambir K. Sanghera, a genetics researcher with the OU College of Medicine's Department of Pediatrics. "It was considered that it was only a lifestyle disease; that it was caused by the way we eat," she said.

High fat diets were implicated, but doctors then noticed that diabetes was common among people who ate low-fat diets too. In fact, it was more common in some of these groups.

While diabetes is prevalent among six percent of white populations, the incidence is significantly higher among Latino (17 percent) and South Asian (20 percent) populations.

For a decade, Sanghera, director of the Molecular Genetic Epidemiology Laboratory at the OU Health Sciences Center, has joined other researchers in the search for a gene that causes Type 2 Diabetes. Now, they may have found it.  It's a discovery that marks quite a change from the commonly held beliefs about diabetes 30 years ago. Then, Sanghera said few thought diabetes was genetic in origin.  "We now know that diabetes is not only a lifestyle disease," Sanghera said. "It is also genetic, and there is a strong interaction between genes and lifestyle." However, finding the gene or genes that trigger diabetes is a complex task. Most studies have focused upon diabetes among Europeans. However, in a new paper, Sanghera and fellow researchers present the results of their genome-wide association study (GWAS) on a group of Punjabi Sikhs from northern India.

Unlike certain other groups, the Sikhs are largely free from traditional risk factors such as smoking, obesity and a diet heavy in meats. For religious and cultural reasons, Sikhs do not smoke or chew tobacco, and about half of them are lifelong vegetarians. Nevertheless, the prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes among the Sikhs is greater than 20 percent.
 
The GWAS found what Sanghera calls a "locus" among the 7329 Sikhs studied. That is they found a particular gene, called SGCG, which was strongly associated with a susceptibility to Type 2 Diabetes.

"We are thinking this is the gene that might be causing diabetes," she said. However, she noted the study can only claim to have found a high correlation--not a causal relationship--between the gene and diabetes.

"It means that more studies are needed to further dissect this gene," Sanghera explained.

While her study is the first to report on the SGCG gene and its association with diabetes, Sanghera said that other scientific studies have identified some 60 different genes that could also cause Type 2 Diabetes.

"The problem at this time is that there are a lot of genes and they are in interaction with each other as well as with life-style factors," she said, adding that the focus on the role of genetics in diabetes does not mean that life-style factors are irrelevant.

"If 50 percent of the contribution is genes, then 50 percent of the contribution is lifestyle and environment." Sanghera said.
 
Dr. Timothy Lyons, director of research and scientific programs at the Harold Hamm Diabetes Center, said that while  it has been known that Type 2 diabetes runs strongly in families, finding the genes responsible has proven challenging, in part because not just one or two, but many genes are involved. And while this research identified a gene that confers risk specifically in the Sikh community in India, the implications may be of importance to everyone else as well.

"An understanding of this newly identified gene may shed light on the mechanisms underlying Type 2 diabetes. Understanding these mechanisms is an essential step in the quest for a cure for diabetes," he said.

Lyons stressed the discovery does not undermine current thought on preventing Type 2 diabetes through lifestyle changes and treatments tailored specifically to each patient.

"Lifestyle modification is the most effective way to prevent Type 2 diabetes. However, this study demonstrates that the fight against diabetes in specific ethnic groups may have to go beyond our current focus on prevention," said Dr. Sanjay Bidichandani, CMRI Claire Gordon Duncan Chair in Genetics, OU College of Medicine. 

As studies continue, Sanghera believes that population-specific gene discoveries like theirs offer a glimpse of personalized medicine in the future.

"The importance of these findings is that the discovery of new gene-based targets will simplify the use of patients' genetic variations and allow for the selection of drug therapies tailored to their own genetic profile," she said.

The research appears in the journal Diabetes. The study was sponsored by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of National Institutes of Health. 

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1023Tue, 05 Feb 2013 00:00:00 GMT
OU College of Pharmacy Honored for Immunization EffortsThe University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy has been honored for its community immunization efforts by the American Pharmacists Association.

For the past three years, the OU College of Pharmacy has offered fall influenza vaccination clinics, providing more than 8,400 immunizations to people on the OU Health Sciences Center campuses in Oklahoma City and Tulsa. Their fall 2012 efforts immunized 3,292 people.
 
"We saw a remarkable 42 percent increase in vaccination rates on campus between year one and year three of the program," said Tracy Hagemann, Pharm.D., who spearheaded the initiative with fellow faculty member Susan Conway, Pharm.D.
 
Hagemann attributed the increase to refinements in the program that included altering clinic locations and times, as well as the addition of traveling pods that brought vaccinations to those who could not easily leave their work to come to a nearby clinic.
 
The college was selected from more than 80 nominations as the Honorary Mention recipient of the Association's Immunization Champion Award in the Community Outreach Category. The award will be presented March 3, 2013 at the APhA Annual Meeting in Los Angeles.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1022Mon, 04 Feb 2013 00:00:00 GMT
OU: ‘One Of The Country’s Strongest Public Research Universities’ Says Accreditation Committee ReportNORMAN — The University of Oklahoma is “one of the country’s strongest public research universities,” according to a newly released report from the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, which awarded the University reaccreditation with no additional monitoring.   The HLC-NCA Assurance Report is available here.

In its review of the University’s progress, the report noted that OU is “well known and respected, with a rich history,” and “is led by a long-term, strong, highly visible President who has developed a broad vision for the University and who has ensured that the institution has ‘stayed the course’ throughout the years, including through difficult economic times. The result has been dramatic progress in all dimensions of the University’s mission.”

“The University is extremely proud to have received such a complimentary and supportive report from our accrediting institution,” said OU President David L. Boren.  “It is confirmation of the high standards of excellence which are being met at OU.”

The commission’s report stated, “The University has a dynamic leadership team that has fostered involvement by faculty, students and staff across all campuses, and has developed support for the vision, and related actions, to strengthen the institution as it moves forward.”

The commission also pointed out that all levels of planning align with the University’s mission “…to provide the best possible educational experience for our students through excellence in teaching, research and creative activity, and service to the state and society ….” The commission noted that the university’s mission statement is clear and focused on excellence in teaching, research and service and to provide an outstanding student experience.

In addition, the four presidential priorities – teaching quality, research expansion, globalization and creation of community – embody key elements of the mission and set strategic directions that appear to be clear, specific and known by all.

The report highlights the fact that University leadership also has contributed to the attainment of OU’s research mission. OU’s “very high research standing” from the Carnegie Foundation is a tribute to faculty research activity and support from the central administration, the commission states. The classification from the Carnegie Foundation is the first time a public institution in Oklahoma has received this outstanding recognition.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1020
Dermatology Chairman AnnouncedThomas Stasko, M.D., a dermatologist, has been named professor and chairman of the department of dermatology at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. He is also establishing his medical practice with OU Physicians. Dermatologists diagnose and treat conditions of the skin.
        
Stasko has a special interest in diagnosing and treating patients with skin cancer. He specializes in Mohs surgery. He comes to OU Physicians from Vanderbilt University, Division of Dermatology, Nashville, where he was director of procedural dermatology and director of the Mohs micrographic surgery and cutaneous oncology fellowship. He is board certified in dermatology.
        
"The University of Oklahoma Department of Dermatology has a wonderful and storied history," Stasko said. "I hope to build on that and add a little bit to all the wonderful things that have been done here."
        
Stasko completed a fellowship in cutaneous and microscopically controlled surgery at New England Medical Center, Boston. He completed his dermatology residency at the University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, where he also earned his medical degree.                
        
Stasko is a member of the American Academy of Dermatology, American College of Mohs Surgery, American Dermatological Association, International Transplant-Skin Cancer Collaborative and Dermatology Foundation.
        
With more than 560 doctors, OU Physicians is the state's largest physician group. The practice encompasses almost every adult and child specialty. Many OU Physicians have expertise in the management of complex conditions that is unavailable anywhere else in the state, region or sometimes even the nation. Some have pioneered surgical procedures or innovations in patient care that are world firsts. 
        
OU Physicians see patients in their offices at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and at clinics in Edmond, Midwest City and other cities around Oklahoma. When hospitalization is necessary, they often admit patients to OU Medical Center. Many also care for their patients in other hospitals around the metro area. OU Physicians serve as faculty at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and train the region's future physicians.
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1008Wed, 30 Jan 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Dr. Thomas Murry Receives the Patricia Price Browne Prize in Biomedical EthicsThomas H. Murray, Ph.D. is Senior Research Scholar and President Emeritus of The Hastings Center.

Dr. Murray stepped down as President of The Hastings Center in June 2012 after having served in that position for 13 years. He was formerly the Director of the Center for Biomedical Ethics in the School of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University, where he was also the Susan E. Watson Professor of Bioethics. He serves on many editorial boards and has testified before many Congressional committees.

Among other current posts, Dr. Murray serves as Chair of the Ethical Issues Review Panel for the World Anti-Doping Agency, International Expert Advisor to Singapore’s Bioethics Advisory Committee, and Vice Chair of Charity Navigator. He has been president of the Society for Health and Human Values and of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities. Dr. Murray is the author of more than 250 publica-tions, including The Worth of a Child; The Cultures of Caregiving: Conflict and Common Ground Among Families, Health Professionals and Policy Makers, edited with Carol Levine; Genetic Ties and the Family: The Impact of Paternity Testing on Parents and Children, edited with Mark A. Rothstein, Gregory E. Kaebnick, and Mary Anderlik Majumder; Performance-Enhancing Technologies in Sports: Ethical, Conceptual, and Scientific Issues, edited with Karen J. Maschke and Angela A. Wasunna; and, most recently, Trust and Integrity in Biomedical Research: The Case of Financial Conflicts of Interest, edited with Josephine Johnston. He is also editor, with Maxwell J. Mehlman, of the Encyclopedia of Ethical, Legal and Policy Issues in Biotechnology. Dr. Murray is currently PI of The Hastings Center’s project, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, on ethics and synthetic biology. He is writing a book on values, drugs, and sport with the working title Why We Play. In 2004 he received an honorary Doctor of Medicine degree from Uppsala University.

Dr. Murray will receive the Prize and present Pediatrics/Medicine Grand Rounds "Why We Play: Ethics, Values, Sports" Wednesday, February 6, 2013 12:15pm—1:15pm
Rainbolt Family Auditorium
Samis Education Center
1200 Children’s Ave.,
Oklahoma City, OK
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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1007Mon, 28 Jan 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Oklahoma Poison Center Offers Guidelines for Children's Cold and Flu MedicationsWith cold and flu season at its peak the Oklahoma Poison Center, along with the American Academy of Pediatrics, advises against giving over-the-counter cough and cold medications to children under the age of 4 without a prescriber's recommendation.  These medications can cause side effects that include difficulty breathing, dizziness, increased heart rate and high blood pressure. 

Acetaminophen is often used to reduce fever and pain associated with the common cold and flu.  However, it can be very toxic to children when they are given too much, are given the medicine too often or are given the medicine with another product that contains acetaminophen.  The Oklahoma Poison Center is asking caregivers to read the drug facts box on medication containers to see how much medicine to give, when to give medication, and what the active ingredient is in the medication. 

The specialists at the Oklahoma Poison Center warn against giving children medication that is meant for adults.  If you are unsure about the right medication for a child or you do not understand the medicine's instructions, check with your doctor or pharmacist, or call the Oklahoma Poison Center at 1-800-222-1222. 

The Oklahoma Poison Center offers the following alternatives to treating the symptoms of the common cold and flu in children:
• saline nose spray will help to ease stuffy noses
• warm fluids (apple juice or water) can help relieve congestion and soothe sore throats
• flavored ice pops can provide a source of  liquid that soothes throat and hydrates the body
• hot and cold packs: apply around congested sinuses.  Both can make you feel more comfortable, but avoid a hot pack if the child is running a fever; it will raise the temperature
• chicken soup: it is warm, easy on the tummy and the steam ventilating into the nasal passages can serve as a natural decongestant
• petroleum jelly: place a small dab on the upper lip to lessen chafing from a runny nose
• peach syrup: drain the heavy syrup from canned peaches and drink it to help soothe sore throats
• honey is often recommended to help soothe sore throats but should never be given to children less than 1 year of age because of the risk of infant botulism, a rare type of food poisoning only affecting little ones

The Oklahoma Poison Center suggests contacting a doctor if your child is experiencing the following:
• a fever accompanied by vomiting or rash
• difficulty breathing: child is breathing fast (more than 40 times a minute) or working hard to breathe
• a child has a fever of more than 102° (a baby under 6 months of age with a fever of 100º should be seen by a doctor)
• if a child is sick for more than a week
• signs that something is wrong: a child who seems lethargic (overly tired); or a child who, after being given medicine, does not engage in any periods of play 
 
If you have questions about medication or believe a family member is having a reaction to medication, call the Oklahoma Poison Control Center for more information and treatment advice at 1-800-222-1222.  The Poison Help-line is answered 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year by trained specialists. The Oklahoma Poison Control Center serves as a valuable resource for Oklahomans, providing immediate, free and expert treatment advice, including medication information, when an actual or suspected exposure to poisonous, hazardous or toxic substances occurs.

The Oklahoma Poison Control Center, a program of the University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy at the OU Health Sciences Center, is one of 57 accredited regional poison control centers in the United States. 

For more information on the Oklahoma Poison Control Center, to order educational materials or schedule a presentation, please call Whitney Kemp at (405) 271-5062.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=1003Tue, 22 Jan 2013 00:00:00 GMT
OU Research May Help Doctors Prevent Recurrent StrokesDoctors who agonize over how best to treat stroke victims may be guided in the future by the results of a study conducted by a team of researchers at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.

Calin I. Prodan, M.D., with the OU College of Medicine's Department of Neurology  and Veterans Affairs Medical Center, led the research effort. He said it is clear that larger strokes, in general, are more dangerous than smaller ones; and many stroke victims have a second stroke within a year of their first one. The question is, how can doctors know which patients are at greater risk for a second stroke?

Researchers believed one indicator might be the percentage of coated-platelets. These are a subset of procoagulant platelets first described by Dr. George Dale with the OU Department of Medicine. It is these platelets that coagulate or clot the fastest, blocking blood vessels to the brain.

Normal human blood contains about 30 percent of coated-platelets. Stroke victims, however, have much higher percentages of coated-platelets - between 40 percent and 60 percent.

OU researchers set out to determine if the level of coated-platelets measured when the patient is admitted to the hospital for an initial stroke would help predict whether he or she would have a second stroke within a year.   

The team measured coated-platelet levels in 180 stroke victims and followed their case histories for a year. Stroke patients in the study were assigned to one of three groups based upon their levels of coated-platelets upon admission to the hospital.

The results were then analyzed with assistance from Julie Stoner, Ph.D., and Linda Cowan, Ph.D., of the OU College of Public Health. 
 
Twenty of the patients in the study suffered a subsequent stroke within a year, and 19 of those patients had medium or high coated-platelet levels. Only one recurrent stroke patient had low coated-platelet levels.

"What the results showed was that stroke patients with higher levels of this subset of procoagulant platelets are much more likely to have a second stroke within a period of a year," said Prodan.
 
For doctors treating stroke victims, he said the findings should help in determining the balance between risks and benefits as well as the desirability of aggressive as opposed to more conservative treatment.

"If you know that this group of patients is much more likely to have another stroke within a year, then you're going to be much more aggressive in treating and managing those patients who are higher risk, compared to the ones who are lower risk," he said.
 
Prodan said the study is a good example of "translational" research, that is, research that begins in the laboratory, moves into the clinical world, and then returns to scientific study, where specialists from a range of medical backgrounds can evaluate the results.
 
"It's kind of like standing on a taller mountain," he said. "You can see farther away."
 
The team next plans to utilize coated-platelet levels as a potential predictor of subsequent stroke in a larger group of patients. The goal is to build a model that will enable doctors to identify those patients at greater risk for recurrent stroke and also those who are more likely to benefit from aggressive stroke prevention treatment with the fewest side effects.
 
"So in the end it may lead us to an individualized risk model as well as an individualized treatment protocol," Prodan said.

The study was financed by grants from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Clinical Science Research and Development Service and the American Heart Association.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=995Wed, 16 Jan 2013 00:00:00 GMT
RSV - What Parents Need to KnowThis year, The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center has already seen a lot of babies and children with RSV, the acronym for respiratory syncytial virus.  Since late November, the hospital has seen about 50 children a week.  From December 30, 2012 until January 5, 2013, the number of children with RSV seen at Children's hit 60.

RSV causes infection of the lungs and breathing passages.  It's also a major cause of respiratory illness in young children and is especially dangerous in babies less than three months of age. There is no approved vaccine, and treatment options are very limited.

"In healthy adults, RSV usually is not severe. We may get symptoms similar to the common cold, such as a stuffy or runny nose, cough, or mild wheezing.  However, in babies and those who have diseases that impact their lungs, heart or immune system, RSV can be quite serious, leading to complications like pneumonia and bronchiolitis that are severe enough to require hospitalization" said Robert Welliver, M.D., a pediatric infectious disease specialist with OU Children's Physicians.

33-year-old Mikala Watkins of Del City knows all too well how serious RSV can be in a young child. Her baby Sophie was only 10 days old when she started experiencing symptoms of a cold.

"It was just a stuffy nose, but she was too young to take medicine. So I took her to the doctor who said she wasn't breathing right. And told me that 'if it was my baby, I would take her right to Children's Hospital,' and so I did," Watkins said.

Within just a few minutes of arriving at the Children's Emergency Room, Sophie was evaluated and admitted to the hospital. Watkins had heard of RSV before, but had no idea how serious it could be.

"I thought they would just give her antibiotics and we would be fine, but they explained it is a virus and so it has to run its course," she said.

RSV is the number one cause of pneumonia and lower respiratory infections in children under the age of one.

"For children with mild disease, there are no specific treatments necessary. Instead, we would focus on helping alleviate symptoms.  However, children with severe disease may require oxygen therapy and even mechanical ventilation," Welliver said. "That's why prevention is so important for very young children.

 RSV infections often occur in epidemics that last from late fall through early spring.  In Oklahoma, January to February is the heart of RSV season.

"It is highly contagious. It can live briefly on surfaces like countertops or toys and on hands. So, when a person touches those surfaces and then touches his nose or mouth, they can easily infect themselves or pass the infection on by touching another person. It also can possibly be spread through droplets containing the virus when someone coughs or sneezes" Welliver said.

RSV can spread very rapidly through schools and childcare settings. Babies are often infected when older siblings carry the virus home and pass it on to them.

Prevention strategies for RSV are similar to those for influenza, Welliver explained. They include:
•  Frequent hand washing (hand sanitizers can also be useful)
•  Sneezing or coughing into your elbow or a tissue – not your hand
•  Disposing of used tissues properly
•  Avoiding crowded areas or events like shopping malls, stores or sports arenas
•  Staying home from work, school, day care, church and other activities when sick
 
"I just think – what if I hadn't known about RSV. It scares me to think about what might have happened if I didn't take her in and I want other parents to know just how serious RSV is and how dangerous it can be for babies," said Watkins.

Interestingly, almost all children have had RSV at least once by the time they are two years of age.

To learn more about RSV, visit www.oumedicine.com/RSV.

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https://news.ouhsc.edu/templates/?z=0&a=994Thu, 17 Jan 2013 00:00:00 GMT
Miracle Kids Participate in Tissue Box Design ContestOklahoma City miracle child and cancer survivor, Camden, has been chosen as one of 8 finalists in a design contest for White Cloud tissue brand. Kruger Products' White Cloud brand, sold exclusively at Walmart, has invited miracle kids across the nation to draw their own tissue box designs for a chance to have it printed on a White Cloud Facial Tissue box to be sold in Walmart stores.  Three designs will be selected by January 30th and, in addition, the winning CMN Hospitals will each receive a $15,000 donation from Kruger.

At the age of 18 months, Camden was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) and admitted to the Jimmy Everest Cancer Center at Children's Hospital to begin treatment. He underwent chemotherapy and eight rounds of full body irradiation in preparation for a bone marrow/stem cell transplant. Under the care of Dr. William Meyer, CMRI Ben Johnson Chair in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, and his team, Camden is currently in remission. He continues to